"Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent.
Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent.
Is he both able, and willing? Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither willing, nor able? Then why call him God"

Epicurus (341-270BC)

Death does not concern us, because as long as we exist, death is not here. And when it does come, we no longer exist.

Epicurus (341-270BC)

It is folly for a man to pray to the gods for that which he has the power to obtain by himself.

Epicurus (341-270BC)

Astronomy compels the soul to look upwards and leads us from this world to another.

Plato (427 BC - 347 BC)

Dictatorship naturally arises out of democracy, and the most aggravated form of tyranny and slavery out of the most extreme liberty.

Plato (427 BC - 347 BC)

It is right to give every man his due. Justice in the life and conduct of the State is possible only as first it resides in the hearts and souls of the citizens. Justice means minding one's own business and not meddling with other men's concerns.

Plato (427 BC - 347 BC)

No evil can happen to a good man, either in life or after death.

Plato (427 BC - 347 BC)

Only the dead have seen the end of the war.

Plato (427 BC - 347 BC)

I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use.

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

“The Sun, with all the planets revolving around it, and depending on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as though it had nothing else in the Universe to do.”

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

“I have never met a man so ignorant that I couldn't learn something from him.”

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual.

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

Where the senses fail us, reason must step in.

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

It is surely harmful to souls to make it a heresy to believe what is proved.

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

Infinities and indivisibles transcend our finite understanding, the former on account of their magnitude, the latter because of their smallness; Imagine what they are when combined.

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the Scriptures, but with experiments, and demonstrations.

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.

Isaac Newton (1642-1727)

I can calculate the motion of heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people.

Isaac Newton (1642-1727)

I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.

Isaac Newton (1642-1727)

You cannot prove that which unknown with that which is unproven and cannot know what is unproven with that which is unknown.

Me (2009)

If the future is un-set then prophecy cannot exist

If the future is set then free-will cannot exist

Me (2009)

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Comment by John on January 11, 2009 at 9:34am
The Epicurus argument is the root of my position on "god". As an atheist, I still do not rule out the possibility of "something out there" as it is something I can neither prove or disprove. If one wants to call it "god" or "a god", so be it. There could be 100's or even thousands throughout the infinity. However, I do not think that in the instance that one or any of them actually existed, (another definition in itself) it or they would bother to or have any purpose intervening or interfering in the daily lives of humans.
Comment by James M. Martin on January 11, 2009 at 12:44am
The Epicurus argument was taken up by the Australian philosopher J. L. Mackie and is just possibly the single most cogent argument against "God" advanced to date. Believers can never explain why evil exists when all human affairs are guided by an omnipotent, omniscient, "completely good" deity. The most often explanation is that some do evil because "God" gave us freedom of will. But then, why couldn't he arrange things so that we exercise our freedom of will in only good ways?
Comment by Clarence Dember on January 11, 2009 at 12:36am
Great to read this. Thanks.
Cla

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