Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 165
Latest Activity: 5 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
What's your gardening style?
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Wild Parsnip - It can burn skin.
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

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Comment by Annie Thomas on December 15, 2012 at 9:59am

I am checking emails after being offline for a couple of days. Although I have not been part of this conversation, it's been  fun Saturday morning reading. Amer, I find your descriptions of where you live fascinating and educational.  I live in the US, in Florida, but enjoy hearing about what life is like for others around the world.  Thank you for sharing!

Comment by Joan Denoo on December 15, 2012 at 9:48am

Bugs

Some insects feed on rosebuds,

And others feed on carrion.

Between them they devour the earth.

Bugs are totalitarian.

 

~ Ogden Nash

Comment by Joan Denoo on December 15, 2012 at 9:03am

Amer, your comments interest me greatly and I suspect others enjoy them as well. Thank you for describing your customs and traditions; the article on mountains of Pakistan offers a perspective of the challenges living and gardening in a country of such sharp contrasts. 

Comment by amer chohan on December 15, 2012 at 7:43am

Johan! my name is pronounced like Aa-mir. My mother tounge is punjabi. I teach chemistry, biology and physics in English. We use British English in our schools so it might look a bit different to Americans.

I perhaps talked too much about my area and that too at a wrong fourm. Many people are getting bored already, but one or two more intresting informations. My small area is called pothohar(means semi-mountains). It is right between thousands of kilometers of plains and world highest mountains.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mountains_in_Pakistan

with amazing altitudes where snow never melts. Sometimes it snows in mid summer. There are cities like Gilgit and Skerdu in these mountains where construction is done only in months of June and July, in rest of year cement refuses to dry up.

I enjoy both seasons. Summer of plains(where people use fans during winters) and winters of mountains(where people use heaters in the summer).

Comment by Plinius on December 15, 2012 at 1:15am

Thanks Joan, you always make such nice compliments! I'm patient with any that tries to do well - people, animals or plants - but when I see that they don't want to do well, I stop caring. Result is that I'm surrounded by happy life forms.

It won't be very cold here, we're just 20 KM from the North Sea - we'll have some weeks of 0 or -2 °C and perhaps a few nights of -5 °C.

For a farm animal is's not idyllic here: there are lots of factory farms here - most of them neatly hidden. What you've seen are probably small farms belonging to people with ideals; a beautiful showcase for the tourists. Now and then I read in the paper that a farm burnt down and that thousands of chickens or hundreds of pigs perished; I can't prove it but I think it's done for the insurance money. There are laws here that should protect farm animals, but too few, too little, too late. Cows are usually kept in enormous barns and almost never allowed to walk outside. Pigs are loaded in trucks and hauled to Italy - three days without food or water - there slaugtered and made into Parma ham.... I can go on like this, there are so many wrongs. It's the reason that I eat only a little wild caught fish or an egg from a happy chicken with my vegetables. It doesn't help of course, but I don't want to be part of such a despicable system.

Amer, thanks for the info on the cactuses!

Comment by Joan Denoo on December 14, 2012 at 3:17pm

Chris, first of all, your beautiful cactuses look so content; you must have a green thumb! Well, I know you do because I saw your photos of your roof-garden. How cold do your winter temperatures get? I remember riding through the Netherlands and how impressed I was with its beauty and cleanliness. All houses and yards beautifully tended, the farm lands lovely green and farm animals looked so healthy. I would hate to have you see our feeder-lots, cows and calves up to ankles in mud, feed troughs over-crowded. Not a healthy sight at all. I don't remember seeing pig farms in your country. Ours can be smelled from miles away; just awful. I am not proud of our animal farming methods. When I was in Asia, the pig farms had no smell, there was no mud except in wallows. Much cleaner looking and smelling than the farms I have seen in USA. 


Amer, you impress me with your knowledge of the cactus species. I suspect you have much to teach me. 

Amer, how do you pronounce your name? A'mer? A mer'?

Comment by Joan Denoo on December 14, 2012 at 2:43pm

Amer, how different our lives are, and your closely bonded neighbors are most unusual to me. 

My neighborhood is more closely bonded than most USA neighbors in big cities and it is only 2-3 blocks long. We share common interests in our children growing up, one generation after another. I have lived here 38 years and the longest in these blocks. Other houses have changed owners many times in those years. We have little else in common, not religion or occupation, or education, or interests. We bond together because we want our children safe and our homes protected. 

Your experiences sound like long ancestral bonds exist with many things in common. Your architecture probably takes into account the extreme heat and long rain seasons with thick walls and good drainage. 

I notice the roads out of Islamabad have many winding curves and I assume they go into very high mountainous country. Google World maps also show heavy snows in mountains, but I don't know what season the photos were taken. Do you have harsh winters? 

Your ceremonies marking events in life are much larger than ones I participate in. I suppose mine are smaller and involve only close family and my small little neighborhood because I don't belong to a church or believe in a god. 

For a funeral to have 400 or 500 people participate reveals how closely knit your culture is. A marriage that lasts 5 or 6 days is not familiar to me at all. The social norms for you must keep you busy throughout a year. 

Wheat, barley, oats, lentils, and alfalfa hay grow right up to the city and covers much of easter Washington state. We have summers in the high 90 F (32 C)  and winters below freezing. The thought of living in 44 C  (110 F) just astonishes me. 

You and your region has much to teach us in the USA on how to survive and thrive with less energy use. We waste far too much oil, gas and coal and now must learn how to get off fossil fuels. 

What is your cooking and heating heat source? 

You write beautifully in English. What is your primary language? 

Thank you, Amer, for sharing with us. 

 

Comment by amer chohan on December 14, 2012 at 7:37am

Chris! larger one is cereus peruvianus formiing cristae, other five are mammillarias. Center one with a reddish head is nice spotless plant.

As for socialogy is concerend, social person like you wold have enjoyed here. Its not just visiting neighbours, things are done on a grand scale. Biggest of all is somebodie's death. Some 400 to 500 people gather on the death day alone. At least one male and one female member of each faimly of the adjoining villages pay one visit to the poor faimly within next 40 days.

Marriage is no smaller occasion. A simmilar number of people is involved at some stage or other of it. Marriage is usually 5 to 6 days affair with many sub-functions attached to it.

A child birth , a serious illness or building of a new house are though smaller than prior 2 but becomes source of visit of your own town people. One has to do it as must social duty and people show anger towards a person like me who don't like so much fuss arround.

Comment by Plinius on December 14, 2012 at 3:39am

We have a very closely netted society. You would be amazed to to know that every one knows each other upto names of grandfathers in a radius of almost 10km.

Thanks for your description, Amer! You mention something very valuable there that we have lost: here most people are on their own apart from some family and friends. Ah, yes, it would be almost impossible to know so many people here in one of the most densely populated areas in the world. I try to connect with my neighbours, and it's uphill work. I try anyway. Here are my unidentified cactuses:

Comment by amer chohan on December 14, 2012 at 3:02am

Life adjust itself to the conditions. In hot summer days schools and offices timings are adjusted as early from 7:00 am to 1:30pm. Schools are closed for summer vacations for 3 months(june,july & August). People rise up early(usualy at 5am) and sleep again in the hotest time of midday to rise up again at 5 t0 6 pm.

Very few people have air conditioars. Infact most of us are without any electricity during summer heat as we live in a country facing sever energy crises. We usualy experience eletricity shut downs of 12 hrs per day in summer.

Main crops of our area are wheat, corn, rapeseeds and peanut. I don't do any agri-activity as I run a privatly owned educational institution still I haven't bought any of above mentioned throughout my life as they come as a part of contract from persons using my inherited land for their harvest.

Life is not that easy and well-organised in our part as yours rather it is very difficut at times for most of people but it is very colorful with a lot of cultural activity. We have a very closely netted society. You would be amazed to to know that every one knows each other upto names of grandfathers in a radius of almost 10km.

 

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