Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 170
Latest Activity: on Sunday

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

Discussion Forum

An Old Lady's Hugelkultur Bed

Started by Barbara Livingston. Last reply by Randall Smith Dec 10. 3 Replies

Permaculture Concept. Bill Mollison

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Dec 6. 2 Replies

My south garden 1993 & 2013

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Dec 1. 1 Reply

Permaculture, Ben Falk

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 30. 0 Replies

Permaculture, Bill Mollison

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 16. 0 Replies

Plant Labels

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Joan Denoo Nov 8. 21 Replies

Design with Nature

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 6. 0 Replies

Sepp Holzer´s Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Nov 6. 1 Reply

Permaculture, John D. Liu

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Nov 3. 8 Replies

Comment Wall

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Comment by Joan Denoo on October 21, 2014 at 12:13pm

Randy, a beautiful harvest of sweet potatoes. Some mighty good eat'n awaits. I like your brick ground covering. Very pretty way to manage getting out of mud and having a solid surface. Did you put it in? 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 21, 2014 at 12:10pm

Patricia, the video of the hummingbirds coming in through the open window to the feeder is a remarkable sight. The bird has the best of both worlds, access to freedom and the outdoors, and feeding in a safe place away from predators. What a nice idea. I wonder what the poop is like for a hummingbird? 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 21, 2014 at 12:08pm

Daniel, organic gardening makes good sense, with the understanding that it takes knowledge of the effects of an organic garden and what it produces. Management by using nature's chemicals, such as barnyard manure, adds more than just nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. The chemical components may not support the bacterial growth and microbial metabolism life the way that compost and barnyard fertilizer does. There are times when I cannot find a source other than petrochemicals. Using them sparingly enhances the garden. With proper management, it harms very few other things. 

My soil is alive! Spreading compost around also spreads the earth worms and all the microbes that develop over a year's time. 

Years ago, I used gasoline to edge the grass from the borders and it killed the grass very nicely the first season. The second season I had the finest growth of grass bordering and invading my border than ever before. That tells us something about petroleum products and its use in the garden, doesn't it! 

Comment by Idaho Spud on October 21, 2014 at 11:16am

I finally had a watermelon stolen a couple of days ago.  It was one that grew outside the fence.  It was just sitting there on the sidewalk, tempting everyone that walked by.  Haha, I think they're going to be disappointed in the taste.  Too much cold weather to ripen properly.  So far, In the two years I've grown them, no one has leaned over the fence to take one inside.  It would be easy to do.

I've been eating raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries for about 2 months.  They are finally tapering off.

Comment by Idaho Spud on October 21, 2014 at 11:11am

Randy, do you save some sweet potatoes for planting next year?

Comment by Čenek Sekavec on October 20, 2014 at 9:01am

Nice looking spuds! I always wonder what happens to all the little ones that are grown commercially since the only the largest appear in stores. 

Comment by Randall Smith on October 20, 2014 at 7:36am

Here's about half the sweet potatoes I dug up. I forgot to take a picture of the loaded persimmon tree.

Comment by Daniel W on October 19, 2014 at 3:36pm

I love hummingbirds too.  They are the main reason I grow crocosmia, they fight over that flower. 

Comment by Bertold Brautigan on October 19, 2014 at 3:16pm

I love hummers - I had scads of them all summer this year. They're almost hypnotic; I could sit and watch them for hours.

Comment by Daniel W on October 19, 2014 at 2:42pm

Those frittilaries are part of your garden evolution!  The ones that did not come back are like the dinosaurs, but left no fossils.   I've had so many plants that failed to thrive.  Meanwhile, others prosper and proliferate.  Some, too well.  I think I've tried to grow Crown Imperials in the past and they didn't make it.  Added them to a raised bed last year, thinking they would have better drainage and might be a deer repellent.  They were nice, but fleeting.   I hope to see them in the Spring, they are quite dramatic.

 

I thought of you and your experiences when I read Chalker-Scott's book.  I haven't listened to them, but she also has a podcast.  If I can download them, I can listen while driving.  I am kind of defensive about organic gardening - as an overall system, I think it's better for everyone than chemical-based gardening - but I understand her take on it and I am not a fundamentalist organic gardener. 

 

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