Godless in the garden

Information

Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 168
Latest Activity: 9 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
What's your gardening style?
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Wild Parsnip - It can burn skin.
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

Discussion Forum

Bunga Bakawali or Tan Hua (Epiphyllum oxypetallum)

Started by Sentient Biped. Last reply by Joan Denoo yesterday. 13 Replies

Backyard Organic Garden

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo yesterday. 7 Replies

Compost

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Sentient Biped yesterday. 4 Replies

"Healthy Soil Microbes / Healthy People"

Started by Sentient Biped. Last reply by Joan Denoo on Saturday. 26 Replies

Permaculture Transformation In 90 Days

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Aug 27. 2 Replies

Sugar Baby

Started by Don. Last reply by Don Aug 24. 11 Replies

Evans Bali cherry

Started by Don. Last reply by Don Aug 24. 4 Replies

Asparagus

Started by Čenek Sekavec. Last reply by Idaho Spud Aug 23. 4 Replies

Comment Wall

Comment

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Comment by Annie Thomas on August 24, 2013 at 6:51am

Joan-  I did purchase a traditional paella pan in Valencia, but no new spices.  I haven't used it yet though.

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 23, 2013 at 10:36pm

Spud, that rain storm sounds dreadful! Is that a usual event? Maybe it is part of the new normal. I wonder if row covers would have protected them, such as seen here: Wire Hoop Row cover https://www.naturalgardening.com/shop/Rowcover_instructions.php3 

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 23, 2013 at 10:21pm

Annie, very much like your report on Spain and your culinary delights. Did you find some new seasonings to add to your menus? I like your term gastrogeography". Sounds like a very interesting project. 

Comment by Patricia on August 23, 2013 at 9:06pm

Looooove olives!!!!!

Comment by Annie Thomas on August 23, 2013 at 8:24pm

My garden is a complete mess, as I just returned from a trip to Spain and quickly dove back into work.  I am a teacher, so the lazy days of summer are behind me and I hope I can catch up before fall planting time.  I thought I'd share a couple of photos from Spain.  My two hobbies are gardening and cooking, and so I am naturally fascinated by what other cultures grow and eat.  Olives were center stage in Spain.  Whether it be infused into dishes or simply presented as a tapas before a meal, I've learned that I love olives more than I ever knew.  Other crops that were prevalent in Southern Spain were grapes (lots of grapes, and lots of wine!), sunflowers, tomatoes, almonds, oranges, cork bark,and something that looked very much like the thistle we have growing wild in North Central Florida.  I still must research that. Honey is also widely produced, though I didn't see any hives from my views on the highways.  I have a strong interest in what I call gastrogeography.... how food traveled from one place to the next.  I need to research when tomatoes and sunflowers found their way to Spain from the New World.  I know the sunflower came in the 16th century, and other than oil and seeds I am not sure what they use them for.

Wishing you all the best- Annie

Comment by Annie Thomas on August 23, 2013 at 8:11pm

Joan-  I've been out of the loop for a while, but I was so glad to read that you are feeling well.  I love your avatar!

Comment by Idaho Spud on August 23, 2013 at 7:38pm

Patricia, that is some yummy-looking bread!

Comment by Idaho Spud on August 23, 2013 at 6:56pm

Joan, very glad to hear your feeling great.

I've had next to no rain this summer, but today it came with a vengeance!  It's been thoring, raining, and hailing for 4 hours now.  It was so heavy for a while that the street was like a river.  It covered most of my property and washed-away all the bark under my pear tree.  

I like all the rain, but the hail was not kind to my watermelon plants.  I don't know how bad it is yet, but It took pieces out of them here and there, and they don't look happy.  Hope it doesn't set them back too much.

Comment by Plinius on August 23, 2013 at 12:47am

Sentient, the blue flower is Lobelia siphilitica - as far as I know the flowers of a lobelia turn upside down before opening.

Freezing herbs is easy: wash, dry on kitchen paper for a minute, cut with scissors over a container and put it in the freezer. Easy enough to take out a spoonful when needed.

Thanks for all the compliments! The bamboo on the wall is in an old holder for a flower box.  And that bread looks very enticing - almost a pity I stopped eating carbohydrates.

Comment by Patricia on August 22, 2013 at 8:54pm

Yes, Joan. The yard has such a nice fragrance every year, & we also have a Russian Olive tree in front that also has a beautiful fragrance along side the lilacs. We like plenty of color & have lots of flowers in the back yard as well. Petunias, mini roses, peonies, lilacs, etc.

 

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