Observatory in Atacama to be able to match views from space based telescopes such as the Hubble.

Gazing into the furthest reaches of the universe could become a whole lot easier, thanks to a new telescope invented in Chile, which has been been referred to by experts as the astronomy capital of the world.

Located at an observatory in the Atacama Desert, it is the first earth-based telescope that is able to match views from space-based telescopes such as the Hubble.

Tags: humanity, mars, moon, science, space, universe

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Hmm, region block on the video.  Can't watch that one in the US, apparently.

The video is functioning normally in Britain. 

I'll see what I can do

Okay ... now THAT works.  Good stuff, Napoleon!

Ohhhhhhhh, you meant two boxes up in the original post.  I thought you meant you had a nonfunctional plugin box for both the initially posted video and the new one he added here.

Odd.  I just have a single black box with the words, "THE VIDEO YOU ARE TRYING TO WATCH CANNOT BE VIEWED FROM YOUR CURRENT COUNTRY OR LOCATION."

Narf? Is that You?

Heh heh heh.

Yeah, that's me, over on FTB.  Hey, man.

Video worked fine for me. Excellent.

This is good news. With NASA's budget being cut it is great to find other ways to look into deep space. These images do appear to be as strong as those from the Hubble. It that true? Are they as good?

Based on what I heard from the video, they've come up with a means to at least partially compensate for atmospheric blurring of images.  I heard mention of lasers; it may be they map the flow of air in the immediate vicinity of the viewing range of telescope and create an algorithm to digitally correct for the light dispersion.

Very cool stuff.

My understanding is that the conditions aren't quite as good, since it's hard to get better atmospheric conditions than getting outside of the atmosphere.  But on the ground, you can build better telescopes, since size and mass aren't as much of a consideration, and it's easier and cheaper to update them, when you design better components.  So, stick it on a mountain, in an area with low atmospheric pollution, and you're probably coming out way ahead, particularly after the thing is 5 or 6 years old and has gone through a few improvements, while the one in orbit is still working with its initial components.

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