Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 165
Latest Activity: 8 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
What's your gardening style?
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Wild Parsnip - It can burn skin.
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

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Comment by Idaho Spud on August 23, 2013 at 6:56pm

Joan, very glad to hear your feeling great.

I've had next to no rain this summer, but today it came with a vengeance!  It's been thoring, raining, and hailing for 4 hours now.  It was so heavy for a while that the street was like a river.  It covered most of my property and washed-away all the bark under my pear tree.  

I like all the rain, but the hail was not kind to my watermelon plants.  I don't know how bad it is yet, but It took pieces out of them here and there, and they don't look happy.  Hope it doesn't set them back too much.

Comment by Plinius on August 23, 2013 at 12:47am

Sentient, the blue flower is Lobelia siphilitica - as far as I know the flowers of a lobelia turn upside down before opening.

Freezing herbs is easy: wash, dry on kitchen paper for a minute, cut with scissors over a container and put it in the freezer. Easy enough to take out a spoonful when needed.

Thanks for all the compliments! The bamboo on the wall is in an old holder for a flower box.  And that bread looks very enticing - almost a pity I stopped eating carbohydrates.

Comment by Patricia on August 22, 2013 at 8:54pm

Yes, Joan. The yard has such a nice fragrance every year, & we also have a Russian Olive tree in front that also has a beautiful fragrance along side the lilacs. We like plenty of color & have lots of flowers in the back yard as well. Petunias, mini roses, peonies, lilacs, etc.

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 22, 2013 at 8:29pm

The humming birds have moved from the Monarda to culinary sage blossoms, phlox, a second flowering of honeysuckle, and Perovskia sage.

I am letting the flowers go to seed and save them for my daughter. Deer eat all the usual garden flowers and perhaps some of the self-sewers will survive their great appetites. They also have a bunny that comes around when dusk closes in. They take their nibbles out of what is left after the deer dine. Well, we will see. The Monarda and Oregano roots should survive their munching. The moles have taken over one part of their garden so I am going to do a bit of research to learn how to convince the little diggers to leave the flower and future vegetable beds and go to the forest. If anyone has any ideas, please share with me. We don't want to kill them, just use natural deterrents.  

Larry has built fences around their fruit trees and plans to do the same with flowers and vegetables raised beds.

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 22, 2013 at 8:07pm

Patricia, how beautiful! Nourishment in every bite. Your petunias are so pretty; are they the fragrant kind. I like the color variety you selected. My grandmothers both grew very lovely fragrant petunias that I rarely smell these days. I hope someone saved those old seeds. 

Daniel, the sedum look like my "Autumn Joy". In the spring I take cuttings off of new growth and put them my garden near a soaker hose. Now I have very many coming up each year in places that tend to be empty. Or start them in a starter box and move them to wherever. Bees love them.

Spud, your butterfly on mint is so pretty.  Next year will be much easier on you and you can grow things in your prepared soil. 

Chris, your garden looks so lush and cool. A great place for a nice chat!

All of your photos give me a real lift. 

Comment by Patricia on August 22, 2013 at 7:09pm

Fresh out of the oven.....my high fiber bread....

Comment by Joan Denoo on August 22, 2013 at 3:44pm

For my dear friends of Godless in the Garden, I am fully back on my feet and feeling great. My skills for fighting depression helped, but that is not the whole story with cancer. Grief counseling made a huge difference, and I can learn those skills.

I am reading your posts and enjoying gardening with you. My son-in-law, Larry, is preparing raised beds and using materials from his horse barn as well as a huge compost that has been sitting in the middle of a field for several years for filler. He should have great success. He has a small tractor and moving the materials will be easy. He also has help from his children and grandchildren. Oh yes, they are going to do just fine.   

Comment by Idaho Spud on August 22, 2013 at 2:00pm

Sentient, I'll let you know.  

A few days ago, I harvested a cantaloupe, but it was over-ripe.  Still tasted better than store-bought 'loupes.

I noticed it becoming orange for a week or more before I picked it, but I incorrectly assumed it wasn't ready yet.

 It had grown to nearly it's full size while still in the container.  I was so busy with modifying my soil that it was one of the container starts that I didn't take time to put in the soil.

I finally planted it in the soil, but the plant didn't do much.  The leaves looked sick and the vines lengthened very little.  I guess I just assumed it would take longer to ripen the fruit because it was so sick.  Perhaps the opposite is true.

The day I harvested it, I wasn't intending to, but I looked at it while doing something else, and noticed that the melon had almost separated from the vine, and it looked mushy where the vine was attached.  It may not have tasted great even if I'd picked it earlier, what with the stress I put it through.

Sentient, some time ago, you asked me to let you know how my attempts to start cuttings from my cherry tree worked.  Well, they didn't do a thing.  No roots and no new leaves.  I'll wait for fall to try cuttings from other trees as you recommended.

Comment by Sentient Biped on August 22, 2013 at 1:29pm

Patricia the flowers are beautiful! Petunias are one of my favorites.  Those are really colorful.

Spud, please post when you harvest your melon!  I'll do the same if/when I harvest my miniature cantaloupes.  They at least have a chance.  Great pics of the butterflies too!

My own interest in bees surprises me.  It's been a growing obsession.  I've been watching mints and related plants and their visitors.  Bumblebees, tiny pollinating bees, honeybees, butterflies.  Mints are late blooming and provide forage when other sources are becoming scarce. 

I watch at the grocery store garden section for what plants attract bees, and occasionally by one based on what I observe.  Added some asters this week for that reason.  Also moved 2 very big sedum plants to the bee garden.  I had them in my old yard, pending moving them to the bee garden.  Even though it's summer, they are so dry tolerant they moved without problems.  I think they are doing better after moving, because now they are getting watered.

Chris, do you give your herbs any special treatment before you freeze them?  What is the blue flower?  I'm thinking it's a Salvia.

This is one of the sedums I moved.  The photo was last year - it's not quite to this stage yet.  Even so, honeybees started to visit within one day of planting in the bee garden

Comment by Idaho Spud on August 21, 2013 at 4:00pm

Nice flowers Patricia & Chris.  Chris, I just noticed your cat in your last photo.  Also, is that bamboo hanging on the wall.  That's what I should do with mine.  It's always in the way.

You all are eating healthier than me.  I've been spending all my time on watermelon and didn't plant much else this year.  My Moon & Stars watermelon looks huge under it's cover.  I keep it covered with a green cloth so it's out of sight, because it's right by the sidewalk and alley, and I don't want to tempt people too much.  

I'll have to uncover it and take a look one of these days. I've been putting it off because it's hard tucking the cloth back under the leaves with a long-reach tool over the fence.  I don't want to walk inside the fence because the place is covered with vines and leaves.

I got a nice surprise a few days ago.  I spotted another Moon & Stars watermelon under all the leaves.  It's about as big as my first one was when I took it's picture.  I also have a small Sugar Baby watermelon that's looking like it may ripen in a few weeks.

Sentient, you've made me conscious of bees and I often watch them enjoying my watermelon and mint flowers.  They seem to love the tiny mint flowers that have been blooming for a long time now.

I've also noticed a rabble of small butterflies on the mint when the day gets warm.  Took some pictures, but they're not as good as they should be.  Most are out of focus and I've forgotten how to access the close-up feature of my camera.  Anyhoo, they have a 1 inch wingspan, and one day I saw one that looked just like them except it had a 2 inch wingspan:

 

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