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Politics, Economics, and Religion

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Politics, Economics, and Religion

Religion has so many connections to political and economic beliefs, there needs to be a place to identify linkages, problems, goals, options, action plans and evaluation criteria.  

Members: 101
Latest Activity: on Tuesday

What is the purpose of life?

An eternal question, what is the purpose of life?, occupied philosophers’ thoughts throughout history. Stone pictographs reveal even primitive peoples reflected on this query. Each one has the capacity to define his or her personal thinking about politics, economics and religion.

Discussion Forum

Atheists’ self-defeating superiority: Why joining forces with religion is best for non-believers

Started by Bertold Brautigan on Tuesday. 0 Replies

Steve Newmann's written the above titled article in Slate with the…Continue

There Is No Republican Middle

Started by Bertold Brautigan Mar 20. 0 Replies

In his Esquire politics blog, Charles Pierce today provided a nice bit of Santorum bashing along with an analysis of the unhinging of…Continue

The Most Dangerous Woman in America, Kshama Sawant

Started by Joan Denoo Mar 16. 0 Replies

Slowly, over the past 40-45 years, we have seen a levelling out of wage labor, a widening of the income gap, a reduction of the middle class, an increase of those living below the poverty line, and a takeover of government by moneyed interests. No…Continue

Tags: service, social, housing, tent, encampments.

Steve Shives, reviews "An Atheist Reads God's Not Dead" by Rice Broocks.

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Mar 13. 3 Replies

Steve Shives, in his usual robust manner, reviews "An Atheist Reads God's Not Dead" by Rice Broocks.Shive covers virtually all the claims of a believer attempting to replace confidence in science with holy scriptures and debunks fables that come to…Continue

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Comment by tom sarbeck on March 13, 2015 at 6:33am

If you do not know of the subsidies (taxpayer money) the government gives to businesses, do not read what follows. I don't want to wreck your innocence.

The "Free Market" label serves a purpose: it conceals the truth that from America's earliest years markets have been subsidized by taxpayers.

The first subsidy was the Revolution itself. Its costs paid by taxpayers, those in the business of selling land benefited.

Before the Revolution England had held the western lands (the Appalachians) for the Indians who lived there. With England out of the picture, the lands became available for development.

The Yazoo Land Fraud was next. The Wikipedia article doesn't tell of the years-long battle by a few members of Congress (the Tertium Quid) to prevent the costs being passed to taxpayers.

America's "free enterprise" system has always been, and it remains, a subsidy enterprise system. Today, the 99% subsidize the 1%.

I found parts of the story in histories of Congress: Asher Hinds' Precedents of the House of Representatives and Galloway's history of Congress. School histories have a different purpose: to make kids proud of America, willing to pay taxes and die in wars.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 12, 2015 at 10:40pm

Why Economists Cling to Discredited Ideas

"Free-market theory may be at odds with reality, but it fits the needs of the rich and the powerful.

"Despite the practical failures of free-market economics, too many mainstream economists have continued to embrace simplistic ideas about how the economy works. Such ideas are often rooted more in ideology than in evidence. These beliefs and the policies that follow led directly to the 2008 financial crisis and the Great Recession. They also centrally contributed to the nation’s subpar performance beginning in the late 1970s, and to our widening inequality. They continue to endanger America’s economic health."

"Science is universally true. The premise of economics as science was a great cover for conservative ideology. But one-size-fits-all economics, which best describes economic advice over the past 30 years, is a practical failure. Anti-government economics failed, pure and simple.

"Only a little seems to be changing. Targeting absurdly low inflation rates is still alive. One wonders whether regulation of finance will ever be adequate. The pressure for globalization is over-simplified, where one-size-fits-all policies are particularly damaging. We need economists who revise their theories based on evidence, but there is little room for reformers—few prestigious universities make space for heterodox thinking.

"It is hard to be optimistic about economics. Being an economist has become a career, though not an intellectual profession. Money talks loudly in their academic hallways, and a small-government philosophy still rules the nation, despite the calamities that began in 2008."

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 12, 2015 at 12:55pm

The Letter: Top 5 Similarities of GOP and Iran Hard Liners

"And, of course, Obama is right that the right wing of the Republican Party has things in common with hard liners in Iran."

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 12, 2015 at 12:44pm

An Open Letter to 47 Republican Senators of the United States of Am...

This letter, written by Will Saletan, pinpoints similarities between our nations.
"In Iran, all educational institutions are governed by our Cultural Revolution Council, which safeguards the faith of the people. We have been unable to locate such a council in your federal government. However, we recently learned that the state board of education in Sen. Cruz’s state, Texas, controls through its purchasing power the content of textbooks throughout your country. The board has used this power to limit the teaching of evolution and promote the celebration of your country as a Christian nation. Our cultural council protects Islam in the same way."

Some in the USA "promote the celebration of your country as a Christian nation.  Muslim 'cultural council protects Islam in the same way.'" 

Comment by Loren Miller on March 3, 2015 at 9:50am

The problem with Howard Zinn's words is that they collide head-on with the reality as described and accurately predicted by the movie Network.  The world has become a business, but instead of every citizen owning a share of stock, the various ownerships have been glommed up by the 1%, and they are loathe to relinquish their holdings.  This is further exacerbated by citizens who are disinterested in their citizenship.  They vote irregularly if they vote at all, and rather than keep informed in order to understand the state of their country and their place in it, they are distracted by the "wires and lights in a box" which Edward R. Murrow warned us about half a century ago.

We need an involved citizenry to solve this problem, but before we can even do that, we need to shake them out of their torpor and get them to care that there is a problem, even as Howard Beale tried in the above-mentioned film.  Problem is, Beale was killed for his efforts.

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on March 3, 2015 at 8:14am

The Rude Pundit's piece today is about Phil Robertson bringing Duck Dynasty wisdom to CPAC. It's not like we don't already know this, but he summed the situation up nicely.

The point here is not just to beat up on a rich man in redneck drag, a kind of cracker minstrel pushed out to dispense crazed backwoods wisdom. It's also to say that the crowd that embraced him (and right-wing websites were overjoyed with his speech) is never going to be won over by "logic" or "facts" or anything that we believe can be used to convince people. They are invested in a monolithic lie that some kind of Christian morality will make everything better.

Comment by Joan Denoo on February 12, 2015 at 9:50pm

Howard Zinn's words ring as true today as in 1970. We need the citizens of the world to unite. Do you remember the Workers of the World Unite? I wonder if that group is still alive? Perhaps it time ... no, it is past time to breath life into the Workers of the World. Those who benefit by Laissez faire capitalism, call those who disagree with them "Communists" "Pinkos", "Commies", "Liberals", "Socialists", "Reds",  "Leftists", "Nazis" and "Fascists".

Put any label you want to on people who work hard, pay their taxes, treat others fairly, pay attention to what happens when wealth is concentrated at the top one %. I, proudly, claim to be a worthy citizen of the w orld with concerns for all workers who support families and participate in communities as good members of society.

Comment by Joan Denoo on February 12, 2015 at 7:36pm
Comment by Plinius on January 30, 2015 at 9:24am

Would be as boring as the hours I spent in my parents' fundie protestant chuch. The one thing I learnt there was telling myself stories, writing poetry etc. while looking like someone who enjoys the sermon...

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on January 30, 2015 at 8:56am

From Valerie Tarico - 

10 Reasons Popular Versions of Christian Heaven Would be Hell

Why This Heaven Would Be Hellish

To many people the biblical description alone is enough to make Heaven sound unappealing, especially if you then add the company of noxious but professing public figures like Pat Robertson, Mel Gibson, Sarah Palin, Ken Ham, or Anita Bryant. (Why does God have such a bad marketing department?) But the problem isn’t just bad company. The closer you look, the more the Bible’s version of paradise seems like another version of eternal torture. Let me spell it out.

 
 
 

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