Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 170
Latest Activity: 9 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

Discussion Forum

An Old Lady's Hugelkultur Bed

Started by Barbara Livingston. Last reply by Randall Smith Dec 10. 3 Replies

Permaculture Concept. Bill Mollison

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Dec 6. 2 Replies

My south garden 1993 & 2013

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Dec 1. 1 Reply

Permaculture, Ben Falk

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 30. 0 Replies

Permaculture, Bill Mollison

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 16. 0 Replies

Plant Labels

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Joan Denoo Nov 8. 21 Replies

Design with Nature

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 6. 0 Replies

Sepp Holzer´s Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Nov 6. 1 Reply

Permaculture, John D. Liu

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Nov 3. 8 Replies

Comment Wall

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Comment by Joan Denoo 9 hours ago

Comment by Randall Smith 9 hours ago

Yes, I've always been a Jefferson admirer. And who isn't without a fault or two?!

Comment by Joan Denoo 22 hours ago

According to "Edible Landscaping",  "The American persimmon (D. virginiana) is a faster growing, larger tree that's hardy to USDA zone 5." So, there is a possibility I could succeed with one here. I have a spot that needs filling. I will chat with my Extention Agent when I get a chance. 

Daniel, I like the Jefferson quote. I went to The Republic, Volume 3 By John Robert Irelan site and read a little more of Jefferson's quote.  

I am intrigued by the man, Jefferson, his devotion to the creation of a new republic based on human freedom, even as he owned slaves. I read of his attempts to get a wine growing enterprise going in a new country, even as he neglected the many grape cuttings sent to him from Europe and the Americas. 

Comment by Daniel W yesterday

"I have often thought that if heaven had given me choice of my position and calling, it should have been on a rich spot of earth, well watered, and near a good market for the productions of the garden. No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden. Such a variety of subjects, some one always coming to perfection, the failure of one thing repaired by the success of another, and instead of one harvest a continued one through the year." --- Thomas Jefferson (August 20, 1811, to Charles W. Peale)

Comment by Daniel W yesterday
Randy, my Asian and hybrid persimmon trees are settled in nicely. It might be the rootstock that determines success with transplanting. I read American persimmons - Diospyros virginiana - have few fibrous roots, and they don't regenerate well, so they are difficult to transplant. Similar for Asian, Diospyros kaki. Mine are on a different species - Diospyros lotus - which is more fibrous snd transplants easier, but not as hardy.

Starks has several that are reported on many websites as not needing a male - parthenocarpic. One, Yates, is from Indiana. Others are from collectors and research programs. Meader is self- fruitful but occassionally has male flowers. Some kaki do that too.

I like what you did best of all. Growing from seed. that really is great! But at 60, and having cancer, I dont want to wait 10 years. Might never see them bear. I have to be realistic. Better chance with the 3 to 5 years to bear for the named types. Of course it's always a gamble.

The Starks persimmons are tiny - 1 to 2 foot tall. They are in air pots - bottomless pots that supposedly have bushier roots due to "air pruning" of the root tips. They claim they transplant easier. I imagine they are on D. virginiana roots, being from Missouri. One to 2 foot tall... That really is tiny. But my figs start out as cuttings, smaller, so I suppose it's possible.
Comment by Randall Smith yesterday

Daniel, not only are the persimmons delicious to eat, the tree itself is magnificent--and you don't have to prune it (self pruning from heavy persimmon loaded branches). I have to say, however, only about one in two persimmons have been edible this year. I've had to spit out (with a "yuck") many of them. I hate when that happens. The tree is still loaded this late in the season.

Good luck in finding an American persimmon. Furthermore, lots of luck in getting them to grow. I tried twice (catalogue trees) and failed. That's when I started them from my own seeds.

As far as pawpaws ("Indiana banana)", I can live without them.

Comment by Amy yesterday
Daniel, also look at www.fast-growing-trees.com. they have alot of awesome varieties
Comment by Daniel W yesterday

OK Randy, you have me thinking about growing American persimmons!  I see Starks has 2 varieties that bear without a pollinating male.  Burnt Ridge has some too.

I need to get outside and quit looking at online catalogs!

Comment by Daniel W on Sunday
Randy I agree. bMy philosophy is, it's not about having, it's about creating. It's not about knowing, it's about learning. It's not about being, it's about growing. Or something like that.

On the other hand, I would love to have a persimmon of my own growing right now. I found some ripe Hichaya persimmons at the store this week. They were heaven. My Saijo persimmon tree is about 7 foot tall. Maybe 2015 will be the year?

The Nikita's Gift American /Asian hybrid persimmon is smaller, so that will probably be a longer wait.

I also keep checking the pawpaw buds. One of those might be big enough in 2015 but Im not holding my breath waiting.
Comment by Randall Smith on Sunday

I think half the fun of gardening is experimenting. One certainly learns by doing, which includes making mistakes.

Barbara, with my leaves, I simply put them in a big pile next to my compost bin(s). Then, in the spring and summer, I alternate them with grass clippings and soil or my horse manure. I think only twice did the pile ever get hot. I accept cold composting over a longer period of time.

Amy, welcome to the group. A couple of words about squash: I save and plant many seeds, Delicata being my fave. And I enjoy the variety of hybrids that result. Some offspring are really bizarre!

 

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