CHARLES DARWIN YEAR, Part 1. A Memorial Calendar

December 27, 1831. The HMS Beagle, captained by Fitzroy, set sail from England for a 5-year natural-history voyage around the world. It was a 10-gun brig, 100 feet (30 metres) long. Darwin shared a small cabin in the poop with two other men.
January 7, 1860. Publication of the second edition of “On the Origin of Species”. 3000 copies were printed.
January 12, 1836. HMS Beagle arrived in Sydney, Australia.
January 16, 1836. Charles Darwin left for Bathurst, about a hundred miles west of Sydney. He commented that the lack of kangaroos indicated how European settlement had interfered with wildlife.
January 24, 1839. Darwin elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society.
January, 29, 1839. In Maer, Staffordshire, Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood, granddaughter of the founder of the Wedgwood China firm
February 6, 1796. Birth of John Stevens Henslow (died 1861), who was Darwin’s natural-history tutor at Cambridge University. It was he who recommended Darwin as a suitable companion for Captain Fitzroy on Beagle.
February 10, 1869. Publication of the fifth edition of “On the Origin of Species”. For the first time Herbert Spencer’s phrase, “survival of the fittest”, was introduced.
February 12, 1809. Birth of Charles Darwin at The Mount, Shrewsbury in Shropshire.
February 19, 1872. Publication of the sixth edition of Darwin’s great book. Its name was changed to “Origin of Species”. For the first time the word “evolution” was used.
February 28, 1832. Charles Darwin set foot on the continent of South America. The beauty of nature there led him to speak of it as a “chaos of delight”.
March 7, 1837. Charles Darwin left Cambridge to live in Great Marlborough Street, London. There, he wrote “… I gradually came to disbelieve in Christianity as a divine revelation”.
March 9, 1869. Publication of Alfred Russel Wallace’s book “The Malay Archipelago”. The book chronicles his travels and scientific explorations. It was dedicated to Charles Darwin.
March 20, 1835. On climbing the Andes at Valparaiso, Charles Darwin found petrified trees similar to those at sea level. He recorded how he was certain that the mountains rose “slowly and by little starts”.
March 25, 1861. Publication of the third edition of “On the Origin of Species”. Added is a historical introduction listing the precursors of evolutionary thinking.

(to be continued).

Tags: Alfred Russel Wallace, Beagle, Charles Darwin, Origin of Species, evolution, survival of the fittest

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Replies to This Discussion

This is great! I am taking a Human Evolution course at Belmont Abbey (yes the Abbey teaches these type classes!) and we are studying Darwin more in depth now. I found it interesting and ironic that the Beagle's mission was to essentially spread religion, and that the earth was unchanging. Lucky for us, Darwin was observant enough to bring forth disputing evidence. His doubts about the fixidity of organisms are proven, and natural selection exists, as does evolution (which he did not mention in Origin of Species, but later in the last line of The Descent of Man). Thanks to great men like Wallace and Darwin! Thanks for the post Dr. Meaden.
If you have not already seen it, read my homage to Charles Darwin and his 19th century science friends. The article is within these pages, just a few items back.

http://www.atheistnexus.org/group/originsuniverselifehumankindandda...
I will do that now. Off I go...
You will note that I introduced the principal archaeologists of the 19th century into this homage (as I am an archaeologist). They are rarely brought into these discussions about 19th century views on evolution but they deserve to be there too.
I did notice that you mentioned Alfred Russel Wallace, and I commend you for that. Not many people know that he in fact, had the same ideas as Darwin, if not before Darwin, and that Darwin read his manuscript and was amazed at the similarities in natural selection and evolution. He was very modest to have let Charles have the fame. I still have yet to finish, I am trying to finish with another assignment so that I can enjoy the Homage!
Are you referring to Belmont Abbey? If so, yes, it's about 10 minutes from there.

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