Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 165
Latest Activity: 1 hour ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
What's your gardening style?
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Wild Parsnip - It can burn skin.
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

Discussion Forum

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

Comment Wall

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Comment by Sentient Biped on November 7, 2013 at 8:46am
Sorry for the typos. Ipad not best choice for my typing.
Comment by Sentient Biped on November 7, 2013 at 8:43am
Randall, pluease do indulge. You live in a beautiful setting! I would love to have more trees for sll of their benefits, including compost! Sometimes I have raked neighbors' yards for that reason!

The local composting place has mountains of leaves, yard trimmings, and wood / plywood / particle board waste. I suspect the demolition stuff goes into the yard waste compost - the grinding is much more coarse thsn. the leaf compost. I much prefer the leaf. Leaf compost is $26 a cubic yard which completely fills up my little pickup truck.

Iwill need another truckload for the other trees snd shrubs, and one last one for the ladt 1 and 1/2 raised beds. Not in a hurry.

Deer have buun chewing down a row of winter onions. I thought they didnt eat onions! I putdownsome chicken wire but those onions are almost destroyed now.


The best thing aboutcompost mulch in the orchard is its done for winter. Except one seedling tree to move,another to replace it, and one large plum to trim. No loss if none of those gets done before Spring. On my inspections, most have loads of incipient flower buds so weather and other dactors permitting next ring will be nice.
Comment by Randall Smith on November 7, 2013 at 8:25am

And yes, the view (previous) is from my garden with Brussels sprouts in the forground, house in shadows in the rear. Let me try another angle (if I may indulge).

Comment by Randall Smith on November 7, 2013 at 8:20am

Daniel, your "truckload of leaf compost" sounds a lot easier that my raking, hauling, compacting, and waiting for my leaf and pine needle bounty to process. Check out this photo of only a part of my yard.

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 7, 2013 at 12:47am

Randall, I know what you mean about garden design that is a more wild and natural looking garden. The great thing about these photos is the chance to see combinations of colors, forms, textures, stuff like that. 

Daniel, your truckload of leaf compost is a goldmine! Your trees will reward your care and attention. Feeling good in the garden ... something one can't buy. 

Comment by Sentient Biped on November 6, 2013 at 5:48pm

Joan, those are lovely gardens.  I woujld love to spend an afternoon!

I'm afraid I'm not very whimsical, graceful, or stylish....  more botanical.  Each of us has our own muse, so to speak.

This week I got a truckload of leaf compost.  I placed a layer on top of the decomposing straw and grass clipping mulch, around each of the trees in my orchard.  They grew nicely this year.  The compost will prepare them for next growing season.  Also around some of the other shrubs and trees.  Made me feel good.

Comment by Randall Smith on November 6, 2013 at 7:12am

Joan: I drool over Eden-like garden pictures (if I may use the term) that belong to others. But in my real world, it'll never happen here. I like to say I prefer a wilder, more natural look. Truth is, I just don't have the time or desire to make a showcase yard and garden.

Comment by Joan Denoo on November 5, 2013 at 10:08pm
A garden design for the southeastern part of USA. Lovely colors, shapes, textures, with grace and style.
Jeff's season finale in Tennessee
http://www.finegardening.com/item/30527/jeffs-season-finale-in-tenn...
Comment by Joan Denoo on November 4, 2013 at 10:21am
This garden is chuck full of whimsy!
"We have slowly removed lawn to create a raised bed garden, a little red hen house, and a garden full of hydrangeas, perennials, and other flowers. So much more productive and fun than the old lawn! I have a blog at www.theradishpatch.com where we share our garden adventures. There's nothing better than sharing the love of gardening!"
~ Donna Jones in Santa Rosa, California.
Donna's shrinking-lawn garden in California
http://www.finegardening.com/item/30513/donnas-shrinking-lawn-garde...
Comment by Sentient Biped on November 3, 2013 at 9:16pm

Just checking on plants for next year.  Found what Burpee claims is a short season dwarf okra, suitable for containers.  That might make okra a doable plant for this cool summer climate.

This year I started some indoors and some in a raised bed.  I read okra can't be transplanted.  It turned out, the direct-seeded ones germinated but never grew beyond about 4 little leaves.  The transplanted ones grew to about a foot tall, and I got all of 6 pods on 4 plants!  They were good!

I must be crazy, already planning for spring.  Still, it's better than actually doing something!

 

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