From Netflix, I just watched 8: The Mormon Proposition and was outraged at what these pompous fuddy-duddies are getting away with. They are causing needless suffering and even death, all in the name of their whacky religion.


The documentary starts with the marriage of a truly in-love, young gay couple. You can see they weren't faking it; they were practically crying that they finally had their chance to be happy. What proceeds is the work of an grotesque ogre in a medieval fairy tale.


Since the early '90s the Mormon Church was working silently and secretly to prevent gay marriage from becoming legal. In emails the church elders worked like Mafia dons pulling strings to form a “coalition” so no one would suspect it was the Church of Ladder-day Saints manipulating public opinion. They approached the Catholics and formed a formidable political bloc.


Next the film shows how they raised eleven-million dollars to give to lobbyists. Church officials actually visited member houses and told the flock how much money the pigeon family should give! Outrageous. “That's right, Mr. and Mrs. Do-right. You tithed nearly five thousand last year with a hundred dollar check every Sunday. Very commendable. But now it's time to get real. Write out a check for 20 large right now, made out to the CLS.” Hundreds of righteous families obeyed; it's in their programming to be obedient. One upright family with five young kids cashed in their college savings and handed over 50 dollar thousand to fight the gay menace.


The pro Proposition-8 protesters were surreal. What hatred, what vehemence. One “street preacher” screamed his opinion that gays are undermining the moral fabric of the country and he feared everyone might turn gay. Another scowling and fist-shaking membot claimed the gays were out to proselytize and subvert children to their bare-faced (and bare-ass) debauchery.


Utah has the most suicides of any state in the union—by far. The hatred, rumors and in-your-face scorn are enough to drive many young gays to suicide. The film actually shows clips of a gay couple being dreadfully beaten up by a mob because the young lovers touched lips near a Mormon church.


Other teens were forced to leave their homes and wind up living on the streets of San Francisco and other cities. What a brutal existence for a child and it's prevalent and a national disgrace. Three adolescents were trying to grind out an existence in the basement of a slum derelict building, sleeping on discarded filthy mattresses. One pathetic kid said, “Yeh, it's tough trying to sleep with cockroaches crawling all over you.”

(Does this piss you off? For humanity's sake! This is America.)


The church might have used the money to help these kids and countless other homeless. Instead, the money found its way to the bank accounts of already rich lawyers. The events surrounding Proposition 8 show clearly what religion does to people. Tax the fucks.




Views: 28

Tags: cls, endmeme, gays

Comment

You need to be a member of Atheist Nexus to add comments!

Join Atheist Nexus

Comment by D R Hosie on November 9, 2010 at 2:07am
When you get a chance, take a look at this editorial on the proposed same sex civil unions in Hawaii. It's a kick in the nuts aimed at the Mormons.
Comment by Richard Goscicki on October 30, 2010 at 8:06pm
Thanks, Clarence. Would you explain how this works?
Comment by Clarence Dember on October 30, 2010 at 12:09pm
The first instance of non-apportioned taxation made it easier to accomplish all the wrest. I think apportionment in representation as well as taxation is what the U.S. Constitution calls for. I think the only way to stop the government from behaving crazy is to keep it small and in control. Limit the funds it gets with apportionment.
Comment by Richard Goscicki on October 23, 2010 at 3:08pm
Thanks, and don't forget your impression of the movie as a whole.

I thought it was well done. The kids did a great job presenting their side of Proposition 8. Made the Mormons brutal, sneaky and hard-headed—as well as other pejoratives. Not good credentials for a religion.

The producers of the documentary's worst enemy is apathy.

To share your optimism about Holy Books, it looks like the internet, modern science and youth's need to rebel will vanquish the Church's power over the mind. Their position is intellectually indefensible.

I mean, half of the young people of California are smoking weed. Utah's youth can't stay isolated in the modern age. But I'm a '60s hippie and would naturally assume that the young people need to rebel.

If the whole country moves politically to the right with this Tea Party bullshit, the Mormons will grow even stronger. Great to be alive, just to see what happens.
Comment by Brian Dalton on October 23, 2010 at 2:21am
Richard, I'll copy those down and post them here when I watch.
Comment by Richard Goscicki on October 22, 2010 at 9:40pm
Brian, they list three websites at the end which I didn't copy down. Could you post the couple here. Maybe I can give them some feedback and moral support.
Comment by Richard Goscicki on October 22, 2010 at 9:38pm
But I'm already infuriated.

I know exactly what you mean. It's the stealth, the underhanded sneakiness of the church. The secret coalitions, the elitist use of power and money.

Wait 'til you see the end of the movie with the poor kids living on the streets. Thanks for sharing this with me. It's a moral outrage, a national disgrace.
Comment by Brian Dalton on October 22, 2010 at 6:23pm
Yeah, you're right, Richard. I should have clarified that I was talking about the West and the Bible. I think the Islamic world has a long way to go. But I'm fairly ignorant. I'll have to check out that movie. BTW, for anyone else trying to get "8: The Mormon Proposition", it's available through iTunes and Apple TV. I've downloaded it but haven't had a chance to watch more than the first 20 minutes. But I'm already infuriated.
Comment by Richard Goscicki on October 22, 2010 at 1:47pm
Brian, I watched documentary Inside the Koran. I gotta question if Holy Books are diminishing in control. These people are acting like it was the word of God.

Picture thousands of surreal people meandering around a sacred, shiny-copper-looking building in Mecca. I think he said it was called the Kava, something like that. They are in a fuckin' trance of some sort. Then we're in a giant, artistically beautiful mosque and thousands of men (the women are in the back behind screens) start kissing the floor and sticking their asses high in the air. And they all chant Koran verses to induce some sort of self-hypnotic dream state.

You're not even supposed to criticize any part of the book under a serious threat of blasphemy. Also, it was back just to 1974 that women in Cairo could walk the streets without any covering on the face. Now they are forbidden to "display their beauty" and I'm not talking about the pudendum (from the word for "shame")—their faces in many parts of the city.

Pardon the switch from the Mormons to Islam but it's equally as strange. Holy Books might be getting worse.
Comment by Brian Dalton on October 21, 2010 at 10:47am
Gays are anathema for several reasons. First, Mormons are people of the Book. So, when the Book says that Homosexuality is an "abomination" (Lev. 18: 22), they take that seriously. Second, in order to reach the highest degree of glory in the Mormon afterlife and become a god (small "g"), you need to have a celestial marriage for time (this life) and all eternity. Celestial marriages are only performed in Mormon temples between a man and a woman.

Basically, the only reason is that Book, the regard for which must ultimately be neutralized if we are ever to progress as a people. Thankfully, the influence of Holy Books seems to be diminishing. Virtually no one believes it's right to stone adulterers or sabbath-breakers anymore. But we need to keep fighting that battle with everything we have in us.

Support Atheist Nexus

Donate Today

Donate

 

Help Nexus When You Buy From Amazon

Amazon

AJY

 

© 2014   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service