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Hang With Friends

Location: Earth
Members: 848
Latest Activity: 2 hours ago

Come on in, pull up a chair!

Picture yourself spending some time with congenial friends, sharing your lives and pictures from your cell phones." They're curious about that cool game, song, movie, camping trip, art show, or other event that fascinated you. You talk about all kinds of stuff, poetry, styles, personal achievements, relationships, and bad days. You can share your inner child, and laugh together. They sympathetically listen to your feelings about serious topics like politics or climate change, even when they don't agree.

Personal validation comes from paying attention to one another, giving more than you get. Everyone respects you and themselves, despite our amazing range of personal tastes and interests. They'll tell you they don't agree with an idea or behavior without implying you're a bad person or somehow deficient. It's an "I'm OK, You're OK" kind of fellowship, where nobody tries to make himself look better by picking on somebody else.

Nobody here is into mind games. A discussion started with a loaded guilt-throwing question will be deleted.

This group is not intended to compete with other groups on topics they cover but to "fill in the cracks." Whenever a discussion dwells at length on a topic for which there's an existing group, we urge you to provide members a link to that group to continue along their tangent.

A comment is a shout-out, which will get lost in a few days, because the comment wall is just a random stack.

Please start a discussion to share stories, photos, and videos. Replies will pop up in your "latest activity" and a conversation can develop from the feelings and thoughts you contributed. Groups are built on discussions.

Discussion Forum

Seth Andrews - The Copycats: How Christianity Steals The Best Ideas

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by Soren Sagan on Wednesday. 9 Replies

Many of us have observed or learned how christianity shamelessly borrows from other sources to bolster its position and show off its supposed wonderfulness.  Well, Seth Andrews of The Thinking Atheist podcast has compiled some of the more modern-day…Continue

Tags: steal, borrow, copycat, The Thinking Atheist, Seth Andrews

Finding Your Roots

Started by Randall Smith. Last reply by Chris G Dec 15. 9 Replies

I've been into genealogy for a long time. It's fun, especially with internet help, but increasingly frustrating. You see, I've hit "brick walls". And being a Smith doesn't make research any easier.Wouldn't you think I could find the death date and…Continue

Christmas: Behind the Curtain (The Thinking Atheist)

Started by Loren Miller. Last reply by sk8eycat Dec 12. 11 Replies

Well, it's that time of year again.  Time to gird our loins, put on our battle armor and join the (dah-dah DAAAAAH!) WAR AGAINST CHRISTMAS!!! [groan!] Yeah, most of us have heard that crap before, probably too many times, in fact, how atheists are…Continue

Tags: Christmas, The Thinking Atheist, Seth Andrews

Secular and Reclaimed Winter Holiday Songs

Started by Grinning Cat. Last reply by sk8eycat Nov 26. 41 Replies

This is an appropriate day of the year for this subject...What are some of your favorite winter holiday songs?It would be especially good to share powerful new secular lyrics to tunes that have become associated with Christmas.…Continue

Tags: singing, lyrics, reclaimed, reclaiming, HumanLight

Aljam

Started by Randall Smith. Last reply by Grinning Cat Nov 24. 4 Replies

I'm not a news hound by any stretch, but I do like to stay informed about what's going on in the world. (I despise "local" news with all the reports of murders, robberies, fires, etc.)The national "evening" news shows really irritate me. I hate…Continue

Surreal, I haz it

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Nov 22. 79 Replies

Surreal, not just found in art.Continue

Tags: surreal

Comment Wall

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Comment by Loren Miller on May 26, 2013 at 10:17pm

I'll be honest ... that stupid cat is beginning to get on my nerves.

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on May 26, 2013 at 8:42pm

Sorry to hear you're feeling punky, Joan. Ant-creepy bones, *cringe*.

The Moses brideg is interesting, but wouldn't it be easily flooded?

Comment by Steph S. on May 26, 2013 at 7:27pm

Comment by Loren Miller on May 26, 2013 at 2:44pm

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 26, 2013 at 11:17am

Although my nausea and diarrhea Rx work, I feel punky. I'll be in bed or in the garden, just observing my body as it processes the chemicals. The bone marrow shot made an odd feeling in my arms and legs, my shoulder blades, and it felt a little like ants running up and down inside my bones. Talked to the staff, it is a normal feeling. OK, so a new normal is being established. 

Cary cooked a delicious meal last night, and I enjoyed it. Food has lost its appeal, however.

Comment by booklover on May 26, 2013 at 9:33am

Cool bridge Joan!  I've never seen anything like that.  Thanks for posting it. :)

Going to a Memorial Day party at my husband's friend's fiancee's house.  Our son is coming with us.  Our daughter is going to a friends, and their group of friends is watching an "Arrested Development" marathon.  I've never seen the show, but my daughter said it's really funny. 

It is cold and gloomy here! :( Have a good weekend everyone!~ Mindy

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 26, 2013 at 1:29am

How clever! 

The Moses Bridge, Netherlands.
visit our blog--> http://we-earth.blogspot.in/
it's INature

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 25, 2013 at 3:45pm

Ruth, no need to say "Sorry". You always bring out aspects that my enthusiasm misses and I appreciate your comment. 
I believe a transformation is taking place in which we realize that agriculture closer to home, and using non-GMO seeds will become recognized as necessary. Also, we have got to find ways to stop fossil fuel use, and one way is to not ship garlic from China when we grow superior garlic right here. Going back to an easier lifestyle is not a reality. Pumping water from a well, growing all our own foods, perceiving nature as having the answers to all things, is not a viable option. 

You quite correctly note vague and non-scientific solutions in her piece; it is strange to think outside of the traditions to which we have become accustomed. 

Let me see if I can flesh out some ideas. Food grown closer to consumption, living lower on the food chain, using natural cloth instead of from petroleum products, develop bamboo  to replace plastics and woods for building materials, smaller communities with neighborhood stores, bicycle lanes, work closer to home or in the home, work life more friendly to raising children and supporting family life, institute tax strategy that pulls taxes from investments and less draw on wages, universal health care, investments in education with more focus on sciences, re-introduce the feminine principle in politics and economics, use some strategy for values judgment, such as planning for the 7th generation ahead, including what is healthy for the planet, plan long term, challenge warring. Well that is a start. 

Now, how do we implement such ideas. Farmers who know the consequences of unsound agricultural practices can work together for agriculture reform. Agribusiness will not end, but agriculture needs to change. 

Climate change science can offer research and strategies to get off fossil fuels. The Petroleum industry will fight it, but they are small compared to the people who realize the need for change. 

Informed buyers can influence products and goods by their buying habits. WalMart has loyal customers, but because many of them do not understand the long term consequences of using such strategies and they benefit by the low prices.

Costco offers a viable option with non-slave conditions for manufactured goods they offer, and give health and retirement benefits to employees. That requires education of the public. 

Universal health care can be consumer generated; that requires education of the public. 

Honoring the roll of women and female principles is a cultural thing and well worthy of effort. So many men and women now understand how out-of-balance principles diminish quality of life. With better balance in family life, with needs of children considered, everyone benefits. 

I did not take into account the heating of farmlands around the world, however, eating lower on the food chain will pick up part of that; not all, by any means. We will be forced to change, that is the only sure thing I know. 

Yes, I jumped at Grace Lee Boggs' enthusiasm and more realistic thought needs to be done. I appreciate your words. 

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on May 25, 2013 at 12:49pm

I'm somewhat cynical of the American Revolution described by Grace Lee Boggs. Even if there are more than a million small, barely visible, self-healing civic groups across the world which combine spiritual growth with practical action in their lives, its sounds vague, fragmented and anti-scientific to me.

"Many of these groups are inspired by a philosophy that replaces the scientific and reductive rationalism of seventeenth-century Western male philosophers (such as Descartes and Bacon) with the ways of knowing of Indigenous Peoples (which includes the perceptions of trees and animals) and of women, based on intimate connections with Nature and ideas of healing and caring that were part of European village culture prior to the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century ..." "... , most of us carry on this cultural revolution in our own way. For example, a doctor may decide to practice alternative medicine." source

The idea that retreat to indigenous people's knowledge and sixteenth century village culture can somehow topple the power of huge multinational corporations comes across to me as reactive rather than a bold new vision to manage the planet sustainably. How does this constructively address global overpopulation? How does it rethink large scale reorganization of economics, production, and consumption for a viable alternative to megacorporation-run globalization? Climate Destabilization is a global problem which will not be solved by local thinking and action alone, even if the locals are in touch via the internet. What I read in her first chapter sounds like idealization of earlier forms such as local agriculture. What worked well in the sixteenth century will not work at all in a hellish 6°C hotter planet.

While the values of closeness to nature will be an essential part of any sustainable culture, for me there's too much missing in this vision for me to buy into it.

Sorry, Joan.

Comment by booklover on May 25, 2013 at 10:52am

Patricia, can't wait to see pics of your remodel! :)

 

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