Astronomers

A group for people who enjoy the stars. :)
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  • MJ

    @StephenG You're welcome... I am always in awe of good space photos...
  • Jim C.

    Let's not dismiss the bachelor's degree! I got my BS in physics and have been loving my life as a planetarium director for more than 11 years now! It's actually what I wanted to do after college and I can't think of much else I'd rather do.
  • MsGalaxy

    How nice to find this group! I founded the Southern Oregon Skywatchers in 1993 and have been an avid amateur astronomer for twenty years. Got my chemistry degree at age 44; if my local university had had a degree in astronomy I would have gotten that instead.
  • Pete Soderman

    Hi:

    I'm a new member, just found Atheist Nexus, and very glad to be here. Just completed a new scope using a mirror I have had for a couple of years. Like any other ATM, I love to share it. Info available here.

    Thanks for being here!

    Pete Soderman
  • Ryan Tombleson

    Hopefully second time is a charm...

    In case any of you guys missed the Perseids (thank you very much Charlotte) Astronomy.com has a nice time lapse video over a three day period:
    Here
  • Gecko, Seth...brother of Richie!

    Cant believe Im just finding this group!
  • Gecko, Seth...brother of Richie!

    neiltyson Just an FYI: New asteroid "2010GA6," size of a house, will buzz-cut Earth at 7:06pm ET today, coming closer than the Moon
  • Little Name Atheist

    Will we be able to see this asteroid with our nekkid eyes?
  • Gecko, Seth...brother of Richie!

    Dont know this is a good question.
  • Stephen Goldin

    I tend to think that, with an object that small, you'd do much better to clothe your eyes (say, in a telescope).
  • George

    @Grundgetta
    Newfound Asteroid Will Fly Close by Earth Thursday (space.com)

    The asteroid will pass 9/10ths of the distance between the earth and the moon - 223,000 miles - so I would say no.
  • Gecko, Seth...brother of Richie!

  • George

    Two asteroids to pass near earth today

    Wired.com: Asteroid Double Whammy Near Earth Wednesday

    Get out your telescopes! Two small asteroids will come within moon distance of Earth Wednesday.

    The first, asteroid 2010 RX30, will come within 154,100 miles of Earth — about 60 percent of the Earth-moon distance — at 5:51 a.m. EDT (1251 UT). This asteroid is estimated to be about 42 feet across.

    The second, 2010 RF12, will come almost 12 hours later, at 5:12 p.m. EDT (0012 UT Thursday). It will swing by Earth at just 20 percent the Earth-moon distance, or 47,845 miles. 2010 RF12 is even smaller, only about 23 feet across.
  • Sarah Walton

    Anyone see the Harvest Moon?
  • The Big Blue Frog

    I saw it as it was rising last night. Didn't get out after dark to look at it. It was only 6 hours off of the equinox, IIRC.
  • Sarah Walton

  • George

    @Sarah

    That is pretty cool.


    From 17 miles up
  • George

    Milky Way timelapse

  • AtheistTech

  • AtheistTech

  • AtheistTech

    Has anyone else thought about the orientation of the Milky Way in the sky and how it relates to the orbital plane of the Earth? I wonder if it is common to have an orbital plane that does not match the Milky Way orbital plane?
  • Richard Lawrence

    I believe that the ecliptic and the plane of the galaxy are not the same.
  • AtheistTech

    Thanks Rich. Would you offer a reason or two why you believe that?
  • George

    @Cane - Obital planes are almost always going to be tilted related to other orbital planes because it is unlikely for them to align exactly.  Just like the axis of the earth's spin is tilted with respect to the earth's orbit around the Sun.

    Wikipedia - article celestial coordinate systems

  • AtheistTech

    @George - Orbital planes have to do with the gravitational collapse of a cloud (nebula). The collapse causes a spin, but there is nothing specific that controls in what direction the spin will occur. I believe it is random.
  • A Former Member

    Thanks for the info Cane. I posted the sun pics. I didn't realize their was an astronomy group. I've posted lots of space-related posts over in the Science group, if anyone is interested.
  • AtheistTech

    Super-sized Lunar Eclipse Saturday 12-10-2011

    Get the details beloiw:

  • George

    Wikipedia: December 2011 lunar eclipse

    Not sure how much of the eclipse will be visible on the East coast

  • Sandi

    Our big blue marble:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/25/blue-marble-2012-earth-ima...

    How brown the land is. What happened to all the green?

  • The Big Blue Frog

    If that's a current photo, then we have to realize that it's winter in the northern hemisphere. That explains the brown. Notice that the Southeast, where there are more evergreens, is still fairly green.

  • Steph S.

  • AtheistTech

  • Sarah

    Gorgeous shot of Saturn, Titan and Prometheus from Cassini:

    http://www.universetoday.com/93853/moons-large-and-small/#more-93853 

  • Scott Baker

    Just joined Atheist Nexus and found this group.  Amazing, it's astronomy that really helped me to become a critical thinker and no that religion is just a myth.

    I have a roll off roof observatory in the mountains of San Diego with a 14" Meade LX200 GPS telescope.  Although it doesn't get a lot of use with my current work schedule, I've been doing this hobby for 40 years and can't learn enough.  I do enjoy doing outreach for local schools and groups and am the founder of "Julian StarFest", a three night star party, public outreach and vendor exhibit in Julian, CA.

    Hope to enjoy the discussions here.

    Scott

  • Scott Baker

    That should be "know" not "no".  Been a long day.

  • Sarah Walton

  • Jedi Wanderer

    Yeah Sarah! That was fun, thanks!

  • Sarah Walton

    You're welcome! If They Might Be Giants ever come to your neck of the woods check them out.

  • Sarah Walton

    April 11-20 is the final opportunity to participate in GLOBE at Night this year. Go outside an hour after sunset (8-10pm local time), look up, use one of their magnitude charts to measure how dark your local sky is and report back to them.

  • Sarah Walton

  • AtheistTech

  • AtheistTech

    Which planet is this? Which space probe took the pictures used to build this big picture? What general feature are we seeing in this picture? Have you ever seen this planet from this perspective before this picture (I haven't)? I hope you have enjoyed it as much as I have!!!!

  • Loren Miller

    I will take a guess and say the one which Gustav Holst called "The Bringer of Jollity" ... and the view from the pole IS a MOST unusual view!

  • Sarah Walton

    Ha! Amazing! Thanks!

  • Steph S.

    Beautiful picture Cane!

  • Joan Denoo

    JUPITER The Bringer Of Jollity

    Thanks, I have not heard of Holst or ""The Bringer of Jollity". My education is lacking. 

  • Joan Denoo

  • Joan Denoo

    God, your "Magnifying the Universe" just sends goose bumps when I take the journey!. I love the concept of micro- to tele- scopic views. 

    Where did you find the photo of Jupiter from that perspective? A great photo!

  • Joan Denoo

    Write4U

    It is a cold and rainy day; your music fits the mood. Very nice. 

  • AtheistTech

    @ Joan : I subscribed to this newsletter (weekly email) and it was in the email from Mon, May 21, 2012     http://www.yearinspace.com/weekly-e-mail.html