Secular Coalition for America (Official)

Information

Secular Coalition for America (Official)

The Secular Coalition for America is an advocacy organization whose purpose is to amplify the diverse and growing voice of the nontheistic community in the United States.

Website: http://secular.org
Location: Washington, D.C.
Members: 376
Latest Activity: Jan 18

Secular Coalition for Arizona Kick-Off a Rousing Success

Secular Coalition for America Needs Your Leadership to Build More State Affiliates

“What an amazing night.”

The positive online comments keep pouring in!
The movement for a saner and more secular America is blazing a historic new trail, a trail that will lead to Secular Coalitions in all 50 states and the District of Columbia by the end of the decade. On October 12, we took the first exciting steps on that trail with the establishment of the Secular Coalition for Arizona, the first Secular Coalition for America State Affiliate.

To read more, click here!

Discussion Forum

Nebraska trying to organise despite wide open distances

Started by James Kz. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jan 19, 2013. 1 Reply

There were several people in Lincoln today meeting about trying to organise a state chapter of the SCA in Nebraska.Organising people over in Omaha and Lincoln (the state capital) is not too hard, the…Continue

Prayer god and Veterans Admin

Started by mike h.. Last reply by James Kz Oct 23, 2012. 3 Replies

Here we go, this may spur a conversation...I am a disabled vet and am offended at constantly hearing "No athiests in foxholes" .....  …Continue

The Good News Club or Truth Seekers Club

Started by Jeff Dempsey. Last reply by James M. Martin Jun 27, 2012. 1 Reply

This organization is a very serious threat to a "Secular Nation."  These people are using our tax dollars to go into school buildings after hours and teach this garbage to our children!  I'm sure…Continue

Tags: State, &, Church, of, Seperation

Launching A Campaign Against My City To Stop Prayer Before Council Meetings

Started by Jeff Dempsey. Last reply by Jeff Dempsey Jun 17, 2012. 5 Replies

I live in Southern, Ohio and the Bible-Belt runs strong through the hills in our community.  I frequent many city council meetings because of the corruption that has been within our tiny city for…Continue

Tags: State, and, Church, of, Seperation

Secular Coalition Latest News

5 Books All Atheists and Other Outsiders Should Read

Each of the books below changed my worldview and my way of thinking to varying degrees. They are listed in the order I read them — and all but the last I read before the age of 20, when most of us are probably more open to learning about and considering new ideas. 

download (6) 1. The Bible by authors unknown

I “knew” as a trusting child that the Bible was God’s word, and consequently the most important book in the world. I learned Hebrew in my Orthodox school by reading the Hebrew Bible (which we called Torah). We were praised for our ability to read fluently and follow rituals, but not so much for understanding what we were reading. Later we learned to translate and to converse in Hebrew. And, thankfully, my best Hebrew teachers encouraged us to question. And unlike Ken Ham, I found no answers in Genesis.

Teachers in my public school in the 1950s used to start the morning by reading biblical passages. One passage from 1 Corinthian 13:11 captured my evolving views about the Bible: “When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things.”Long before Judy Collins had any hit songs, I could say: I’ve looked at Torah from both sides now, from Orthodox Jew and atheist, too. But it’s Torah’s illusion I recall. I really don’t know Torah at all.

For better or worse, the Bible and the monotheistic religions it spawned have deeply influenced our culture and the world. For that reason alone, the Bible is worth reading. I regard it like Aesop’s fables, with some moral lessons and universal truths (along with talking animals). My problem isn’t so much with so-called holy books, but with adherents who take them literally. I’ve written hereabout the value I find in the Bible.

 

Continue reading at Faith Street >>

Prayer: What Is It Good For?

The 1969 protest song "War" asks "What is it good for?" and answers "Absolutely nothing!" If I substituted "Prayer" for "War," I would qualify my answer with "Almost nothing."

Prayer can be good for its placebo effect when believers feel they are doing something constructive, which might "cure" a psychosomatic disorder. On the other hand, replacing accepted medical practices with prayer has led to countless preventable deaths and injuries.

Many well-meaning people rely on prayer because it makes them feel upbeat when they don't know what action to take in a situation that is out of their control. Regardless of logic and statistical evidence to the contrary, fervent believers remain convinced that there is a god who listens to prayers. I've heard comments like "Sometimes our prayers are answered and sometimes they are not" and "God answers all prayers, but sometimes the answer is no."

Prayer can also be good for providing a sense of community to those who hope to achieve a desired outcome. But such prayers might not always be for outcomes beneficial to all, as depicted in Mark Twain's "The War Prayer," a prayer for the suffering and destruction of enemies, as typified by "O Lord our God, help us to tear their soldiers to bloody shred." This "prayer" was left unpublished until years after Twain's death because his family considered it too sacrilegious.

 

Continue reading at the Huffington Post >>

How Atheists Can Overcome a Reputation of Arrogance

I can empathize with religious groups whose mission is to convert everyone in the world, since I think the world would be better if everyone “saw the light” of secular humanism. But whether religious or secular, I believe the best form of proselytizing is to lead by example. I think Matthew 7:16 had it right — “By their fruits you shall know them.”

What follows are two lists that relate to atheist’s interactions with religious people. The first suggests ways we can change people’s views of atheists, and the second is about how, on some fronts, we’re not all that different from religionists.

Rather than seek converts to atheism, I think we atheists mostly want our worldview to be respected in a culture that has at least two pretexts for disliking us.

The first is that you can’t trust atheists because they don’t believe in a judging God who will reward or punish them in the afterlife.

This allegation is foolish and demeaning. I’ve been asked in conversations and on talk shows, “What keeps you from committing rape, murder, or anything else you think you can get away with?” My response is, “With an attitude like that, I hopeyou continue to believe in a god.”

 

Continue reading at Faith Street >>

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Secular Coalition for America (Official) to add comments!

Comment by Paul Fidalgo on April 7, 2010 at 2:24pm
Stand by, all. We'll be beefing up the official Secular Coalition for America group on Atheist Nexus soon. I promise it won't always be this much of a ghost town.

- Paul, communications manager
 

Members (372)

 
 
 

Support Atheist Nexus

Donate Today

Donate

 

Help Nexus When You Buy From Amazon

Amazon

AJY

 

© 2014   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service