Video of Jane Goodall setting free a chimp that she helped to save. Shows the chimp and Jane hugging each other before the chimp goes back to the wild.

 

http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/21458365/a-tender-hug-goodbye-betw...

Tags: Chimps, Goodall, Jane Goodall, Jubinsky

Views: 142

Replies to This Discussion

How does Jane Goodall avoid having her face ripped off by chimps?  They are notoriously dangerous and very strong. 

Her approach is to love them.

If loving chimp were protection from violence, there wouldn't be horrifying attacks by chimps. 

Travis, a pet male chimp, mauled a friend of his owner in 2009

 blinding her while severing her nose, ears, both hands and severely lacerating her face.

He was 14 years old.

Having a chimp in your home is like having a tiger in your home
According to the Wikipedia article,

Male chimpanzees, once past puberty, exhibit increasingly violent behavior as they age, and are much more aggressive than gorillas.

Chimps are unpredictably aggressive, too.  Travis had been in some TV commercials, and was generally well-behaved. 

Monkeys and apes in general are not good pets when they're past their childhood. 

So how does Jane Goodall manage?  Did she get very good at chimp body language?

This story is way out of context. Travis was extremely accepting of his owner who loved him very much and there were no problems for years. The person he mauled was trying to take physical charge of him when he had gotten out of his owner's house and he, evidently, didn't know her intentions. He might have responded the way he did because he thought the woman was trying to take him away from his owner. Wild dogs are ruthless also but that doesn't mean they can't appreciate being loved. Whatever the natural disposition of chimps is Jane Goodall got that chimp to react in an appreciative way by approaching it with love.

Whatever the natural disposition of chimps is Jane Goodall got that chimp to react in an appreciative way by approaching it with love.

Probably true. However Jane Goodall has also nearly had her neck broken by a chimp, who she also loved and was being cautious around. 
It is quite possible for a pet chimp to turn on its owner, too.  That's one of the main reasons that monkeys and apes make terrible pets once they become adults. 

And actually the woman who was attacked by Travis had known him since infancy and brought a toy for him on the occasion she was attacked. 

I don't know about the toy but before he escaped Travis had been given a medication that could very well have affected him emotionally. I don't know why the woman couldn't have minded her own business. We don't have to look very far before we see that throughout history mankind has committed terrible atrocities. Does this mean that we should look at mankind in a negative light? From the way you are talking it is very hard for me to believe that you are an animal lover.

Chimps aren't people.  That's easy to forget, especially if someone has a chimp as a pet.

People tend to anthropomorphize their pets anyways, even their cats and dogs. 

But chimps are in so many ways so very humanlike - they are closely related to us after all - that we use our ways of relating to humans, with them.

This is very dangerous.  Not only can chimps be unpredictably violent - male chimps become more prone to violence as they age - but they are ALSO incredibly strong!  A chimp is 3-5 times stronger than a human!  And they have less control than we do, over how much strength they use and how they use it. 

A chimp is MUCH stronger than it looks!  If the video you showed, were changed to give an accurate impression of the strength of the chimp, Jane Goodall would be surrounded by 3-5 chimps hugging her, and people watching it would be nervous on her behalf.

The question I asked - how does she avoid getting her face ripped off - is answered:  She doesn't necessarily!  As I posted earlier, Jane Goodall was in fact attacked by a chimp and her neck was nearly broken.  Many primate researchers have missing fingers because chimps have bitten them off!  And these people are VERY careful around the chimps.  They do understand that chimps are dangerous animals. Jane Goodall is probably just lucky she still has all her fingers and she isn't paralyzed or dead from a broken neck. 

Chimps attack the face and hands.  Chimps bit off this guy's nose and fingers and lips. 

Travis had been given a medication that could very well have affected him emotionally. I don't know why the woman couldn't have minded her own business.

Dog owners often blame the victim when their dog attacks someone. 

But dogs need to be trained to react appropriately even when a human is not being appropriate.  It's not OK for the dog to bite someone, even if it's surprised or whatever.  If the dog does bite someone, it's bad training.  (And I'm not saying that the woman who had her face torn off by Travis, was acting inappropriate). 

However, chimps are much more dangerous than dogs.  Stronger, less obedient and more prone to unpredictable violence.  Dogs, properly trained, are good pets.  Chimps are not. 

Chimps are also much more dangerous than people.  Roughly 1-10 people in 100,000 are murdered.  But chimp attacks occur rather often, even though people rarely keep chimps as pets. 

I do love animals.  But it's not a matter of "love conquers all", with chimps.  Understanding is also necessary.  Understanding that chimps are NOT people, they are VERY strong, they have little control over their strength, and they can be unpredictably violent, more so as they age. 

And, Jane Goodall's work with chimps habituated them to people.  The chimps learned how much weaker people are, than they are.  So her work, which has been so much celebrated, also may have had the unintended consequence of making the habituated chimps confident they could snatch people's babies and eat them.  Children and babies aren't supposed to go into the chimp sanctuary at Jane Goodall's institute, because the chimps might attack them. 

ps Chimps share 99% of their genes with humans, and like humans they are prone to violence. 

A tribe of chimps often engaged in warfare against a neighboring tribe. 

 

From a study:

chimpanzees and humans have similar rates of death from intraspecific aggression, whereas chimpanzees have higher rates of non-lethal physical attack. ... We assembled data on lethal aggression from long-term studies of nine communities of chimpanzees living in five populations. We calculated rates of death from intraspecific aggression both within and between communities. ... Estimates for average rates of lethal violence for chimpanzees proved to be similar to average rates for subsistence societies of hunter–gatherers and farmers. Second, we compared rates of non-lethal physical aggression for two populations of chimpanzees and one population of recently settled hunter–gatherers. Chimpanzees had rates of aggression between two and three orders of magnitude higher than humans.

Apparently Jane Goodall did work with a chimp she called Frodo who was violent, and she had to leave when he became the alpha male of the tribe.  Frodo later killed a child.  Perhaps because he'd lost his fear of humans from being around Jane Goodall. 

Apparently Frodo almost broke Jane Goodall's neck at one time.

She's just been cautious, and lucky enough to escape serious harm.

 

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