TODAY IS AUTISM AWARENESS DAY
I HAPPEN TO LOVE A CHILD WITH AUTISM
MY NIECE IS A NORMAL CHILD
EXCEPT THAT HER BRAIN IS CONFIGURED DIFFERENTLY
AUTISTIC PEOPLE OFTEN HAVE
ACUTE SENSES OF HEARING OR VISION
BUT OTHERWISE THEY CAN HAVE NORMAL LEVELS OF INTELLIGENCE
OR SOMETIMES THEY CAN BE GENIUSES FOR THE SAME REASON
EINSTEIN WAS AUTISTIC
AND SO WAS MOZART
PLEASE TAKE THE TIME
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT AUTISM
BEFORE YOU JUDGE SOMEONE AUTISTIC!

Views: 107

Comment

You need to be a member of Atheist Nexus to add comments!

Join Atheist Nexus

Comment by Richard ∑wald on April 3, 2012 at 2:06pm

Autism is a spectrum disorder, there are no "typical" autistic kids. There are three ways of dealing with this if you have a child so afflicted. Accommodating autism, overcoming autism or a mixture of the two.

For some autistic kids, overcoming their "differences" is the best bet, it isn't easy and it takes a lot of work. After reading this book: Overcoming Autism, when I was new to this family, I have spent much of my time in the last two years working with my stepson following the strategies from this book.

He's gone from being a "Special Education" student in 3rd grade to being mainstreamed in all subjects except for language arts in the 4th grade. I believe this approach will allow him more choices in his future.

Comment by Idaho Spud on April 3, 2012 at 1:38pm

I like the idea of looking at autism not as a disease, but as a different way of thinking.

Since leaving religion, I'm learning to appreciate diversity.

Comment by Hiram on April 3, 2012 at 1:26pm

Temple Grandin is one of my personal heroes :)  The movie made me cry, and so did 'My Name is Khan' with actor Shahrukhan (however you spell it), he did an amazing job.  It's a very powerful movie, particularly if you have a child with autism in your family.  I kept thinking of the challenges that my niece will face when she grow up, when she falls in love, etc. but people like Grandin give me hope.

I even wrote an article on her entitled Diversity 301: Learning from Temple Grandin.  We DO need different brains and different perspectives, in fact recent human evolution relies more and more on wits than any other ability: we have no fangs, no predatory organs in our bodies, we're homo SAPIENS (=wise hominid).  In my last blog entry entitled The Real X-Men, where I discuss some of the genetics and mutations related to autism according to recent studies, I said:

I'm beginning to see autism not as a disease but as part of neurodiversity and the discourse around autism should be reframed within the context of human diversity. That is, diversity includes not only learning to tolerate and live with people of different languages, cultures, religions and sexual orientations but it should also involve learning to live with neurodiversity: learning to relate to introverts and extraverts, and learning to relate with autistic individuals and having a broader understanding of how people with different brains see the world. I am not alone in this view. There's even an Autism Pride movement!

 

 

Comment by Idaho Spud on April 3, 2012 at 12:58pm

I didn't know much about autism until I found the Temple Grandin movie.  Here's my review of it:

This relatively unknown movie is the very accurate story of Temple Grandin, an Autistic woman who accomplished amazing things despite horrific obstacles.

With the help of her mother and a few friends, she overcame Autism enough to Get a Ph.D. in Animal Husbandry and several other degrees.   She is now a professor and constant worldwide lecturer on Autism and Animal Husbandry. She’s a nerd that loves science and uses the latest scientific findings, as well as her own experiences in her lectures.

Her greatest mentor was a science teacher who took a special interest in her and worked with her talents instead of trying to force her into the straight jacket of what most people considered the normal and acceptable way of doing things. He helped her accomplish what she did against the constant current of negativism from hostile students that teased and degraded her, the doctors that said she was hopeless and the other teachers that gave-up on her and tried to get her kicked-out of school.

She has harsh words to say about the BS the physiologists of the 60’s came-up with about the causes of Autism. For one thing, everything was “sexual” to them. Another false teaching was that Autism was caused by an emotionally distant mother, or another kind of “psychic injury”. Not true. It is caused by a mis-wiring of the brain at the start of life.

Temple Grandin is a visual thinker, which means she remembers every image she sees and connects them to figure-out how to accomplish what she wants. She says the visuals in this movie shows exactly how her mind works and how she sees things.

One thing she created was a “hugging” machine that calmed her when she had anxiety attacks due to sensory overload in social situations. It eventually helped her learn how to accept hugs from people, a thing that she couldn't stand for many years. It has also helped other Autistic people.

She closely studied the actions of cattle to determine how to create equipment and methods of handling cattle which are much more humane and profitable, and are now used in half of the cattle-handling companies in the USA.

It was just by luck that I found this movie hiding in the children's section of the small rental store near my house. Boy, am I glad I did. This amazing and powerful story brought many emotional tears. It even had some humor! I highly recommend it.

Here's a TED talk by Temple Grandin: http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/temple_grandin_the_world_needs_all...

Here's her official web site:  http://www.templegrandin.com/

Here's a Trailer of the movie: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpkN0JdXRpM

Here's an article I found on increasing intelligence in Autistic people that indicates we can all do it:  http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/03/07/you-can-i...

*

Comment by Richard ∑wald on April 2, 2012 at 9:01pm

This is what an autistic kid looks like:

Comment by Richard ∑wald on April 2, 2012 at 6:41pm

Yes, there are a lot of woo slingers who have autistic kids, tough to try and straighten them out though, it's like they need something or somebody to blame.

Comment by Richard ∑wald on April 2, 2012 at 4:04pm

My step-son is autistic, he's also a normal child. He just needs to put effort into learning things that seem second-nature to the rest of us.

Support Atheist Nexus

Donate Today

Donate

 

Help Nexus When You Buy From Amazon

Amazon

 

© 2014   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service