How do you all feel about doctors who use their religion in the doctors office? Refusing birth control to patients because of their personal beliefs? What about pharmacists who do this?

Personally I feel they should not have the right to use their religion to interfere with someone elses chosen medical route. I believe if you are in medicine you should be serving science, NOT your religion, and I am appalled that doctors can legally deny people their prescriptions based on their own personal beliefs.

Anyone else have any personal experience with this? How do you feel about it?

Tags: choice, doctors, pro, religious

Views: 17

Replies to This Discussion

Thank you Larry, I have already looked into this and unfortunately the federal courts passed this as legal quite some time ago I believe, It's just another instance where we are coddling the religious and pampering them to their liking. If I ever see an opportunity to draw more attention to this, I will take it. Thanks again! :)
It's a total outrage. It's not "religious freedom", it's religious people's freedom to impose on everyone else. It's like going to a restaurant and the waiter refusing to serve you meat. You are entitled to your belief, but why should people be allowed to not do their job b/c of religion? Instead, they have the freedom to find a career that doesn't require them to do something they don't like. Maybe next doctors will be allowed to pray for people instead of operating on them?

I also am not sure of the legalities of this. Was it that some pharmacies would hire people like this, or was a law passed that employers couldn't fire/refuse to hire someone based on their refusal to give out birth control?

Does anyone have any statistics on how frequently this happens? I've gone to Rite Aid and Target and other places that got a bad rating from Planned Parenthood, but no one has looked at me twice about getting birth control. This could be just b/c I live less of a bible-belt area, but I think it's also that there are fewer people who are anti-birth control than people who are anti-abortion.

I had also read a good satire of this, where someone said the law doesn't go far enough, and people should be allowed to not serve coffee to women or let women go to gyms, because doing these things might keep them from conceiving. As a satire it was pretty great b/c it made it clear how sexist this really is. (And has anyone refused to hand out condoms? hah!)
Agreed. Also, getting fired for refusing to perform understood duties at work is something you should expect to be fired over--- not something you expect to hide behind your church over.
I went to a Catholic undergrad because I liked the programs offered. There were a surprising number of atheists. It was easy to forget it was a religious school, though, except for the fact that condoms were not handed out. The school's BACCUS organization wanted to bring in free AIDS testing and there was drama because the school told them no condoms were allowed and the organization offering the testing refused to put them away. They had to find another organization offering the testing who wouldn't give out condoms. >.X


On topic, the only time I had a pharmacist give me any trouble over my birth control was when I was going to school in Arizona (my first undergrad). He gave me the oddest look and stuttered a lot while trying to tell me how to take it. XD I'm on it for hormone reasons, though, not birth control, as immaculate conception isn't a common occurrence.
There's no need for AIDS testing b/c the school doesn't give out condoms? Love the logic.
A physician's first duty is to the care and well being of their patient. Refusing to prescribe birth control is a violation of that duty, and is, in my opinion, immoral. As to whether such conscience clauses ought be included as a matter of law, I think not. It is not a legal issue, and should not be brought into the law.

The opposing argument states that being compelled to prescribe (or dispense) birth control drugs or products is an unfair imposition upon the morality of the physician or pharmacist. Well, yes, it is. And thus the conflict.

The problem is that prescribing and dispensing of drugs is a highly regulated and restricted activity (as it ought to be; we don't want just anyone to be able to it). Because of this regulation and restriction, which serves the interest of the public, those who work within medicine must accept a limitation on the exercise of their moral conscience. Such limitation means the interest of the patient trumps any moral qualms they may have for what is a legal service and product.
I don't think it's restricted or regulated nearly enough. I believe there should be a distinction in which pills a medical doctor can give than a psychiatrist (or psychologist with proper training since 2002). It bothers me that my general practitioner could legally give me an antidepressant, despite a lack of intimate training in psychology.
The problem is that most people can't afford to go to a therapist, and they might still need antidepressants.
There are plenty of clinics available that offer free or sliding scale services. It's the fact that M.D.s are not trained specifically in accurately identifying mental illness and the side effects specifically of antidepressants, antianxieties, antipsychotics, etc.
I did get morning-after pills once and didn't get a problem. Has anyone else gotten emergency contraception?

It's really wrong that a person could end up pregnant b/c of someone else's stupid psuedomorality. But ironically, refusing to serve birth control and emergency contraception could lead more people to resort to abortion. If someone refused me, I'd be sure to tell them that.
These people consider plan B to be an abortificant, despite evidence to the contrary. So, to them, it's the same sin.
Come to think of it is there going to be anyone in "pro choice atheists" who doesn't agree that this is bullshit?

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