Politics, Economics, and Religion

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Politics, Economics, and Religion

Religion has so many connections to political and economic beliefs, there needs to be a place to identify linkages, problems, goals, options, action plans and evaluation criteria.  

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What is the purpose of life?

An eternal question, what is the purpose of life?, occupied philosophers’ thoughts throughout history. Stone pictographs reveal even primitive peoples reflected on this query. Each one has the capacity to define his or her personal thinking about politics, economics and religion.

Discussion Forum

Karen Armstrong is dangerous

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Sheeva on Wednesday. 17 Replies

"Karen Armstrong is dangerous. She’s dangerous because her blanket of tedious verbiage hides the truth that she wants us to completely ignore the dangers of religious dogma.  It appears that for her, there is no harmful dogma that can be pinned on…Continue

Tags: oppression, nihilism, politics, religious dogma, Karen Armstrong

Capitalism's Boom and Bust

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 18. 0 Replies

For the past 40 years, we have seen the erosion of safety nets for small business and wage workers. Income Gap between wealthy and poor grows, exponentially now.…Continue

Tags: wealth, poverty, bubble, WinCo, Walmart

It's Finally Official - Pope Francis Demotes Highest-Ranking US Cardinal Over LGBT Issues (Daily Kos)

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by Idaho Spud Nov 17. 23 Replies

It's been in the news. Now it has been confirmed. As of this past weekend, Raymond Leo Burke, America's highest-ranking cardinal at the Vatican, was officially removed from the Vatican's Supreme Court, and demoted to chaplain of the Knights of…Continue

Tags: cardinal, Raymond Leo Burke, LGBT, homosexuality, Pope Francis

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Comment by James M. Martin on August 12, 2014 at 5:34pm

@Tom. I think so. I went through a phase in my occult years of devotion to the principles of the Hindu and Buddhist tantrics, although my version of sadhana was a lot more complicated. I loved the sayings of tantric sages. For example, and I have substituted my own substances for western simplicity: "There is no difference between a palm's worth of chocolate and a palm's worth of shit." (Maybe William S. Burroughs had this in mind when, in one of his routines, he had the wealthiest family in America -- say, the Waltons -- taking their new son into the family board room. Or maybe it's that hobby store. And the president, probably his grandfather, takes into the board room shitter and says, sit there until you dump, money's not worth the shit from your body.) I cannot imagine why any human needs a billion dollars unless it is to feed his kleshas.

Comment by Tom Sarbeck on August 11, 2014 at 10:33pm

James,

I like existentialism. Therefore, the people you identify and the drunks or mentally ill sleeping under bridges have equally meaningful life purposes.

Comment by James M. Martin on August 11, 2014 at 10:18pm
Comment by James M. Martin on August 11, 2014 at 10:12pm

The only purpose of life is to do something worthwhile in it even if it doesn't directly help people, as with inventing an ebola vaccination. Poets contribute as much as epidemiologists, as do artists, composers, &c. All art is magic. All of our origins are chance events. What free will there is will always be helped or hindered by that one aleatory operation.

Comment by Tom Sarbeck on August 11, 2014 at 9:13pm

What Joan says about parents and children in different socio-economic classes is so very true. The consequences for the less advantaged children are tragically true.

And so:

1) the political conservatives' bootstrap talk, and

2) the religious rewarding-the-deserving talk,

are both euphemisms for social Darwinism.

They are correct in that giving effect to either or both will improve the gene pool.

The means they choose for that end horrifies liberals and perhaps progressives.

Do the opposing parties sit down and talk about issues that are not easy to talk about, or do they continue to attack each other?

Comment by Grinning Cat on August 11, 2014 at 5:35pm

Ruth, thanks for those very true cartoons and pictures!

On another note: people here might be interested in reading Joan's blog post "Not Everyone Has the Tools to Become Rich: How Our Childhood Shapes Our Ability to Succeed".

She discusses research with monkeys, and her own observations in teaching and counseling humans:

"Parents with resources, enough food, shelter, health care, education and discretionary money may have time to spend with their children, teaching them how to communicate, solve problems, resolve conflicts, they teach how to explore options, examine ideas, experiment with processes and take action that makes a difference. 

Parents without money resources, working several jobs, not spending time with their children, have difficulty learning these skills themselves and are unable to pass them on to their children. Some parents are so depressed and anxious that they may not work outside the home, and may not have the initiative to learn the skills themselves."

That's an important part of the conversation, with many political conservatives maintaining that everyone can and should pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. (And there are the religious overtones too, god rewarding the deserving and all that....)

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on August 7, 2014 at 8:06pm

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on July 30, 2014 at 9:58pm
Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on July 29, 2014 at 7:05pm

Delaying Climate Policies Could Cost U.S. Economy $150 Billion Each...

The White House’s Council of Economic Advisors (CEA) released a sweeping report Tuesday on the monetary costs of delaying action on climate change, and it had one glaring conclusion: the longer America waits to act, the more money will be stripped from the U.S. economy.
As with insurance, the report found that paying money over time to mitigate the risks of sea level rise, severe weather, drought, and other potential impacts of global warming would be far less expensive if done sooner rather than paying for the aftereffects later, and absolutely less expensive than waiting to deal with more catastrophic climate-related events.
Comment by Loren Miller on July 23, 2014 at 6:40am

Tom, like it or not, bad news outweighs good news.  It always has, and I suspect it always will.

 
 
 

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