Godless in the garden

Information

Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 168
Latest Activity: 16 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
What's your gardening style?
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Wild Parsnip - It can burn skin.
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

Discussion Forum

Backyard Organic Garden

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Sentient Biped Sep 7. 4 Replies

Permaculture Transformation In 90 Days

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 27. 2 Replies

Sugar Baby

Started by Don. Last reply by Don Aug 24. 11 Replies

Evans Bali cherry

Started by Don. Last reply by Don Aug 24. 4 Replies

Asparagus

Started by Čenek Sekavec. Last reply by Idaho Spud Aug 23. 4 Replies

Some pictures from my garden

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 26. 7 Replies

The Next Green Revolution May Rely on Microbes

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Sentient Biped Jun 30. 2 Replies

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Godless in the garden to add comments!

Comment by Sentient Biped on June 15, 2014 at 12:05pm

Barbara, the other photos are a few pages back on comments now.  That's something I love about this group - there is so much active conversation.  I feel among friends and neighbors.

Anyone know this weed?  It comes up among the flower borders and in vegetable beds.  It is not invasive - only a few here and there, and growth is compact.  They have a pretty flower, either blue or pink.

Comment by Sentient Biped on June 15, 2014 at 8:42am
Randall, thats what makes it great! Gardening is in full season!

I think the midwest and Northeast must be prime hollyhock growing country. Each year I try something new, either plant or technique. Sometimes several things. Now that the four o'clocks look like tey are sbout to start blooming, and the scallop and other squashes are growing, time for something new. I have never seen hollyhocks here. I read, rabbits snd slugs like them. I will plan for those. It will be interesting to start them now, for next year.

I got everbearing strawberries a few years ago. Not as productive by far, but they continue through the sumner here. We are getting a lot now.

Joan I would love to try those Turkish hollyhocks! That would be really special for me. If you think of it when they seed, i will plant them in both pkaces. Thank you!

Blooming now - Ning's wildflower meadow, especially poppies of all kinds. Daylilies. Lilies. Roses. Meyer lemon - in container, overwinter indoors. very fragrant.
Comment by Randall Smith on June 15, 2014 at 7:50am

Too many topics all at once!! 

On hollyhocks, they come up "wild" in my garden. Can't remember ever planting them on purpose. Same with sunflowers. I "wee" hundreds of them every spring, but leave one or two just to keep them coming--I suppose for the finches.

Barbara, cacti are out of my territory, both in knowledge and climate.

Spud, my strawberry season is coming to an end. I froze several gallons, however (unwashed, with stems). There used to be a wild patch nearby, but it's gone. Talk about sweet berries--but very small and tedious to pick.

Happy Fathers Day to all the fathers out there.

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 15, 2014 at 1:14am

Daniel, my grandmother had hollyhock growing out behind the chicken coop. They came back from seed every year. So when I brought home all those hollyhock seeds from Turkey, I just threw them on the ground. Didn't even cover them or stir the soil. They came up the first year and then I stared sorting the seeds by color. I put a colored ribbon on each stem revealing the color of the blossom. In the autumn, after the blossoms died, I cut the yellow ribbon ones and threw the whole stalk on the eastern part of my garden. The red ribbon ones I cut and threw the stalk with seed heads on the southern garden. Well, now, several years later, I have hollyhocks coming up everywhere; The birds didn't seem to like my color scheme and scattered all the colors all over the garden. I don't have any ripe seeds now, but I will mail you some in the fall. It will be fun having my experience in Turkey get shared in Vancouver or Battle Ground, WA 

Comment by Plinius on June 15, 2014 at 1:05am

I've tried to grow hollyhocks for five years, without succes. Bought small plants - they disappeared, tried seeds - they never grew. And this year, now that I have no time for my garden, there)s a hollyhock, almost as tall as I am! Will send pic when the flowers are open.

Comment by Idaho Spud on June 14, 2014 at 4:58pm

Yes, they have a much better nose and ears than I do!

Comment by BarbaraSATX on June 14, 2014 at 4:54pm

Spud, I'm not sure, but you may well be right. I thought it was also interesting that 12 million mothers leave the cave each night and return at sunrise - and each mother is able to find her own baby among the 12 million babies by smell and sound. I doubt I could find my offspring by sound and smell among 12 million others.  Mind boggling. Having fathers in the cave would just add to the chaos, LOL  www.batcon.org. I haven't read entire site, maybe answer is there.  

Comment by Idaho Spud on June 14, 2014 at 4:42pm

I've been meaning to say that most of my life I've known bats were our friends, and I've always found them fascinating.

I just read an article on bats that said the mothers find places that are warm to raise the hairless infants.  That made me think that the male bats probably live outside because there's not enough room for them inside.

Comment by Joan Denoo on June 14, 2014 at 4:34pm

I didn't know that either, Spud. Bats are more complex than fables would have us believe. 

Barbara. I don't know the answer; however, here is one option that might work without harming your tree. I used this technique on a tree that had runners going everywhere and it worked.

I cut off the trunk low to the ground, but I think cut at any height would work. Drill a lot of holes in the cut part of the trunk, or pound in large nails to make holes. With an old plastic squirt ketchup bottle filled with vinegar, I carefully squirted the holes full of vinegar. Whenever I found a new shoot coming up, I used smaller nails to make  holes and put the vinegar in the shoots. I also have a garden injection needle that helps with the small shoots. I found mine years ago at a mom and pop hardware store. Sorry, I can't find one on the internet. 
Things You Will Need

  • old squirt bottle
  • vinegar
  • Bowl
  • Chlorine bleach
  • bowl of water

To clean the squirt bottle: "Combine a mixture that is 1/2 water and 1/2 chlorine bleach in a bowl. Wash the squirt bottle with water-bleach solution. Repeat the procedure. Rinse with water. The water-bleach mixture sterilizes the squirt bottle and prevents the spread of disease. Clean the bottle this way after each injection."

Comment by Idaho Spud on June 14, 2014 at 3:28pm

Barbara, that funny comment about the feminist bats made me smile.  It was news to me also that male bats don't live in the cave.

 

Members (168)

 
 
 

Support Atheist Nexus

Donate Today

Donate

 

Help Nexus When You Buy From Amazon

Amazon

AJY

 

© 2014   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service