Child's Counting Comprehension May Depend On Objects Counted, Study...

The objects you use to teach counting make a difference in how well a child learns.

Concrete objects -- such as toys, tiles and blocks -- that students can touch and move around, called manipulatives, have been used to teach basic math skills since the 1980s. Use of manipulatives is based on the long-held belief that young children's thinking is strictly concrete in nature, so concrete objects are assumed to help them learn math concepts.

However, new research from the University of Notre Dame suggests that not all manipulatives are equal. The types of manipulatives may make a difference in how effectively a child learns basic counting and other basic math concepts.

Objects that are brightly colored, unusually textured or highly dimensional may capture children's attention and help children stay focused on the given task.

However, the researchers found that when children already were familiar with the objects, then these perceptually detailed objects actually hindered performance on counting tasks because they require dual representation ...


 

When children already have established knowledge of the objects, this increased attention often is directed to the objects and their known purpose rather than to the mathematical task at hand. Conversely, when children didn't have established knowledge of the objects, perceptual richness helped performance. [emphasis mine]

Tags: learning to count

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Enjoyed reading that Ruth.

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