Costa Rican Murder Shines Light on Poaching, Drug Nexus

Conservationist Jairo Mora Sandoval was murdered in Costa Rica on May 31.

The murder of an environmental activist in Costa Rica has shaken the country's ecology-minded public and has cast a light on what appears to be the growing overlap between animal poaching and drug trafficking on the country's Caribbean coast.

Early on the morning of May 31, masked gunmen abducted 26-year-old Jairo Mora Sandoval from a vehicle he was using to patrol a desolate beach to protect nesting leatherback turtles from poachers.

... belies the country's image as an eco-friendly tropical paradise, especially on the sparsely populated, impoverished Atlantic Coast.

People must find a way to live by whatever means they can."

For many people on Costa Rica's Caribbean coast, Sánchez and other officials say, that means trafficking in protein-rich eggs ransacked from turtle nests. Turtle eggs flavored with hot sauce are served in popular restaurants and sold by street vendors along the Caribbean coast.

At the same time, the poachers have been drawn into the tightening grip of drug runners coming north up the coast from Panama and Colombia in souped-up speedboats designed to outrun authorities.

... cash-strapped users are turning to turtle eggs to finance their addiction, even trading the eggs directly to drug dealers for powdered cocaine.

Poachers now brandish high-powered weapons that were rarely seen before on Costa Rica's shores, most notably AK-47s.

The very conditions that have made the area's beaches a favorite nesting spot for magnificent leatherbacks and other turtles—their remoteness and the lack of artificial light or human infrastructure—make them a haven of choice for smugglers and poachers.

And that makes them ever more dangerous for the environmentalists who are trying to save the critically endangered turtles.

"The poachers are always watching us from the trees," said Vanessa Lizano, head of Moín's Costa Rican Wildlife Sanctuary, who was a close friend of Mora's. "So if we hide the nests or move the eggs to another place on the beach, they find them anyway."

For Lizano and her colleagues, the preferred method is to gather eggs shortly after they've been laid—or even while the mother turtle is laying them—then bury them in a hatchery that's guarded by volunteers.

But one night last year, masked assailants raided the hatchery at gunpoint, confiscating cell phones and walkie-talkies while making off with the entire trove of 1,500 eggs.

Tags: drug addiction, drug smuggling, endangered turtles, poverty

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