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Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 173
Latest Activity: 1 hour ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

Living in the forest

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith 4 hours ago. 4 Replies

Good plants that volunteer.

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Idaho Spud 21 hours ago. 17 Replies

Air-pots

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Daniel W May 2. 2 Replies

Air-pots

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud May 2. 1 Reply

Rooftop Gardens

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud Apr 3. 20 Replies

How to Make a Food Forest Suburb

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Idaho Spud Apr 1. 1 Reply

Fantastic Fungi - a film by Louie Schwartzberg

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Mar 28. 1 Reply

Michael Pollan On Joel Salatin's Polyface Farm

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Randall Smith Mar 22. 1 Reply

Comment Wall

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Comment by Randall Smith on December 18, 2014 at 7:45am

Daniel, not only are the persimmons delicious to eat, the tree itself is magnificent--and you don't have to prune it (self pruning from heavy persimmon loaded branches). I have to say, however, only about one in two persimmons have been edible this year. I've had to spit out (with a "yuck") many of them. I hate when that happens. The tree is still loaded this late in the season.

Good luck in finding an American persimmon. Furthermore, lots of luck in getting them to grow. I tried twice (catalogue trees) and failed. That's when I started them from my own seeds.

As far as pawpaws ("Indiana banana)", I can live without them.

Comment by Amy on December 17, 2014 at 10:29pm
Daniel, also look at www.fast-growing-trees.com. they have alot of awesome varieties
Comment by Daniel W on December 17, 2014 at 10:19pm

OK Randy, you have me thinking about growing American persimmons!  I see Starks has 2 varieties that bear without a pollinating male.  Burnt Ridge has some too.

I need to get outside and quit looking at online catalogs!

Comment by Daniel W on December 14, 2014 at 12:43pm
Randy I agree. bMy philosophy is, it's not about having, it's about creating. It's not about knowing, it's about learning. It's not about being, it's about growing. Or something like that.

On the other hand, I would love to have a persimmon of my own growing right now. I found some ripe Hichaya persimmons at the store this week. They were heaven. My Saijo persimmon tree is about 7 foot tall. Maybe 2015 will be the year?

The Nikita's Gift American /Asian hybrid persimmon is smaller, so that will probably be a longer wait.

I also keep checking the pawpaw buds. One of those might be big enough in 2015 but Im not holding my breath waiting.
Comment by Randall Smith on December 14, 2014 at 8:16am

I think half the fun of gardening is experimenting. One certainly learns by doing, which includes making mistakes.

Barbara, with my leaves, I simply put them in a big pile next to my compost bin(s). Then, in the spring and summer, I alternate them with grass clippings and soil or my horse manure. I think only twice did the pile ever get hot. I accept cold composting over a longer period of time.

Amy, welcome to the group. A couple of words about squash: I save and plant many seeds, Delicata being my fave. And I enjoy the variety of hybrids that result. Some offspring are really bizarre!

Comment by Barbara Livingston on December 14, 2014 at 8:07am

Joan,

Wouldn't it be fun to hear Mr. Nichol talking about being a tree nurseryman? My brain finally was able to convert the "f" to a "s" as I read. Composting was a "rot heap". :)  Did you notice he talks of the American Ash? It's funny how in my subdivision the developer planted one ash tree in front of every house - and people complain about them. As the book was written in 1812 it makes me wonder where the tree originated and why it was grown in Scotland. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on December 14, 2014 at 2:10am

Amy, I like your idea of the kiddos jump on bags of leaves. That should do the trick. 

There is another method that is common with old timers. It is called "block and chop". It involves a wood stump about knee high. The women would grab a handful of leaves of branches or whatever, and chop, chop, chop. 

Mr Nicol's Gardener Kalendar, Planter's and Nurferyman's Kalendar

published in Edinburgh, (sic)

I can't find the date. 


Comment by Joan Denoo on December 14, 2014 at 1:50am

Barbara, You may have been ok to have left th leaves on the bare ground. As You so well know, nature loves to fill in bar spots with seeds that like to travel. I agree with Daniel, with your soil and air temperatures will work quickly to compost leaves. I wouldn't put leaves around perennial or annual plants, shrubs or trees. I suspect the blower/vac/mulcher will cut the leaves fine enough to start the decomposing process. I had huge composts when I lived in El Paso and Fort Hood. I just tossed leaves and kitchen vegetables and fruit trimmings in without cutting them up. I was able to build the soils in both places to produce beautiful soil. 

You are too hard on yourself, Barbara. Take a deep breath, get into a Zen mood, walk through the yard picking up things and pulling weeds as you go and empty your bucket or basket of stuff in the compost, then go have a nice glass of iced tea. Your garden will grow if you stick to the basics. 

I have to admit, Central Texas soil is a real challenge. I think I told we went out to the open range and gathered a pickup full of cow pies. I had the most beautiful crop of Buffalo gourds, with bitter fruit and very deep roots systems. They are perennial, so I had to get them out as soon as they sprouted. I did have beautiful soil at Ft. Hood. 

Comment by Amy on December 13, 2014 at 9:04pm
I use leaves in my compost pile often, and I never get mold. But my mom bags here's up for me and I let's my boys jump on them to break them up first lol they break down quickly for me after being pulverized
Comment by Daniel W on December 13, 2014 at 8:04pm
Barbara I'm just guessing but I think in your hot climate, the leaves will compost very fast. Also, I think after running them through your mulcher, they are at least crinkled up so wont make soggy flat layers. They dont have to be ground up fine, just rough chop and crinkly.

My climate is so wet, one would think leaves would pack down and be soggy. But they really made a nice mulch, and are already breaking down. I figure if the forest does well with leaves left in place, so will my yard.

Butternut is my favorite squash. I want to plant some of those, and some summer squash, then various types just for novelty. Like Joan, we still have a bunch waiting to be cooked.

I dont know what will happen with the squash seeds from grocery store. I think they should grow OK. If they were not grown in isolation from other squashes, you might get a weird hybrid. Also if they are a hybrid variety, they may not come true. I think most betternut and most acorn squash are not hybrids, but Im not certain.
 

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