Your best attempts to reduce endocrine disruptors in your food won't be enough.

Contaminated Diet Contributes to Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting C...

While water bottles may tout BPA-free labels and personal care products declare phthalates not among their ingredients, these assurances may not be enough.

According to a study published February 27 in the Nature Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, we may be exposed to these chemicals in our diet, even if our diet is organic and we prepare, cook, and store foods in non-plastic containers. Children may be most vulnerable.

"Current information we give families may not be enough to reduce exposures,"...

The researchers compared the chemical exposures of 10 families, half of whom were given written instructions on how to reduce phthalate and BPA exposures. They received handouts prepared by the national Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units, a network of experts on environmentally related health effects in children. The other families received a five-day catered diet of local, fresh, organic food that was not prepared, cooked or stored in plastic containers.

When the researchers tested the participants' urinary concentrations of metabolites for phthalates and BPA,...

... in those adults and children eating the catered diet. ... The urinary concentration for ... phthalates were 100-fold higher than the those levels found in the majority of the general population.

The concentrations were also much higher for children as compared to the adults. The researchers then tested the phthalate concentrations in the food ingredients used in the dietary intervention. Dairy products -- butter, cream, milk, and cheese -- had concentrations above 440 nanograms/gram. Ground cinnamon and cayenne pepper had concentrations above 700 ng/g, and ground coriander had concentrations of 21,400 ng/g.

Using the study results, the researchers estimated that the average child aged three to six years old was exposed to 183 milligrams per kilogram of their body weight per day. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended limit is 20 mg/kg/day.

... it may take new federal regulations to reduce exposures to these chemicals." [emphasis mine]


Tags: BPA, food contamination, organic food, phthalates

Views: 26

Support Atheist Nexus

Donate Today

Donate

 

Help Nexus When You Buy From Amazon

Amazon

 

Latest Activity

© 2014   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service