When our government is a government of wealth, it is irrational to think they would have concerns for un-wealthy. It is in their self-interest to have the advantage in wealth protection, control over taxes, wages and resist unions. The less democratic our government, the less power resides in the hands of wage-labor.

http://www.alternet.org/economy/new-study-finds-wealthy-are-differe...

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I can't say that it's much of a surprise that those who are rich take an "I-got-mine-you-can't-have-it" attitude, along with a determination to hang onto what they have.  Being that money equates to influence, it is also no surprise that those with money lobby those in power to favor their position, further insuring that their wealth position isn't compromised.  Meantime, those who are not as monied complain that those with it are taking an unfair advantage and turning what should be a democracy into a plutocracy, where money indeed talks and rather loudly.

Part of the solution to this equation is to get the top tax bracket back to something closer to where it was when Clinton was president, if not higher.  The problem is: who bells the cat?  The wealthy have the power of lobbying and will do everything they can to keep that tax rate where it is, if not push it lower yet.  Too many in Congress who are also well-monied have personal incentives to side with the lobbies.  Meantime, the middle class and below, who have been taking a beating over the redistribution of wealth that has resulted from all of this, are all but out in the cold.

It seems to me that, so long as money does talk in the field of politics, that this pattern will persist, and we will find ourselves not with a democracy but an oligarchy / aristocracy ... which is pretty much what we tried to get away from when the US was founded in the first place.

Here's some of what America's founders said in the 1787 Constitutional Convention, and the dates they said it:

In The 1787 Federal Convention

ELBRIDGE GERRY. The people are the dupes of pretended patriots, led daily into the most baneful opinions by false reports of designing men, which no one on the spot can refute. (May 31)

ROGER SHERMAN. The people should have as little to do as may be about the Government. They lack information and are constantly liable to be misled. (May 31)

ALEXANDER HAMILTON. The people seldom judge or determine right. Give therefore to the rich and well-born a distinct and permanent share in the government. (June 18)

JAMES MADISON. An increase of population will increase the proportion who labor under all the hardships of life and secretly sigh for a more equal distribution of its blessings. The government ought to protect the minority of the opulent against the majority. (June 26)

ROGER SHERMAN. Government is instituted for those who live under it and ought not to endanger their liberties. (June 26)

GOVERNEUR MORRIS. The second branch ought to be composed of men of great and established property--an aristocracy. (July 2) &

Men don't unite for liberty or life; they unite to protect their property. (July 5)

JAMES WILSON. The majority wherever found should govern the minority. (July 13)

JOHN MERCER. It is a first principle in political science that where the rights of property are secured, aristocracy will grow. Elective governments also become aristocratic because the rulers will draw advantage for themselves from the many. (August 14)

EDMUND RANDOLPH. We have in some revolutions of this plan made a bold stroke for monarchy. We are now doing the same for an aristocracy. (September 5)

JAMES WILSON. I fear aristocracy. (September 6)

GEORGE MASON. This constitution will begin a moderate aristocracy. It will probably vibrate between a monarchy or a corrupt and oppressive aristocracy then end in one or the other. (September 15)

 The Convention Adjourns

Search on "Max Farrand Records of the Federal Convention of 1787". Click on the link that mentions three volumes. Volume One has Madison's notes for the early weeks; Volumes Two his notes for the final weeks; Volume Three has writings by others.

Scott Prouty, who taped Mitt Romney's 47% remarks, was interviewed at length by Ed Schulz on MSNBC last night (3/15/13). Clips of that interview and others were on other MSNBC shows. The man deserves the highest non-military award America has. Check him in Wikipedia.

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