Politics, Economics, and Religion

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Politics, Economics, and Religion

Religion has so many connections to political and economic beliefs, there needs to be a place to identify linkages, problems, goals, options, action plans and evaluation criteria.  

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What is the purpose of life?

An eternal question, what is the purpose of life?, occupied philosophers’ thoughts throughout history. Stone pictographs reveal even primitive peoples reflected on this query. Each one has the capacity to define his or her personal thinking about politics, economics and religion.

Discussion Forum

An Open Letter to Congressman John Boehner

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 18. 1 Reply

Some days ago, Congressman John Boehner (R - Ohio) wrote an op-ed piece entitled, "…Continue

Tags: president, Barack Obama, sue, John Boehner

Tomgram: Engelhardt, The Age of Impunity

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Plinius Jul 14. 4 Replies

TomDispatch  http://t.co/nKYjnph4Ke"For America’s national security state, this is the age of impunity.  …Continue

Why we're headed for another Great Crash

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 2. 1 Reply

Thom Hartmann makes a case that we're driving the economy to another Great Crash.The denial of fundamental economic principles is setting the world up for another Great Crash.... corporate banks have ... discovered that instead of lending money to…Continue

Tags: financialization

Climate Politics of US State Governors

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Casey Pittman Jul 3. 1 Reply

Is the governor of your state suckling at the fossil fuel industry teat, while climate disasters whack citizens? As a Pennsylvanian, I'm ashamed to say mine is.... over 77 percent of all oil and gas contributions are being funneled to governors who…Continue

Tags: , , Extreme weather disasters, Change, Climate, State Governors

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Comment by Joan Denoo on June 22, 2013 at 8:59pm

A tour of Ireland with a group of feminists with Padregin McGillicuddy as our Irish guide revealed some interesting things about pre-Christian Ireland that you may enjoy reading. Reading this script of one of her radio shows makes me feel like Pady is right beside me telling me this story in person. 


"The Pat' Ri-Arch Revealed: A Feminist View of St. Patrick
by Padraigin McGillicuddy
1981

"Under the Brehon Laws, marriage was a wonderfully flexible institution. Not a hint of the sacrosanct, it was a contract only, and the laws were quite specific on who could enter into such a contract. Excluded were men who were barren, impotent, property-less, very fat (being too obese to do IT) and indiscreet men who babbled the secrets of the woman's bed. Now you know women had a hand in devising that list! Very similar to one I'd propose in the wisdom of my forty years.

"The fundamental concept was that fluctuations occurred in sexual affections (nothing novel there), but rather than make them illegal or pretend they didn't happen, it was better to legislate for them (and there's where their sensibleness outshines us).

"Therefore they compiled no less than ten different contracts for marriage for:
- unions of equal rank
- women supported by the man
- men supported by women
- a concubine or "loved one" as the Gaelic would have it
- women and men keeping company, but not living together permanently and neither wholly supporting the other
- the abducted woman (she and her child had legal rights)
- the wandering soldier and his spouse
- forced or deceitful unions
- union between the insane"

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 22, 2013 at 8:52pm

Oh yes, fear! The great enemy to life and living. Life and living and everything becomes a thing to fear. Face the earth, sky, water, nature and community with curiosity and anticipation, they all become friends. 
Native Americans were puzzled by European's fear of natural processes, and yet they were considered savages by the invaders. Well, perhaps those who fear natural processes need a god to give them safety, security, and stability, however, they are faux-protection.

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 19, 2013 at 1:12pm

Grinning Cat, like the article, "Republican Jesus". It spells out the problems as I perceive them. 

Comment by Grinning Cat on June 19, 2013 at 11:33am

(from the article Republican Jesus by Justin Rosario at addictinginfo.org)

When I was a kid, I was taught that the Pilgrims fled to the New World to escape religious persecution. [...] Through all of this, it never occurred to me that I would ever have to worry about a particular set of religious values being forced upon me. [...]

Fast forward to the George W. Bush years. [...] And that’s when I became acquainted with Republican Jesus™.

Who the hell is Republican Jesus™?

Republican Jesus™ is very different than the Jesus you and I are familiar with. First off, he is White. Not just white, but White.
[continue reading]

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 13, 2013 at 12:24pm

Highlander Center

In 1968, working with the civil rights movement in Washington, DC, much of our organizational material came from Highlander and its fine group of people. Myles Horton inspired a lot of people and the music that came out of that place set the mood for peaceful resistance under the direction of Zilphia Horton, music director of the Highlander Folk School 
Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks were trained there, as were the lunch counter sit-in people, Highlander's annual college workshop took place on the first weekend in April, with 83 students from twenty colleges attending the first year. 
https://www.facebook.com/highlander.center
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Carawan#Career_at_Highlander_Center
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/We_Shall_Overcome
Pete Seeger, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62EOg3Io3_I

Comment by Dyslexic's DOG on June 11, 2013 at 11:59pm

One problem found in multicultural societies is just that, separation from society by enclaves of same ethnicity, religious or cultural groups. These are often the breeding grounds of radicals and even terrorists.

Separation from society may be an individual option, but, when an entire group separates and define their own subculture, the main society can suffer. 

The ghettos are examples of these enclaves of subcultures and we know of the problems they face from history.

In Australia we have such enclaves and we are trying to disperse them so they blend better into the overall super-culture, reducing the risk of enclave based gang violence and cultural wars.

Finding people of common interest and beliefs is fine, so long as it doesn't become a divisive sub-culture. These small pictures need to blend unobtrusively into the bigger picture to produce a more variant but harmonious social fabric.

Britain is also having difficulties with the formation of Islamic enclaves and divisive right wing enclaves in the industrial regions.

Comment by Lord Ainsworth on June 11, 2013 at 11:05pm

Very true.

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 11, 2013 at 9:58pm

Yes, separating from society is one option. Another might be to find people with common interests and imagine a preferred outcome. Working toward a goal, especially if others share that goal, is how evolution occurs. 

Comment by Lord Ainsworth on June 11, 2013 at 9:52pm

I would say, purpose of life is to separate from society. 

Comment by Lord Ainsworth on June 11, 2013 at 9:45pm

Individualism isn't a problem of state.

 
 
 

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