Do you think religion should be abolished?If yes why , if no why not?

I think that religion didn't cause anything good but only start wars, create gilt , hold science back , repressing women's rights, repress sexual subjects , promotes violence racism sectrianism backwardness discrimination ignorance , violates human rights , opression of homosexuals , bigotry , hatred , extremism , terrorism . But sometimes it helps people cope with their problems. I want to hear your opinions and arguments. Plus excuse my English since it's a second language. 

PS : I meant abolish not by forcing but using logic and reason.

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    Chris Crawford

    Should alcohol be abolished?

    Should pornography be abolished?

    Should homosexuality be abolished?

    Should chocolate ice cream be abolished?

    Should apocalyptic fiction be abolished?

    Should bad taste be abolished?

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      Joan Denoo

      @Anthony Jordan, I rather enjoy it when religious come to my door because it gives me an opportunity to define why I think they are wrong, foolish, illiterate, illogical, dispassionate, and evil. Furthermore, missionaries hold the winner's cup for being obnoxious. There is no respect in respecting those who are not respecting me. There is no honor in honoring those who dishonor me.
      Any child who is told of a father being willing to kill his own son in obedience to his god is a victim of abuse, even if the knife did not plunge into his body.
      Any adult who is told he or she will burn in eternal damnation if he or she does not accept some unseeable and un-hearable being as savior is a victim of tyranny.
      Disgust is the closest I can muster to being civil to such a person.

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        Dr. Allan H. Clark

        Abolish sounds too aggressive even considering all the harm religion has done. It would be much better to see it "melt, thaw, and resolve itself into a dew." The Buddhist notion that people are on different places on the path to enlightenment and that you must start where you are and work forward has a greater appeal. It will take a very long time, but the results will be more likely to last. In Europe religion has all but vanished from the large cities and to some extent that is true in the U.S. What is happening right now is progress—people like Dawkins, Hitchens, Harris, and others writing books and speaking out.

        The most important effort at the moment is to prevent religion from intruding on personal freedoms and increasing its political influence.

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