Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 166
Latest Activity: 2 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
What's your gardening style?
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Wild Parsnip - It can burn skin.
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

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Comment by Sentient Biped on January 8, 2013 at 7:56pm

Now I'm going to think of a hot pepper/glue variation for my fruit trees.  Maybe hot pepper / paint.   Or hot pepper / wax.  I was mulling over how to make that from habaneros, since they are so much hotter.   As others have commented, the deer might just find it a spicy flavor.

Comment by Idaho Spud on January 8, 2013 at 1:56pm

Dominic, the cayenne pepper solution is interesting.  I'll remember it if I ever get some land in the country.

I used it as a solution to my squirrel problem.  There was one or more that found an opening in my porch attic and made a lot of bothersome noise, so I covered the hole with a board.  The squirrel promptly chewed through the board, so the next one I covered with pepper mixed with glue.  The squirrel chewed at the edges of it, but finally gave-up before it got through.

Comment by Dominic Florio on January 8, 2013 at 1:19pm

Foxes, coyotees, skunks, possums, raccoons, hawks, snakes, weasels, otters, bobcats, and neighbor's dogs and cats.  The only ones I really resent are the dogs and cats because that is a human issues.  The rest are welcome.  It is up to me to provide good fencing to protect my animals.  It's been a learning esperience on how to out smart them.  I just recently discovered how to combat rats.  My feed is in metal garbage cans, but they would eat whatever was in the hoppers and avoid poison.  I tried grating the poison sticks or mixing pellets with peanut butter.  I tried mixing all types of food items with poison, but only to very limited success.  Finally, I mixed the feed (as I do with my small pet birds) with cayene pepper.  The fowl like it, but the rats had no choice but to eat the poison.  It is working! 

Comment by Joan Denoo on January 8, 2013 at 12:53pm

Dominic, what a splendid menagerie you have and such varieties. There must be a lot of interesting sounds emanating from your place. I see you have sturdy fencing; what predators give ou grief?  

Comment by Sentient Biped on January 8, 2013 at 11:01am

Amazing garden!  Beautiful birds!  

I love including the animals in my thoughts and ideas about gardening.  Even the moles, which are annoying, have their place.   Plus, growing organically, the manure helps a lot with fertility.

Comment by Dominic Florio on January 8, 2013 at 10:15am

I wanted to add that I am an animal rescuer.  Yes I have hens, roosters, ducks, peafowl, guinea fowl, doves, pigeons, quail, a cockatoo, 12 cockatiels, 3 conures, 3 turkeys, finches, canaries, budgies, 3 cats, 2 prairie dogs, 12 guinea pigs, 3 sulcata tortoises, frogs, fish, 2 goats, and 6 pugs.

Comment by Dominic Florio on January 8, 2013 at 10:08am

The one Lady Slipper I have blooms once a year.  The Vanda is doing great.  My first one held on for a few years and when I moved it to the sunny side of a tree, it bloomed.  The roots took hold of the bark and I couldn't move it during a freeze, and lost it.  But now I know better.  Some sun and daily watering seems to do the trick.  I have this one about six months and this is the second time it has bloomed.  I like to mix the various species on hanging poles, so that in I always have something in bloom, at some time.

Comment by Sentient Biped on January 8, 2013 at 9:49am

Vandas wont grow here at all, even inside - not enough sunshine.  Oncidiums and Odontoglossums bloom one a year for me.  It's really surprising - That bloomed for me?!  Wow!  There are 3 in bloom now, would have been 4 but I dropped one.  I would love to grow some cypripedia, but I don't know if my climate / soil / conditions can handle them, and I already push the zone limit too far and have multiple containers dormant in the garage waiting for Spring.

Looks like you have chickens too.  Hens are part of my garden too.  

Tomatoes here go into the garden in May.  Peppers a week or 2 later.  I might take them for granted if they were year round.  Anticipation is good!

I am SO anxious to get started this year.  

Comment by Dominic Florio on January 8, 2013 at 9:36am

We are supposed to plant tomatoes in the warmer months, but the winter has been very warm this year and I plant tomatoes anyway, just for the hell of it. I'm finding that some of my orchids which were once a year bloomers, are now blooming several times, as they are getting older and more crowded.  I do have to take them in if there is a freeze, but normally I leave them out under the old oaks, I do not divide, and they live off of fallen leaves and a few bananna skins when I think about it.  I killed them all when I first moved to FLorida, 20 yrs ago, but now I grow them with no problem.

Comment by Plinius on January 8, 2013 at 6:00am

You make me jealous, Dominic! Such beautiful plants! We have a rainy winter with high temperatures (10°C), it's so warm that the birds are starting to sing already. The garlic I planted in October didn't even stop growing, but even so, I have to wait six weeks more before I can start sowing.

 

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