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Parenting Little Heathens

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Parenting Little Heathens

Atheists don't have a lot of parenting resources that speak directly to them. Come chat about all things parenting here.

Members: 977
Latest Activity: May 16

Welcome to Parenting Little Heathens

Hi moms and dads. Welcome to the parenting without religion group here at A|N. Please feel free to post an introduction, tell us about yourself or if you'd rather not, just jump right into any discussion.

Before you get started I would like you to be familiar with our Posting Rules and Guidelines. This will help clarify what this group is and what topics are appropriate or inappropriate.

Also, you might be interested in our list of atheist related parenting resources list. This is a work in progress, if you've found something you think is a good fit please post a reply and I'll see about adding it.

If at any time you would like to contact me, the easiest way is to send a private message through my page. However, in order to send any member a PM you must first be their friend.

Thank you for joining the group, I hope you enjoy being here.

-Dawn K

Discussion Forum

Omega-3 nutrition tied to social/emotional improvements

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner May 15. 0 Replies

Extra Omega-3s for young children significantly reduced depression and antisocial behavior, and even criminal behavior years later. I'd read a British study in which Omega-3 supplements improved the…Continue

Tags: child depression, child aggression, Omega-3 fatty acid

Live tweets from an abstinence-based "sex ed" class

Started by Grinning Cat Apr 17. 0 Replies

(OK, for not-so-little heathens...) Funny and horrifying -- Alice Dreger, a professor of medical humanities and bioethics, live-tweeted sitting in on her son's abstinence-based "sex education" class,…Continue

Tags: sex ed, abstinence-only, abstinence-based, awesome parents, sex education

Breastfed babies have less colic

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Feb 6. 0 Replies

Babies who were only breastfed had a smoother transition to solid food, in this study.Another breastfeeding…Continue

Tags: colic, breastfeeding

Helping kids handle the transition out of religion

Started by Amy. Last reply by John Hayes Dec 22, 2014. 1 Reply

Hi, I'm new to atheism, and I tried coming out slowly to my 6 year old son, but after his school christmas program, things sort of sped up on the car ride home. He really freaked out when I told him…Continue

Omega 3s during pregnancy diets determine that child's math scores

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Sep 11, 2014. 0 Replies

The current US diet, high in corn and soybean products, harms the brain of your developing fetus. Pregnant women need lots of omega 3's and a lot less omega 6's. Nearly half of the difference in…Continue

Children in megacities get brain damage

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Sep 11, 2014. 0 Replies

Air pollution harmful to young brains, study findsAir pollution in large cities damages children's…Continue

Tags: brain damage, air pollution

Protecting oxygen-deprived newborns

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jul 11, 2014. 0 Replies

Cooling protects oxygen-deprived infantsWe always fear our newborn being temporarily deprived…Continue

Tags: birth complications

Breastfeeding moms need 5,000 - 6,000 IU of D per day

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jun 21, 2014. 0 Replies

Vitamin D and the nursing motherHuman milk, in most nursing mothers, contains very little vitamin D. Infant…Continue

Tags: vitamin D deficiency in babies

Nursing mothers need 5,000-6,000 IU of vitamin D

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jun 8, 2014. 0 Replies

Vitamin D and the nursing motherAn "adequate" intake for nursing mothers is not the 400 IU/d the IOM…Continue

Tags: nursing, vitamin D

Comment Wall

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Comment by Wendy on June 1, 2009 at 8:59am
Again I ask---what's your authority on this? Do you know the minimum income needed to get financial aid? Hey guess what. NO ONES DOES. You fill out a FAFSA and wait. You might get a grant you might not. And then there's that little thing called EFC (expected family contribution). If you have family they can contribute, EVEN IF THEY WON'T, that'll be taken into account for your income.

grants are dolled out on financial need, and the money runs out WAY before everyone who has that financial need is taken care of. Most Pell awards go to families who make $20000 or less. So a HUGE section of the population is left out. So what's their other option...loans. And you're LUCKY if that covers tuition, much less other stuff. And I do believe (someone correct me if I'm wrong) credit scores are taken into account before the amount is given

I HATE this. It makes people who have tried to better their lives but cant' go to school seem lazy. oh you haven't TRIED. What do you know, it's not always that easy
Comment by Brenda on June 1, 2009 at 8:12am
I agree with Wendy. It is one thing to go $40-60K in debt when you are young and don't have dependents. But if you are raising children and no longer a spring chicken, it almost seems financially irresponsible to take on such debt, without the support of extended family, and especially in this economy.

College degrees are NOT a guarentee of good paying employment, that is for certain. It is a great advantage for young people looking for first time jobs, but I think experience far outweighs education when you get older, at least for liberal arts majors like me.

On the other hand, we all hear about stories of people overcoming extraordinary personal stuggles. It is possible, but there are many risks involved, I don't begrudge anyone for not wanting to assume such risks. Rags to riches dreams require determination, focus, ability, and some luck.
Comment by Wendy on June 1, 2009 at 7:51am
oooh I'm gonna have to break reality here. Money is ALWAYS the issue. Student loans have not and will not EVER cover the cost of college. When was the last time you checked out tuition? A state university will cost you at MINIMUM $10000k/year. Add in books, daycare or babysitting if you're a parent, etc etc etc.

To think that money just an obstacle that anyone can overcome in regards to college is rather elitist thinking
Comment by Angie Jackson on May 31, 2009 at 10:36am
I started college at 21, got pregnant, got married, chose to stay home with my son (and you know, do things like EAT and keep him in cloth diapers) and then went back when he turned 2. Went for another two semesters, racked up huge debt paying for tuition, books, and childcare, then got a really good job, dropped out of college, and just got laid off in February. And now I can't afford to go back to school. I've "chosen" college multiple times. I expect I'll have my bachelors before I'm 40, but possibly not much before then. And no, I wasn't a sanitation worker. I was an executive for an education company, managing three teams of people producing online professional development training courses for people who already had gone to college. Oh, and my CEO (one of the brightest guys I've ever met, although a prick) couldn't afford to graduate college either.
Comment by Bob on May 31, 2009 at 10:26am
I think we have a "Caste System" or class system in America just like anywhere else. Some people can move between classes, but its not that easy to do. I wanted post high school education badly and was willing to do whatever it took to get it. I joined the Army, got $20,000 for college in just 2 years service. Since I came from a family with no support of any kind, I wound up using college to learn what I should of learned in High School. I also spent more time in college because I had no idea what I wanted to major in.

Those kinds of issues are common for many college students. Usually the kids from the higher classes did better than people like me. I had nowhere to go in the summers, so my summer earnings went to immediate expenses, rent, clothes, etc. I was competing against kids who went back home to a rent free room, free food, free clothes, etc.

I racked up $20,000 in student loans, not due to financial mismanagement, but do to financial need. With interest and penalties I am still paying off $27,000 2nd mortgage which was my student loans.

I can very much relate to Carrie's situation, as mine isn't too much different. I don't pay rent, I pay a mortgage, but I have little equity, and the mortgage company owns the house. I pretty much live paycheck to paycheck, so if I lose my job, I could very easily lose the house.

However I don't begrude Sydni's at all. What she does with her money is her business. I go to museums and go out to eat myself. Perhaps not as often, but I go whenever I can.

It will be very difficult for me to put my little heathen through college some day, as I am still paying off my college bill. If my littel heaten attends college, it will be at the expense of even larger student loans that will hold her down in life as mine hold me down.
Comment by Wendy on May 31, 2009 at 9:40am
I gotta agree with Bob on this one. The college thing is bugging me. Unless I missed something, how can one assume that she didn't "choose" college? Maybe it was not possible for her to go? And even if you do "choose" college it's no guarantee that it'll make your life better. Ask the thousands of people out of work right now with college degrees or even post-grad degrees.
Comment by Bob on May 31, 2009 at 9:35am
I read the whole thread, and thought you both were fine. I didn't sense a big "fight" or anything. It was just a difference of opinion on a few things. I thougth you both were polite and nice about it.

This proves that class struggles exist for atheists/agnostics just as it does for anyone else.

Sydni, you made the comment about how you "chose college" as a way of making a better life for yourself. I find that to be a very interesting comment. I too chose college. However from my background that choice was and still is today a huge financial challenge. The education system is so over priced, tuition has risen far faster than inflation. I have a huge 2nd mortgage today because I used it to pay off my student loans.

Back when I was struggling in college, I noticed many Christian students getting all kinds of financial support, free place to stay, etc from their churches. I joined an atheist/humanist group that met up once a month for coffee and discussion, even though they were aware of my difficult situation, nobody offered me any help at all.

I'm still an atheist/agnostic, as there is no way I could believe the senseless teachings of any religion. One thing I have observed, many of the religious do come together and help each other out. I haven't seen anything like that among us atheists/agnostics.

Its probably one of the reasons there are large numbers of believers, they have ways of helping each other, meeting up & socializiing, etc. Atheists/Agnostics seem to be in their own little worlds apart from each other.

Its seems that "disbelief" isn't a strong enough bond to bring people together to the point where they are looking out for each other and helping each other out.
Comment by Angie Jackson on May 31, 2009 at 8:36am
Okay that's it: Sydni & Carrie - You're both my friends. Let's call a truce, alright? We all come to this place from different histories, lifestyles, and perspectives. Let's focus for the comment wall at least on the things we have in common and the things we agree on. Carrie, I think you're a wonderful mother. You spend as much quality time with your son as you possibly can and I know you love him more than life itself. And Sydni, you are too. You teach your kids a sense of stewardship and responsibility not often associated for those of us on the lower end of the economic scale with parents with resources. And hey! ALL OF US here on Parenting Little Heathens can agree that our kids have a huge advantage in not being raised with dogma. Some of us had that ourselves, and some of us had the opposite. But we've all come to the conclusion that we're going to love our kids, teach them how to think, and provide for them the best opportunities we have the means to.

So please, both of you, can you give it a rest?
Comment by Angie Jackson on May 30, 2009 at 6:31am
I live in Tampa, FL. Pretty much weather is the trump reason to live here, as we're large enough to have crime and parking/traffic troubles, but Southern and poor enough (cause all the old NYers come here to retire and vote against raising taxes for kids and native Floridians) that we only have a few good museums, our downtown is teeny tiny (6 "skyscrapers") and there are waaaaaaaay too many churches. Oh, and proceeds from our new Jesus license plates go to fund creationism education in public school. You should all be glad you're not stuck in the Land of Compromise: the worst of both worlds.
Comment by Bob on May 30, 2009 at 12:09am
Sydni, I have to disagree with your comment about small towns where you said they "lack culture" and "bordom of small town life".

For awhile I lived in a large city. I lived in Milwaukee for awhile. I lived in the Chicago area for awhile. Now I live in a small town. I love living in a small town. There are no traffic jams. I never have to hunt for a parking spot. Crime is so low, its almost non-existant. I know many people in town, and run into familiar faces all the time.

Life is not boring here, and it does not "lack culture". Its also nice not to live on top of each other. I actually have a nice size yard and an affordable mortage. I probably wouldn't have either one in Manhattan.

To me, overall quality of life is better in the small town. But hey, if your proximity to Manhattan works for you, thats great!

Where we choose to live, doesn't matter all that much. Its great that we are atheists/agnostics! This country has too many brainwashed people who believe in some pretty stupid things!
 

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