Politics, Economics, and Religion

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Politics, Economics, and Religion

Religion has so many connections to political and economic beliefs, there needs to be a place to identify linkages, problems, goals, options, action plans and evaluation criteria.  

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What is the purpose of life?

An eternal question, what is the purpose of life?, occupied philosophers’ thoughts throughout history. Stone pictographs reveal even primitive peoples reflected on this query. Each one has the capacity to define his or her personal thinking about politics, economics and religion.

Discussion Forum

The Tyranny of Growth

Started by Sentient Biped. Last reply by Joan Denoo 1 hour ago. 1 Reply

This issue comes to my mind a lot.  For anyone who works for any corporation, it must come up at some time.If there is a "10 Commandments" of capitalism, or a "10 Lessons of the MBA", the centrality of "grow-or-die" must be up there.  Maybe it's the…Continue

How much change can Pope Francis bring to the Catholic Church? (CBS News)

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by Tom Sarbeck 2 hours ago. 2 Replies

The "mass appeal" of Pope Francis was on clear view as he celebrated Easter at the Vatican this morning. Popular as he is, he is still just one man, and the church he leads is large and complex. Mark Phillips reports from Rome: It's not too…Continue

Tags: content, style, change, Pope Francis

Externalized risk rushing back to bite us in the

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on Tuesday. 0 Replies

As the 1% sucks up ever more wealth, the US infrastructure is ready to implode. To cut taxes on the ultra wealthy, we've rotted the physical and cultural supports upon which our society depends.…Continue

Tags: nuclear safety, chemical storage facility safety, maintenance, education funding, US infrastructure

MAN meaning Human, I assume

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Apr 12. 2 Replies

Thanks to WELCOME TO ECO-LOGICAL: A GROUP FOR ENVIRONMENTALISTS/ and moderator, Dallas the Phallus. Continue

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Comment by Joan Denoo on October 3, 2012 at 8:07pm

Furthermore, This is so terribly outrageously ignorant of not one, but four judges who overturned the conviction of a rapist! Absurd! I wonder, if any one of those judges had a daughter with cerebral palsy and mental capacity of three years, would their sense of justice have been different? 
I don't think this is a right or left issue! Justice, fairness, accountability weigh heavy on the minds and hearts of the liberals I know. So, we don't think the state should put citizens to death, we do think the state should hold people accountable and responsible for harming others and indeed, the state should provide protections for those who are unable to protect themselves.

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 3, 2012 at 7:49pm

Tony, this is terrible news! If courts don't know the word "NO" then why should a rapist? Besides, many counselors advise women to do what they believe will be safest for them, and if not resisting means less trauma, then that is what a woman should do. It is better to be raped and alive than raped and dead. Just common sense. 
If the judge were walking down a street and some thug held him up for his watch, rings, and wallet, should he resist? Or should he acquiesce and deal with remembering the face and features of the thug? 

Comment by Tony Carroll on October 3, 2012 at 6:02pm

 Think Progress Comments for TPR.

Court Requires Disabled Rape Victim To Prove She Resisted, Calls For Evidence Of ‘Biting, Kicking, Scratching’

 
Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on October 3, 2012 at 5:41pm

Comment by sk8eycat on October 3, 2012 at 12:08pm

Greg.  Oh.  I getcha.

Most of what I know about Roman methods of trials and punishments comes from reading Colleen Mc Cullough's "Masters of Rome" series.  I know that's fiction, but it's very well-researched (13 years before she started the 1st book!), so I believe she's accurate.  The only problem is that the novels only cover the last 100+ years of the Republic (and what ruined it...Cato and other hyper-coonservatives, and growth.), and Romans of that time had a horror of capital punishment.  The most extreme penalty (in Rome itself) was to throw the guilty party off the Tarpeian Rock.  Otherwise they were usually exiled.

A private citizen had the right to crucify one of his/her slaves.  Julius Caesar crucified 50 or 60 pirates who had captured him for ransom when he was in his early 20s.  And then there was the Spartacus-led revolt and its gruesome aftermath.

But during the time of the Republic, capital punishment of any kiind was rare.  I don't really know much about the empire.

Comment by Plinius on October 3, 2012 at 3:08am

I don't find stuff like that when I read about agnostics, anti-theists, atheists, Brights, freethinkers, humanists, secular humanists, skeptics, or spiritual humanists. Have you ever read or heard of violent supporters of these beliefs? A lot of them suffer at the hands of theists ... and non-believers certainly have been called all kinds of vile things.

And can I defend myself without descending to their level? I think that everybody has got a right to his/her own opinion, own body, own way to live or die - and those rights should only be restricted where they violate other's rights. I wouldn't know how to talk to theists, or how to influence them. I tried with my fundie parents, when they lived, but anything beyond "Would you have some more tea?" was spoken in a language they couldn't understand.

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 3, 2012 at 1:19am

"Are Christians Delusional?" Richard Carrier Skepticon 3

Richard Carrier author of "Sense and Goodness without God", "Proving History", and "Not the Impossible Faith". A Ph.D. in ancient history from Columbia University, he specializes in the modern philosophy of naturalism, the origins of Christianity, and the intellectual history of Greece and Rome, and ancient philosophy, science and technology.

Comment by sk8eycat on October 3, 2012 at 12:45am

Greg, I have a problem with that reference about Romans and crucifixion.  the author treats Jesus and Peter as actual people, and their crucifictions as historical events.  There is NO evidence for either.

Yes, the Romans crucified rebellious slaves, pirates, and others.  But there's no historical evidence for those two characters, and Saul/Paul who was the first person to write about Jesus never claimed that he lived and died anywhere on this planet.

I still wonder what would have happened if somebody who was ordered to carry his (or her) own crossbar said, "Up yours!  I'm not carrying that thing!" And stuck to it.  They may have flogged him mercilessly or run him through with a sword, but that would have either given him a quicker death, or left him too weak to carry anything.

Long before the Romans took over Judea, they would break a crucified person's legs as an act of "mercy," so they would die faster.

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 2, 2012 at 10:38pm

Timeline for the Crusades and Christian Holy War to c.1350

Is it not interesting that when we discuss religion, discussions of pain, torture, domination, and so much hate whether on the part of those who crucify christians, to those christians who burned, drowned, cut off noses, invaded in the countless Inquisitions. Underlaying all this blood and guts was control, power, greed, egos thinly veiled as devotion to their gods. They believe they are entitled to land, people, treasure and have the right to dominate any who got in their way. 

I don't find stuff like that when I read about agnostics, anti-theists, atheists, Brights, freethinkers, humanists, secular humanists, skeptics, or spiritual humanists. Have you ever read or heard of violent supporters of these beliefs? A lot of them suffer at the hands of theists ... and non-believers certainly have been called all kinds of vile things. 

Maybe we are just too lazy, or disinterested in such values. As for myself, getting up in the morning offers me opportunities beyond imagination, and I go to bed at night satisfied with my day. Perhaps I just have it too easy and don't know those who have a more difficult life than I. I do know I laugh when I think how ridiculous all these theists sound when they prattle.  Perhaps Ihould wear a mask to hide my disdain. 

In the meantime, I had an absolutely delicious bowl of clam chowder today. 

Comment by Loren Miller on October 2, 2012 at 10:02pm

I am I, indeed.

Fuck with me at your peril, because I will FUCK BACK, and I will not be pleasant about it.

 
 
 

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