Birding, Birders and all things Birds

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Birding, Birders and all things Birds

This group is for birding, birders and bird enthusiasts. One can be a pet owner, researcher, Ornithologist, birder that is advanced or novice. Anyone interested in birds!

Location: Austin, TX
Members: 32
Latest Activity: Apr 11

Discussion Forum

What songbirds tell us about how we learn

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Apr 11. 1 Reply

When you throw a wild pitch or sing a flat note, it could be that your…Continue

Hummingbirds' 22-million-year-old history of remarkable change is far from complete

Started by Steph S. Apr 9. 0 Replies

The first comprehensive map of hummingbirds' 22-million-year-old family tree -- reconstructed based on careful analysis of 284 of the world's 338 known species -- tells a story of rapid and ongoing diversification. The decade-long study also helps…Continue

Pictures from my Coastal birding tip

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Joan Denoo Mar 9. 2 Replies

Recently I went to view the Whooping Cranes at a Wildlife refuge - putting up a few pics for everyone.…Continue

Massive seabird mortality reported in Atlantic

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Joan Denoo Mar 7. 1 Reply

March 2014: Following the severe storms of the last three months, more…Continue

A Bird Flies South, and It’s News

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Joan Denoo Feb 7. 2 Replies

DUXBURY, Mass. — The snowy owl seemed almost complacent, showing the…Continue

Disinfect bird feeders twice monthly

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jan 10. 5 Replies

Studying the evolution of virulence in bird disease, researchers discovered that virulence increases once a disease is established in an area. They suggest that evolution toward virulence is assisted by easy transmission around bird feeders.Bird…Continue

Tags: disfinfect bird feeders, avian disease virulence

Human Expansion Is Leaving Osprey of Canaries Cornered

Started by Steph S. Nov 29, 2013. 0 Replies

Nov. 21, 2013 — A team of scientists from the GOHNIC Association in the…Continue

Add Your Voice to Protect the Red Knot from Extinction

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Liz E Nov 26, 2013. 1 Reply

The Red Knot has one of the most impressive migrations in the…Continue

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You need to be a member of Birding, Birders and all things Birds to add comments!

Comment by Steph S. on November 24, 2013 at 10:55pm

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 24, 2013 at 10:35pm

6.6 cm is 2.59843 inches! They are lovely! and so tiny!

Here are Google images:

https://www.google.com/search?q=Tufted+Coquette+(+Lophornis+ornatus+)&espv=210&es_sm=119&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=0cmSUua5O6a5iwKaj4DoBw&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1235&bih=576&dpr=0.9

Comment by Patricia on November 24, 2013 at 7:11pm

That's hilarious Ruth!

Jetbird stream.....

Comment by Steph S. on November 24, 2013 at 6:43pm

Ruth and Tony!! Wow fantastic. Thanks for posting such wonderful bird pics. Ruth that one is really funny too. haha

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on November 24, 2013 at 11:47am

This is a take off from the ad.

Comment by Tony Carroll on November 24, 2013 at 11:21am

From the Wikipedia article

Tufted Coquette

    The Tufted Coquette ( Lophornis ornatus ) is a tiny hummingbird that breeds in eastern Venezuela, Trinidad, Guiana and northern Brazil. It is an uncommon but widespread species, which appears to be a local or seasonal migrant, although its movements are not well understood.

This small bird inhabits open country, gardens and cultivation. It is 6.6 cm long and weighs 2.3 g. The black-tipped red bill is short and straight.

The male Tufted Coquette is a striking bird. It has a rufous head crest and a coppery green back with a whitish rump band that is prominent in flight. The forehead and underparts are green, and black-spotted rufous plumes project from the neck sides. The tail is golden rufous.

The female lacks the crest and plumes. She has green upperparts, except for the whitish tail band, and rufous underparts which become much paler on the belly. The tail is mostly bronze green with a dusky band and whitish tips to the feathers. Immature males are like the female, but the throat is whitish with fine dark spotting.

The female Tufted Coquette lays two eggs in a small cup nest made of plant down and placed on a branch.

Tufted Coquettes are tame and approachable. Their food is nectar, taken from a variety of flowers, and some small invertebrates. The small size and steady flight means that this hummer often resembles a large bee as it moves from flower to flower. The call of this species while feeding is a light chik.

Comment by Steph S. on November 23, 2013 at 9:34pm

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 23, 2013 at 9:15pm

Patricia, Fantastic owl in flight; so graceful and focused. 

William J Gonzalez and Peter Cordel , I look forward to getting to know you. This is a great place for bird lovers!

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 23, 2013 at 7:19pm

That's fascinating how the owl tucks-in it's wings and tail at just the right moment, and expands them as soon as possible, loosing very little altitude.

Comment by Steph S. on November 23, 2013 at 5:07pm

Oh wow Patricia - I love that GIF. So beautiful.

 

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