Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 165
Latest Activity: 9 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
What's your gardening style?
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Wild Parsnip - It can burn skin.
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

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Comment by Joan Denoo on March 17, 2013 at 11:22pm
Sentient, yes, spring is so unpredictable; we have to be flexible and ready for anything. Breaking dormancy too early is a problem.
Comment by Joan Denoo on March 17, 2013 at 11:15pm
Dallas, your comment intrigued me and so I looked them up. My goodness, you have a lovely group of plants that may be vulnerable. They each are so pretty. Here is what I found:
Dallas the Phallus

Mammillaria mystax
https://www.google.com/search?q=mammillaria+mystax+cactus&hl=en...

Notocactus magnificus,
https://www.google.com/search?q=Notocactus+magnificus,&hl=en&am...

Spaghetti Strap agaves,
https://www.google.com/search?q=Spaghetti+Strap+agaves,&hl=en&a...

Opuntia microdasys
https://www.google.com/search?q=Opuntia+microdasys&hl=en&so...

Mammillaria hahania
https://www.google.com/search?q=Mammillaria+hahania&hl=en&s...

Tecomaria
https://www.google.com/search?q=Tecomaria&hl=en&source=lnms...

Do you have many left? What was your temperature that caused the problems? The Dallas area should be able to provide enough warmth; I am surprised.
Comment by Sentient Biped on March 17, 2013 at 10:58pm

Joan,

We had some hail today in Battleground.  A couple of nights anticipated in high 20s or below 32.  This is the cruel part of early spring here - trees bloom, and having lost the protection of dormancy, die in a freeze.  Or at least, no fruit.  

But, that's the joy of gardening.  We never know!

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 17, 2013 at 10:54pm

Below freezing last night and a snifter of snow in Spokane today. 

Comment by A Former Member on March 17, 2013 at 10:40pm

Those are handsome, Amer. You're doing a good job. Winter was hard on mine. I lost a couple, including my Mammilaria mystax. A few more are less than vigorous, and I think I'm going to lose one of my Notocactus magnifcans, one of my Spaghetti Strap agaves, and possibly my large Opuntia microdaisys and my Mammilaria hahania (if I spelled all of those correctly, don't want to look them up).

Though my xmas cactus I bought for a dollar looks like it is going to bloom again. 

I also think I lost my Tecomaria for good to the freeze, though I'm still holding onto some hope for it. 

Comment by Sentient Biped on March 17, 2013 at 10:30pm

West end of my front yard. Hollywood plum is blooming. Lots of spring bulbs popping up.

 

Comment by Sentient Biped on March 16, 2013 at 10:38pm

Amer, beautiful cacti!

Comment by amer chohan on March 16, 2013 at 7:18pm

Wonderful Joan. Thanks for the post. The guay got a wonderful protective mechanisim.

Oligodynamic effect of some metals also makes sense. But talking of metals, highly reactive metal of group 1 and 2(alkali and alkali earth metals) like Na and K etc are usualy found alredy in compound forms. Atleast surfaces of less reactive metals like Fe etc are in compound forms. Silver, gold etc are notorious for being highly un-reactive, which weakens their status to effect enzimes action. None the less a wonderful idea for a little bit of mental activity. Thanks for the post again.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 16, 2013 at 3:08pm
Some Insect Wings Are Natural Antibiotics
http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/smartnews/2013/03/some-insect-wings...

I first met a Cicada when I lived in Washington, D.C. and was startled at first. Upon doing a little reading I discovered they are a very compelling insect; a joy to watch.
We don't have them in Washington state.
Comment by Plinius on March 16, 2013 at 1:40am

Thanks for the pictures Amer, they're so beautiful!

 

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