Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 168
Latest Activity: on Tuesday

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

Discussion Forum

Permaculture, Bill Mollison

Started by Joan Denoo on Sunday. 0 Replies

Plant Labels

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Joan Denoo Nov 8. 21 Replies

Design with Nature

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 6. 0 Replies

Sepp Holzer´s Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Nov 6. 1 Reply

Permaculture, John D. Liu

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Nov 3. 8 Replies

Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Daniel W Nov 3. 2 Replies

Permaculture Transformation In 90 Days

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Nov 2. 4 Replies

A texas garden I never thought I would see!

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Oct 30. 4 Replies

Backyard Organic Garden

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Oct 29. 10 Replies

What the heck is hugelkultur? How does it save water?

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Oct 29. 8 Replies

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

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Comment by Joan Denoo on June 28, 2014 at 8:23am

The garden is a great teacher. Randall, Your hunch that it is a pollinator problem sounds very possible. One year I planted a row of seeds and labelled them. When they grew, they were not what I had named them. Seems odd to me because when I majored in horticulture at WSU, one of our freshman classes was seed identification. Dr. Kalin gave us a cup of seeds, an assortment of all kinds. Our task was to identify each seed, plant it and see if we got what we identified. Our grade depended on how well we did correctly distinguishing seeds.  I did very well. 

I look forward to learning of your harvest, especially the ones that hybridized. 

Spud, I just bought new soaker hoses for my raised beds. The old ones are 18 years old with lots of repairs. In fact, when we pull them all out this fall, we'll be able to see just how many patches there are. I also bought those little pressure regulators. I bury all my hoses to keep them from getting the leaves and stems damp, and to get every drop of water into the soil. 

How to build a spot-watering system for berries, bushes, and trees 

Comment by Randall Smith on June 28, 2014 at 7:27am

Joan, I'd forgotten how well melons grow in my compost pile! I think you're on to something. However, this year, the plants seem to be thriving. I suspect it's a pollination problem--few honeybees. Fingers crossed.

I have vines spreading out everywhere. These include melons, squash, and pumpkins. Most are in rows or hills, but some are "volunteers". It'll be like a scavenger hunt this autumn. What's fun is to plant hybrid squash seeds to see what varieties show up. Ah the joys of godless gardening (thanks, Daniel).

Comment by Idaho Spud on June 28, 2014 at 6:25am

"Seven thirty O'clocks". Cute Daniel.  

Sorry about your melons Randall.

Joan, I don't have room either, but I'm trying a muskmelon and 6 kinds of watermelon this year, hoping they don't get in each others way too much.  

Over the last 10 days, I transplanted them all, put black fabric around them for warmth, and put soaker hoses on top of the fabric, but under the melons.  Today, I finish up with I soaker hoses under the last two.  Then I'll hook all the hoses to the water supply with a pressure reducer, so the soaker hoses get only 25 PSI instead of 110, which I've determined blows them out after a few years (I remember Ruth complaining about that).  The lower pressure also just lets them weep instead of making little sprays that wet the leaves (a no-no, especially for watermelon).  

Pictures to follow.  Right now, I'm going out to the garden before the sun fries my brain more than it already is.

Comment by Plinius on June 28, 2014 at 1:53am

They're lovely flowers, Daniel!

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 28, 2014 at 1:40am

Randall, I don't grow vine crops because I don't have room, but I remember as a child coming from farming families, that my grandmothers and aunts grew them near the barns where the manure was shovel out in a mighty heap. They had all kinds of squash, summer and winter, and melons of all kinds.

You might try bringing in a bag of composted steer manure and plant your seeds in hills of manure. No guarantee that my memory has any wisdom attached to it, but what the heck, nothing ventured, nothing gained. 

Comment by Daniel W on June 28, 2014 at 12:13am

Some of the blossoms on my Four O'Clocks.  This is the first time I've grown them.  An old fashioned flower that I've never seen in the stores, probably because they don't bloom during the main part of the sales day.  In my yard they don't bloom until evening, so should be called "Seven thirty O'clocks".

Comment by Randall Smith on June 26, 2014 at 7:32am

I haven't had much luck with melons (cant. & water) in recent years. For one, seeds haven't germinated very well, and second, I get few melons, and third, the melons I do get are tiny. But, I keep trying. This year's plants look healthy and blooming like crazy. Come on bees, do your thing!

Comment by Daniel W on June 24, 2014 at 9:07am

Garden as Habitat. looks interesting.  I think that could be as little as a few plants on a deck or roof, or an acre.  I like watching bees and hummingbirds discover my deck plants.  I could do without the deer or rabbits on my larger garden, but the honeybees and bumblebees are very happy there too.

"THINK 3-D, SAYS DOUG TALLAMY, co-author of “The Living Landscape,” and in fact, maybe think 4-D, since by designing your landscape in all three dimensions, layering plants into complex communities, you’ll add the “D” of diversity, too.

Entomologist Doug Tallamy and his wife have spent 14 years coaxing back to life 10 acres of what had been farmland for nearly four centuries: achieving more diversity by adding layers to its once-flat botanical architecture. Today 54 species of birds nest on their Delaware property, and acorns the couple planted have become 20-foot trees–so many that now editing is required."

Comment by Daniel W on June 24, 2014 at 9:01am

Spud, I think they would be fine to plant without loosening up.  I haven't had that much experience with watermelons.  You are right, most plants prefer a gentle transfer.  I have some that authors claim can't be transplanted, but do fine with careful treatment.  Others don't mind.

Comment by Idaho Spud on June 23, 2014 at 3:13pm

Daniel, these watermelon roots don't need to be loosened-up before planting do they?  Anyone else feel free to express your opinion also.

I had one that had twice as many roots running around the edge of the pot that I loosened-up (roughed-up) and another that had twice as many that I didn't.  I'll see if I set-back the growth of the one I roughed-up or not.  

I think most plants (and especially watermelon) don't like their roots messed with when transplanting, unless they are very root-bound.

 

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