The full article is at www.telegraph.co.uk/.../Foster-parent-ban-no-place-in-the-law-for- Christianity-High-Court-rules.html

Abbreviated extracts follow:

    There is no place in British law for Christian beliefs, despite this country’s long history of religious observance and the traditions of the established Church, two High Court judges said . . .  Lord Justice Munby and Mr Justice Beatson made the remarks when ruling on the case of a Christian couple who were told that they could not be foster carers because of their view that homosexuality is wrong . . .

    The judges underlined that, in the case of fostering arrangements at least, the right of homosexuals to equality “should take precedence” over the right of Christians to manifest their beliefs and moral values. In a ruling with potentially wide-ranging implications, the judges said Britain was a “largely secular”, multi-cultural country in which the laws of the realm “do not include Christianity” . . .

    The ruling in the case of Owen and Eunice Johns . . .  is the latest in a series of judgments in which Christians have been defeated in the courts for breaching equality laws by manifesting their beliefs on homosexuality. In their ruling, the judges complained that it was not yet “well understood” that British society was largely secular and that the law has no place for Christianity. “Although historically this country is part of the Christian West, and although it has an established church which is Christian, there have been enormous changes in the social and religious life of our country over the last century.”  . . .

    The Rt Rev Michael Nazir-Ali, the former bishop of Rochester, described the judgment as “absurd”. . . . “To say that this is a secular country is certainly wrong . . . However, what really worries me about this spate of judgments is that they leave no room for the conscience of believers of whatever kind. This will exclude Christians, Muslims and Orthodox Jews from whole swaths of public life, including adoption and fostering.”

    Speaking personally, Canon Dr Chris Sugden, the executive secretary of Anglican Mainstream, said the judges were wrong to say religion was a matter of private individuals’ beliefs: The judges "are treating religion like Richard Dawkins does, as if Christian faith was on a parallel with Melanesian frog worship. . . . 

 

    What is being done in the U.S. on such matters?

Tags: Melanesian frog worship, Secular Britain, fostering, homosexual laws

Views: 126

Replies to This Discussion

Heh heh heh.

Well, frogs must count as gods in Melanesia (even if they can't count)

because somebody said so---and that's all a believer needs. Believers never need proof. Irrationality is sufficient reason which is what makes christians and muslims happy.

 

and frog worshipers!

so its not that they are equally O.K. with a sound logical argument. it starts form a damaged premiss.

just because frogs exist, and some have deluded themselves into thinking that these creatures are somehow "divine" doesnt mean that these frogs ARE gods.

its more proven, I think that they are equaly driven by ignorence, superstition and quite possably brain damage.

so....you may be a "frogist" but not a theist.

but the frogs probably realy love it.

I expect the frogs benefit greatly insofar as, being viewed as gods, they probably do not get eaten.
On the other hand we recall that christians are good at thinking they are eating bits of their god, so perhaps the Melanesian tree frogs are not so safe after all.

"In the last days, the Antichefs will rise up in a land called France and seek to devour Us"

~Kermit 9:22

Frogs fighting Frogs ? Sounds like another sectarian holy war....

 

Antichefs or Swedish Chefs?!?

 

 

So the Swedish Chef never made frogs' legs ... so sue me! [grin!]

On a serious note, it raises the question of the limits on foster carers with regard to religious indoctrination in general. Prejudice against homosexuality aside, is it OK for foster carers to actively attempt to indoctrinate the child in their religious beliefs? Have the courts ever ruled on this?

I thought they just did. They see their homophobia as part of their religion, so the courts said no, thou shalt not propogate homophobia.

 

M.

This is awesome.  Why the hell can't we get court rulings like this in the US?

 

The Rt Rev Michael Nazir-Ali, the former bishop of Rochester, described the judgment as “absurd”. . . . “To say that this is a secular country is certainly wrong . . . However, what really worries me about this spate of judgments is that they leave no room for the conscience of believers of whatever kind. This will exclude Christians, Muslims and Orthodox Jews from whole swaths of public life, including adoption and fostering.”

 

Yes, exactly, and that's good.  Western society has progressed beyond your bronze age bigotry.  Don't you think it's time you did so, along with the rest of us?

 

I mean Christ, can you imagine if a family ended up with a kid who turned out homosexual?  Not good.  It's bad enough when biological parents abuse their kids by sending them to camps and programs to "cure" their homosexuality.

I think that because of the religious right is so tied in with, and has populated, if you will the political right that this kind of rulling in this coutry may be a long way off.

the judeo-christ culture is so engrained in our laws, social structure, and polotics and still somehow outside of critisizm.

england has had a state madated religion for so long that, being right up against each other for so long that the contrast between them has been more and more painfully obvious.

so what we are now seeing is the awakening of real morality driven laws that so obviously trump religious driven mandates that the powers that be can no longer assume that the religious driven mandates can possibly be good for society.

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