LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS

Information

LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS

LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS is a group for people who love languages, words, and grammar.

Members: 215
Latest Activity: Aug 25

WELCOME TO LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS

LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS is a group for people who love languages, words, and grammar.

The only requirement for joining this group is that you possess a modicum of interest in languages, etymology, grammar, punctuation, and pronunciation. You do not have to be erudite or scholarly; you do not have to be a linguist or grammarian. You just have to have the desire to learn new things about language, or share the knowledge you possess.

The purpose of this group will be to help us explore the diversity of language, hone our grammar and spelling skills, understand correct word usage, expand our vocabulary, explore language and word history, and find new ways to communicate.

How we talk about things is equally important as what we talk about. Language is a part of our thinking, speaking, and writing; it is mind, tongue, and hand. It is about how we relate to other people and understand the world around us. It is communication and the exchange of ideas. It is learning, empathy, history, and politics. It can persuade, disarm, conquer, cajole, unnerve, offend, shame, enrich, encourage, inspire, destroy, or sustain. It is all these things and more.

However, the emphasis of LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS is not on writing and publication. If you are interested in these topics, please join the group ATHEIST WRITERS. That does not mean that you cannot ask questions about writing here, it is just that we are not trying to compete with the well-established writer's group. I simply recommend that you use your best judgment and post your discussion in the group that best fits the topic.

The focus here will obviously be on the English language, but it is not restricted to English only. Topics can include correct spelling and grammar issues, etymology, vocabulary and usage, language history and lexicography, dialects and idioms, trivia, and resources such as books and websites.


Books & DVDs:
The Adventure of English (DVD)
The Bedford Handbook
The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations
Eats, Shoots & Leaves
Fowler's Modern English Usage,
Globish: How the English Language Became the World's Language
Gossip, Grooming, and the Evolution of Language
Metaphors We Live By
Modern American Usage: A Guide
The Mother Tongue
The Mountain Man's Field Guide to Grammar
Origins
Philosophy in the Flesh
Speaking in Tongues: The History of Language
The Story of Human Language
The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature
There's a Word for It


Other A|N groups of interest:

Nexus Book Club
Atheist Librarians
Athiest Writers


External Links:
Dictionary.com
Thesaurus.com
Reference.com
Wold Wide Words
Modern Language Association
PrefixSuffix.com
DrMardy.com
DrGrammar.org
AskOxford.com
Common Errors in English
The Global Language Monitor
Guide to Grammar and Style
The Elements of Style
How to Speak and Write Correctly
World Wide Words
Online Etymology Dictionary
The Rosetta Project
The Phrontistery
Charles Harrington Elster

Discussion Forum

One Letter Words, a Dictionary

Started by Tom Sarbeck Aug 7. 0 Replies

Emotionally loaded vowels

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat Aug 1. 1 Reply

Decline in writing accuracy.

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat May 4. 38 Replies

Automatic captions and fiberglass growth factor

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Loren Miller Feb 23. 2 Replies

Changes to word meanings.

Started by Idaho Spud. Last reply by Dogly Feb 7. 4 Replies

Typos and Other Sources of Humor

Started by Glenn Sogge. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Nov 26, 2013. 162 Replies

Sex Symbols

Started by A Former Member May 26, 2013. 0 Replies

18 obsolete words, which should never have gone out of style

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by A Former Member May 7, 2013. 7 Replies

A Man of Many Words

Started by A Former Member May 7, 2013. 0 Replies

Rape culture embedded in language

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat Mar 8, 2013. 1 Reply

Txtng and the future of English

Started by Grinning Cat Mar 3, 2013. 0 Replies

Who dunnit? The not-so-insignificant quirks of language

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Feb 24, 2013. 8 Replies

Two layers of language

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Feb 22, 2013. 0 Replies

Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by A Former Member Jan 5, 2013. 2 Replies

Text-mining stylistic and thematic connections

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Steph S. Aug 28, 2012. 1 Reply

How does Our Language Shape the Way We Think?

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Aug 7, 2012. 27 Replies

A brief history of four letter words

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jun 1, 2012. 1 Reply

Throw Grammar from the Train

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Comment Wall

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You need to be a member of LINGUAPHILES & SESQUIPEDALIANS to add comments!

Comment by A Former Member on September 4, 2009 at 12:25pm
Question of the day, from Dictionary.com:

Q: What is the difference between regret and remorse?

A: Regret describes emotions ranging from being disappointed to intense sorrow due mainly to an external circumstance or event. An example is: She regrets that the television show has been canceled. One can also regret a wrong done, as in: He regrets his mistakes. Remorse describes deep regret, involving anguish or guilt and self-reproach or repentance. Remorse is felt by someone for a sin or wrong they have committed. So: He felt remorse for lying to the teacher. Remorse is from the Latin remordere 'to bite again' - as remorse is a gnawing feeling of guilt from a past wrong. Regret is from the French regreter/regrater and originally was a synonym for regrate meaning 'complaint, lament'.
Comment by A Former Member on September 1, 2009 at 6:49pm
Question of the day, from Dictionary.com:

Q: What is the difference between nuclear and atomic?

A: The atom is the smallest identifiable unit of matter. It has a nucleus which contains one or more protons and then one or more electrons orbiting in outer layers. The word nuclear in the phrase 'nuclear bomb' means 'involving or related to atomic nuclei or an atomic nucleus'. The phrase in that sense can be used interchangeably with 'atomic bomb'. The two terms are synonymous when modifying energy and weapons terms. However, when talking about energy level or physics, nuclear denotes the dynamics of particles in the core of an atom, including the protons and neutrons. When talking about energy level, physics, or chemistry, atomic denotes the configuration of electrons that determines the chemistry of an atom and the dynamics of the particles in the outer layer, the electrons. In describing weapons, though, nuclear is a general term for weapons that release energy from nuclear reactions. Atomic refers to the earliest and least sophisticated weapons, which use nuclear fission. Then there is thermonuclear. Thermonuclear weapons use nuclear fusion, which results when the nuclei of hydrogen isotopes merge and release energy. Fusion takes place only at very high temperatures, so thermonuclear devices first set off a fission reaction, which triggers the fusion; some weapons have two fusion stages, the first initiating the second. In describing physics, atomic physics deals with the properties of atoms, which are mainly due to their electron configuration. Nuclear physics, on the other hand, deals only with nuclei. It studies the structure of nuclei, and their reactions and interactions.
Comment by A Former Member on August 31, 2009 at 11:47am
Question of the day, from Dictionary.com:

Q: What is the difference between a monologue and a soliloquy?

a: In origin, the words are doublets: Greek monologue and Latin soliloquy both mean 'single speech'. But they are now distinguished in performances with monologue as a speech made by one person in the company of others while a soliloquy is spoken by one person who is alone. A monologue is a long speech delivered by one person who forgets or neglects the others who are there, with an example being "The Vagina Monologues." Hamlet's "To be or not to be" is a great example of a soliloquy. We also think of monologue in the context of late-night talk shows or comedy clubs where the host or performer does a stand-up comedy routine.
Comment by A Former Member on August 22, 2009 at 6:00pm
They wrote that, not me, but yes, you could be right. I would have fit.
Comment by Jaume on August 22, 2009 at 4:49pm
You could have added thesaurus to your list.
Comment by A Former Member on August 22, 2009 at 3:42pm
Question of the day, from Dictionary.com:

Q: What is the difference between a dictionary, a lexicon, and a glossary?

A: These reference books have slightly different denotations. A glossary is a specialized vocabulary with definitions but does not provide other information about the words. A glossary may also be called a vocabulary. A lexicon is generally an alphabetically-arranged list of words with their definitions, but the term does not imply that other information about the words is included. However, a lexicon can be used to mean glossary or dictionary, in which case it would contain what each of those words' definitions entail. Lexicon is considered by some to be a more formal word for dictionary. A dictionary is a reference book consisting of an alphabetically-arranged list of words with their definitions, as well as any or all of these: forms (spellings), pronunciations, functions (parts of speech), etymologies, and syntactical and idiomatic uses. So, dictionary is usually reserved for the more comprehensive type of word book. Lexicon's etymology is Greek, while dictionary's is Latin.
Comment by A Former Member on August 20, 2009 at 6:38pm
Question of the day, from Dictionary.com:

Q: What is the difference between a bug and an insect?

A: We tend to use the word bug loosely for any very small creature with legs. However, a true bug is defined as belonging to the order Hemiptera. These creatures characteristically have tough forewings and lack teeth, such as beetles. True bugs have a stylet (a mouth shaped like a straw) that they use to suck juices from plants. Insects belong to the class Insecta and they are characterized by three-part bodies, usually two pairs of wings, and three pairs of legs, (e.g., bees and mosquitoes). Arthropods (spiders, ticks, centipedes, etc.) is a separate phylum from bugs and insects. All of this does not mean that you are wrong to call various insects bugs; because of the common usage of this meaning, it is certainly acceptable.
Comment by A Former Member on August 17, 2009 at 12:47pm
Question of the day, from Dictionary.com:

Q: What is the difference between an outbreak, epidemic, and a pandemic?

A: An epidemic is a disease that affects many people at the same time, such as the flu. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's official definition of epidemic is: 'The occurrence of more cases of disease than expected in a given area or among a specific group of people over a particular period of time'. A pandemic is a very extensive epidemic, like a plague, that is prevalent in a country, continent, or the world. There is also the word endemic, which is a disease native to a people or region, which is regularly or constantly found among a people or specific region. The term outbreak describes the sudden rise in the incidence of a disease, especially a harmful one. An outbreak is characterized by a disease's bypassing of measures to control it. Often, the difference between these terms is determined by the percentage of deaths caused by the disease.
Comment by It's just Matt on August 14, 2009 at 6:35pm
If anyone is interested and does not care about piracy, I have a very good speed reading program (EyeQ) that I can transfer via instant messenger. I have AIM,YIM, and Windows messenger, let me know if you are interested.

Note: The reviews on Amazon are not favorable mainly because the American company that has rights to this Japanese program has horrible customer service. IE damaged discs, discs never came, people charged for discs they never received...so if you are interested but your moral compass is sitting on the fence, they have screwed more people over than a few users not paying the overpriced amount of 200 US for their program.
Comment by A Former Member on August 14, 2009 at 5:14pm
You go D!
 

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