Politics, Economics, and Religion

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Politics, Economics, and Religion

Religion has so many connections to political and economic beliefs, there needs to be a place to identify linkages, problems, goals, options, action plans and evaluation criteria.  

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Latest Activity: on Saturday

What is the purpose of life?

An eternal question, what is the purpose of life?, occupied philosophers’ thoughts throughout history. Stone pictographs reveal even primitive peoples reflected on this query. Each one has the capacity to define his or her personal thinking about politics, economics and religion.

Discussion Forum

Stingy Ebola Response

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Luara on Saturday. 2 Replies

Will a global Ebola pandemic eventually occur because we're all too cheap to contain it? Nobody's heard of "a stitch in time..."?…Continue

Tags: economics, Ebola

You fund Climate Deniers for Congress

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Tom Sarbeck Sep 14. 1 Reply

"I don't contribute to Climate Change Deniers!", you say? But do you use Google, Microsoft, UPS, AT&T, Ford or eBay? (For a more complete list of Climate Denier patrons -…Continue

Tags: corporate evil, corporate hypocrisy, Climate Denier hypocrisy, greenwashing

Neo-Liberal gut of health care soon to hit the fan

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Richard C Brown Sep 7. 2 Replies

Few news reports on the Ebola epidemic include the political and climate change context that created it. Many actually offer bland reassurance that first world countries could easily handle Ebola. In the US, rural areas are especially unprepared for…Continue

Tags: conservative priorities, hospital closings, emergency preparedness, Ebola

Free market creates monopoly - no market, no freedom

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Tom Sarbeck Aug 22. 10 Replies

Barry Lynn explains that a monopolist doesn't have to control 100% of a market. With the US having thousands of markets controlled as monopolies, we suffer the Economics of Destruction.What monopoly means is that a company has sufficient control of…Continue

Tags: free market economics, monopoly

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Comment by Joan Denoo on June 11, 2012 at 12:28am

S. B. Yes, If one does a longitudinal study of income inequality, the trends clearly show buildup of the middle class from 1945 to 1975 and then a flattening of wages to the present. For a long time it was hidden, and I didn't notice until I got my first computer in the 1980s and started doing stats analysis from Colonial days to present.

Your generation and mine had access to student loans and in your case of military service, access to education. I'm certain your "Herculean" efforts paid off for you and you probably don't regret the time and energy it took to complete your studies. I shudder to think of a "military enlistment, a willingness to be essentially an indentured servant for over a decade" 

 

"The chart below from Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) illustrates how labor’s share of income in the United States has plummeted while personal dividend income as a percentage of disposable income has soared since 2009."

Apple and Income Inequality in the U.S.

I wonder if enough people begin to realize this change over the last 35 years they will begin to look seriously at what underlies these changes? What attitudes changed? Why was labor income so undervalued and dividend income so overvalued? 

Comment by Sentient Biped on June 10, 2012 at 11:42pm

I don't know.  Maybe it's just because I'm looking, but it seems like there is growing attention to inequality in USA.  Like this Yahoo article I just saw.  I know it's possible to cross economic lines  - I did it - although it's taken a lifetime, the effort is Herculean, and the cost is more than most people can handle.  In my own case, it came about due to military enlistment, a willingness to be essentially an indentured servant for over a decade, and lack of dependents during most of that time.  I can't really recommend it, but in some cases it can happen.  Just not to everyone.

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 10, 2012 at 10:48pm

Clearly, money buys access to power. It is easy to understand why people who earn their living from investments want to and are able to spend personal money on elections; however, to see and hear working people and those who try to keep a family business going, it is harder to understand how they can be quiet in the face of current trends. 

We, you and I, may have seen the apex of a growing middle class. Perhaps this country will never see it again. However, I wonder if loss of economic and political power will quiet the yearning of people to have access to opportunity. I can't imagine a free and empowered people can settle for second class positions. Perhaps a yearning will brew in people who are not willing to settle for crumbs of society. 

“creativity is the key to education in its fullest sense and to the

solution of mankind’s most serious problems” 

~ Guilford’s (1967a p. 13)

Comment by Steph S. on June 10, 2012 at 10:36pm

Thanks for the email regarding the discussion. I will check it out.

Comment by Sentient Biped on June 10, 2012 at 8:53pm

Also, does it benefit the nation that so much of our political system is bought by the super wealthy?  npr.  ""It's the 1 percent of the 1 percent who account for almost a quarter of all individual campaign contributions,"

*

Why should the incredibly rare ultra wealthy individual, unelected, invisible, pull the nation's strings?  How are they held accountable?

Comment by Sentient Biped on June 10, 2012 at 8:49pm

Joan, having 50 billion dollars is so unthinkable and obscene.  Is there evidence that allowing such accumulation of wealth improves some sort of societal innovation?  Are we better in some way as a nation, to have people become so rich?   It seems to me the opposite, like the dog in a manger, sleeping on the hay - not allowing the other animals to eat the hay, even though the dog does not eat it either.

(Dog in a Manger, wikimedia commons)

Comment by Jessica Berman on June 10, 2012 at 4:20pm
Joan, any topic from you is guaranteed to have lively discussions. Thanks for the invite.
Comment by Joan Denoo on June 7, 2012 at 12:44pm

Koch brothers exposed

"Everything we do is within the law!"

Of course everything Koch brothers do is within the law, they wrote the laws and paid for the Congress to support their wealth, which means they took the money out of the pockets of small businesses and wage earners. These men represent the utmost in greed, theft, corruption and anti-USA values. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 31, 2012 at 4:16pm

Steph, thanks, I really enjoy your posts. 

Comment by Steph S. on May 31, 2012 at 3:23pm
I'm here! Thanks for the invite!
 
 
 

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