Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 167
Latest Activity: 5 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
What's your gardening style?
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Wild Parsnip - It can burn skin.
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

Discussion Forum

Permaculture Transformation In 90 Days

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo on Wednesday. 2 Replies

Backyard Organic Garden

Started by Joan Denoo on Tuesday. 0 Replies

Sugar Baby

Started by Don. Last reply by Don Aug 24. 11 Replies

Evans Bali cherry

Started by Don. Last reply by Don Aug 24. 4 Replies

Asparagus

Started by Čenek Sekavec. Last reply by Idaho Spud Aug 23. 4 Replies

Some pictures from my garden

Started by Steph S.. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jul 26. 7 Replies

The Next Green Revolution May Rely on Microbes

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Sentient Biped Jun 30. 2 Replies

Comment Wall

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Comment by Patricia on March 19, 2014 at 2:14pm

ARRRRGH!!!! We're snowing......but there are robins visiting the yard! Seems weird.

Comment by Sentient Biped on March 18, 2014 at 8:14am
Randall I like the food producing trees too. I was surprised to learn even maples, lindens, and sourwoods produce tons of nectar for honey. We just have to know how to harvest it. So my definition of food tree expanded.

I am hoping my lindens bloom this year. They are small trees - the largest about 12 foot tall - but I can hope.

I have a big maple but the land is part of an easement so I worry that someone will destroy it.
Comment by Randall Smith on March 18, 2014 at 8:04am

Those days of tree-lined streets are gone. I was devastated when all the hard maples on "Main Avenue" were cut down in my home town. Then, when some cities tried to beautify their avenues, they planted invasive "Tree of Heaven" (Ailanthus) trees! Nashville comes to mind. 

Pesonnally, if I plant a new tree, it'll bare fruits or nuts. Might as well get something edible out of it. 

Comment by Sentient Biped on March 18, 2014 at 7:53am
Josn what a beautiful street.

There should be more honor given to old trees. Not that we should have laws preventing owners from cutting all old trees, but removing them prevents the next generations from having these majestic living things. So thinking twice, three times, longer, before cutting them down. And then planting 5 for every one removed, snd nurturing those 5 to maturity.

Plus they sequester co2, cool their surroundings, and provide habitat.

My little editorial on trees. I also think we should promote growing trees from seeds. They grow faster, better, stronger, more genetic diversity, more resilient, compared to grafted clones. Those old trees can be a source of genetic diversity for future generations, too.
Comment by Joan Denoo on March 16, 2014 at 3:00pm

Yes, Spokane is noted for its urban forest. They were planted early in the building of the city, from the late 1880s on. Sadly those giant trees lined streets built for horse and buggy. When the paved streets were put in, many trees were taken out, or allowed to remain with the result that sidewalks and streets get dislodged by growing roots. The telephone lines run through the trees and so the power company keeps the tops cut out in anticipation of snow and ice causing power failures.

There is a project going on now to replace those old trees with new ones that are far enough away from concrete and asphalt to cause no problems, or choosing species that do not interfere. 

This photo is of Grand Blvd, 1/2 block from my home. It used to be the main dirt road to the south of downtown. Many gorgeous mansions lined the blvd; most are gone now. This Manito Park was designed by the famed Olmsted Brothers in 1913. They designed Central Park in NYC. 

The basalt outcropping on the near left is common for my street. Many such exposures occur and are used as part of landscape designs. The Ponderosa pines are part of the ancient forest that covered the city. The maples were planted by the early wealthy miners and loggers who built their mansions, thus the south hill became known as the wealthy part of town. Halfway up the sharp incline is a cement water trough put there in 1907 for the horses to drink and rest. It is interesting to see the little bungalows and cottages built between the mansions as the wealth dried up. 

There is some grumbling in the autumn because of all the falling maple leaves and the plugged sewers. Homeowners are supposed to clear their yard waste, but many try to rake leaves into the street where the big machinery gathers them. Much growling goes on with the city scolding the homeowners, and homeowners claiming it is the city's responsibility. City ordinances name the owners. 

This is a Google Earth photo and probably taken in late summer. 

Comment by Sentient Biped on March 16, 2014 at 8:48am

Joan, thanks for posting on pruning the ancient ginkgo.  It's amazing.  Here in the US, by necessity we think of ancient trees as having been planted by nature.  Apparently that tree was planted by a person.  Amazing.

Around here, and I think in most of the US, there is little reverence for trees.  Most people seek excuses to cut them down.

We are getting some Spring here.  I needed it so bad.  Hope Spring comes your way soon as well.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 15, 2014 at 12:10pm
Comment by Plinius on March 14, 2014 at 1:40am

Stiil far too busy, but spring is still here; the garlic grew on as if there was no winter at all - and there wasn't any winter, just some night frost and some extra rain. Grape hyacinths, rosemary and some other low shrubs (forgot the name) in flower. Sowed some allysum and tagetes inside. The vegetables will have to wait.

Comment by Joan Denoo on March 13, 2014 at 10:55pm

Patches of snow at the south end of the garden where there is deep shade. Boo, too. 

Comment by Randall Smith on March 13, 2014 at 7:55am

I've got several "pre-garden" things going (growing) indoors. Cilantro, radishes, and soybean sprouts. Never have tried the latter. Think I'll use them in a spinach salad. Snow cover still on the garden. Boo.

 

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