Politics, Economics, and Religion

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Politics, Economics, and Religion

Religion has so many connections to political and economic beliefs, there needs to be a place to identify linkages, problems, goals, options, action plans and evaluation criteria.  

Members: 100
Latest Activity: 15 hours ago

What is the purpose of life?

An eternal question, what is the purpose of life?, occupied philosophers’ thoughts throughout history. Stone pictographs reveal even primitive peoples reflected on this query. Each one has the capacity to define his or her personal thinking about politics, economics and religion.

Discussion Forum

Koch Bros ready to buy 2016 US election

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Loren Miller yesterday. 1 Reply

"Koch Bros have pledged to spend $889 million corrupting the next US election." (Quote from 350.org)The Koch network of conservative donors, anonymous and untaxed, now wields as much financial clout as both parties combined.…Continue

Tags: illusion of democracy, dirty money, Koch brothers

Religious fascism

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Alan Perlman on Saturday. 7 Replies

Continue

Tags: Saffron, Fascism", Christian, Hindu, fascism

Greta Christina: Why Being Liberal Really Is Better Than Being Conservative

Started by Grinning Cat. Last reply by Sky God Dec 31, 2014. 11 Replies

Worth a read! Greta Christina explains philosopher Rebecca Goldstein's observation on a fundamental difference between "liberal" and "conservative" core values, and why things aren't as simple as "agreeing to disagree" between two "equally valid"…Continue

Tags: purity, democracy, loyalty, authority, avoidance of harm

You Can't Educate People Into Believing in Evolution

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Loren Miller Dec 1, 2014. 4 Replies

"Hill found that religious belief was the strongest determinant of people's views on evolution—much more so than education, socioeconomic status, age, political views, or region of the country. More importantly, "Creationists are substantially more…Continue

Tags: confront, evolution, creationism, beliefs

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Comment by Grinning Cat 22 hours ago

p.s.: The Guardian article about Alexis Tsipras refusing a religious swearing-in also quoted a party activist who's a devout Orthodox Christian, who said that the new prime minister's 'choice of a secular oath was, paradoxically, an act of respect for the church and its integrity. Rather than appropriating religious rituals for political ends, as previous leaders had done, he was "ac­knowl­edging the sanctity of church services and behaving with respect to all of us (practising Christians)... Instead of him taking a false oath, we will offer him our sincere prayers."'

Comment by Grinning Cat 23 hours ago

In a dramatic break with tradition, Greece's new prime minister took a civil rather than religious oath of office.

From The Guardian: "Here’s the moment that Greek radical leftist party SYRIZA leader Alexis Tsipras signed the official protocols after being sworn in (using a secular oath) by president Karolos Papoulias."

From The Economist:

GREECE'S new prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, made history within hours of his victory by informing the Archbishop of Athens, very politely, that clerical services would not be required for his swearing-in ceremony. An avowed atheist who has nonetheless made a point of dealing courteously with senior clergy, Mr Tsipras lost no time in making known that his oath of office would be a secular procedure. It was also explained that when the whole cabinet was sworn in, a more junior cleric (but not the archbishop) would be invited to assist those who wished to take a religious oath.

It's hard to overstate what a rupture this marks with the ceremonial culture of Greece. For as long as anybody can remember, every senior office-holder, from socialists to right-wing dictators, has assumed the post with a ritual involving Bibles, crosses and often holy water, sprinkled about with a sprig of basil.

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on Tuesday

A few choice words from the Rude Pundit on Sarah Palin's speech at the recent Iowa Freedom Summit:

The most hilarious part of this is that conservatives are saying that the speech wasn't "serious" and that watching it was "painful." Joe Scarborough called it a "tragedy" that she had fallen so far, apparently not understanding the difference between tragedy and comedy.

Really . . .? This was the speech that made you decide Palin was not going to be president one day? 'Cause, see, the rest of us knew she was a fraud and a puffed-up idiot, a wannabe player, and a power-mad gorgon from the start. We didn't need this babbling cartoon character, this monster with a gaping maw, gorging on fame and attention like a snake on a rat, to blither through one more parade of faux folksiness, like Hee-Haw was her Critique of Pure Reason.

Comment by Idaho Spud on Tuesday

Comment by Idaho Spud on Tuesday

When I was young, I looked forward to the day that computers and robots did all the boring, unpleasant, unsafe work, and we all benefitted from their production, so we didn't have to work to provide for ourselves, but could do what interested us.

It's sad that the richest 1% have taken most of the fruits of that production, leaving the rest of us with very little.

Comment by Joan Denoo on Tuesday

Ruth, I am unable to see your most recent post. I know it contains something interesting/important. Can someone else send it to me, please. I am most grateful! 

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on Monday

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on Saturday

It looks like we have the Donald and Her Sarahship to look forward to again in the Republican presidential primaries. When it comes to this particular crazy train, the more the merrier methinks. With Mike the Huckster and the two Ricks, the entertainment level should go through the roof. C'mon Michelle, throw in your hat!

Comment by tom sarbeck on January 9, 2015 at 11:19pm

Please, folks, stop describing the US of A as "our democracy"!

From its start it has been, and still is, an oligarchy -- rule by a few.

The question to ask is Who comprises this oligarchy?

Campaign donors (the bribe givers and the extortion payers).

Comment by Grinning Cat on January 9, 2015 at 2:37pm

Wishful thinking, for some... one of the possible answers in Buzzfeed's "The Supreme Court Quiz":

16. Where does the Supreme Court meet? [Answer choices are pictures of the White House, the Supreme Court Building, Washington National Cathedral (highlighted), and the Capitol Building]

 
 
 

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