Information

LOVERS OF SHAKESPEARE

LOVERS OF SHAKESPEARE is a group for fans of the Bard. Topics are open to just about anything Shakespeare.

Members: 83
Latest Activity: May 5

Welcome to Lovers of Shakespeare

To be or not to be, that is the question;
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing, end them. To die, to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to — 'tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep;
To sleep, perchance to dream. Ay, there's the rub,
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause.


External Links
Internet Shakespeare Editions
Shakespeare Birthplace Trust
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare
Royal Shakespeare Company
Simply Shakespeare

Discussion Forum

Shakespeare: Original pronunciation

Started by A Former Member Nov 10, 2012. 0 Replies

Sonnet 109, read by Susannah York

Started by A Former Member Nov 10, 2012. 0 Replies

To Be or Not to Be Shakespeare

Started by A Former Member Nov 14, 2011. 0 Replies

William Shakespeare, Gangster

Started by A Former Member Nov 9, 2011. 0 Replies

Sonnet 43

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by A Former Member Nov 5, 2010. 2 Replies

Did Shakespeare Want To Suppress His Sonnets?

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by A Former Member May 24, 2010. 3 Replies

"Fear no more," from Cymbeline

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by A Former Member Mar 22, 2010. 2 Replies

Centuries later, lost Shakespeare 'found'?

Started by A Former Member Mar 16, 2010. 0 Replies

Re-Imagining Shakespeare for the 21st Century

Started by Christopher Wilton. Last reply by Jaume Dec 29, 2009. 5 Replies

Jude Law, Tackling Hamlet From The Inside Out

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by A Former Member Oct 15, 2009. 3 Replies

Roof over Shakespeare's bones risks collapse

Started by A Former Member Sep 21, 2009. 0 Replies

Alternate punctuation in Shaky's most famous quote

Started by Jaume. Last reply by Lynne Williamson Aug 20, 2009. 6 Replies

What did Shakespeare think of religion?

Started by D'Holbach. Last reply by A Former Member Aug 12, 2009. 10 Replies

Villains in mainstream culture

Started by Jaume. Last reply by Jaume Aug 10, 2009. 3 Replies

Jude Law as Hamlet

Started by Elessarina. Last reply by Elessarina Aug 8, 2009. 4 Replies

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of LOVERS OF SHAKESPEARE to add comments!

Comment by A Former Member on September 10, 2009 at 2:08pm
@Jaume, though Timons does sound like an interesting historical figure.
Comment by Jaume on September 10, 2009 at 2:02pm
@Dallas: yes, although I skipped bits here and there. I found it boring at times. His worst play I've read so far.
Comment by A Former Member on September 10, 2009 at 12:20pm
@Rikka: Othello is not my favorite, but after listening to this, I feel like I understand it better. I recommend it.

@Jaume: Thanks for the info on Timon. I've not read that play. Have you?
Comment by Rikka on September 10, 2009 at 12:02pm
I'm taking a Shakespeare: Tragedies class this semester. We traditionally get to choose one tragedy and one dark comedy of our curriculum and for serious the kids in my class chose Othello [for the tragedy] and I was quite unhappy. I am in severe dislike with that play. D:
Comment by Jaume on September 7, 2009 at 8:40am
Did you know Timon of Athens is based on a real character? Here's what Plutarch wrote about him:

This Timon was a citizen of Athens, and lived much about the Peloponnesian war, as may be seen by the comedies of Aristophanes and Plato, in which he is ridiculed as the hater and enemy of mankind. He avoided and repelled the approaches of everyone, but embraced with kisses and the greatest show of affection Alcibiades, then in his hot youth. And when Apemantus was astonished, and demanded the reason, he replied that he knew this young man would one day do infinite mischief to the Athenians. He never admitted anyone into his company, except at times this Apemantus, who was of the same sort of temper, and was an imitator of his way of life. At the celebration of the festival of flagons, these two kept the feast together, and Apemantus saying to him, "What a pleasant party, Timon!" "It would be," he answered, "if you were away." One day he got up in a full assembly on the speaker's place, and when there was a dead silence and great wonder at so unusual a sight, he said, "Ye men of Athens, I have a little plot of ground, and in it grows a fig-tree, on which many citizens have been pleased to hang themselves; and now, having resolved to build in that place, I wished to announce it publicly that any of you who may be desirous may go and hang yourselves before I cut it down." He died and was buried at Halae, near the sea, where it so happened that, after his burial, a land-slip took place on the point of the shore, and the sea, flowing in, surrounded his tomb, and made it inaccessible to the foot of man. It bore this inscription:

Here am I laid, my life of misery done.
Ask not my name, I curse you every one.

And this epitaph was made by himself while yet alive; that which is more generally known is by Callimachus:

Timon, the misanthrope, am I below.
Go, and revile me, traveler, only go.
Comment by A Former Member on September 6, 2009 at 5:18pm
Shock and caw: Pesky starlings still overwhelm

SALT LAKE CITY – The next time the sky darkens with a flock of noisy unwelcome starlings, blame Shakespeare — or, better yet, a few of his strangest fans.

Had the Bard not mentioned the starling in the third scene of "Henry IV," arguably the most hated bird in North America might never have arrived. In the early 1890s, about 100 European starlings were released in New York City's Central Park by a group dedicated to bringing to America every bird ever mentioned by Shakespeare.

Today, it's more like Hitchcock.

Read more.
Comment by A Former Member on August 12, 2009 at 5:11pm
@ Rikka: I was agreeing with you!
Comment by Rikka on August 12, 2009 at 5:04pm
we're all entitled to our opinions, Dallas :P

There's also the 1999 Midsummer's Night Dream and maybe some of the Henry's were redone in the '90s as well? I can't recall.
Comment by A Former Member on August 12, 2009 at 1:00pm
@ Rikka: Nobody "can top the Olivia Hussey/Leonard Whiting pairing of Zefrirelli's version... "
Comment by Rikka on August 12, 2009 at 12:53pm
I think Romeo+Juliet was made to be enjoyed by us youngins :P Though I do wish Clare Danes hadn't been picked for Juliet... Leonardo DiCaprio did a fairly decent job, though I'm not sure that anyone can top the Olivia Hussey/Leonard Whiting pairing of Zefrirelli's version...
 

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