Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 166
Latest Activity: 5 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
What's your gardening style?
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Wild Parsnip - It can burn skin.
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

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Comment by Sentient Biped on May 10, 2013 at 9:06am

Another link from Washington State (King County) - now I'm certain you are right!  Looks like they are an introduced species here.  They consider this tree a weed.  However, short of any eradication efforts, I'll keep them.  They provide land stabilization near the creek, privacy, bird food, and fill a gap for pollen and nectar for honey bees.  

 

Image from wikipedia  looks just like it.  Thank you again!

File:Common hawthorn.jpg

Comment by Sentient Biped on May 10, 2013 at 8:58am

Chris and Joan, thank you for the identification!  I think you are right.  OSU link on Hawthorn species.   I havent looked for thorns yet.  It's mixed with blackberry so I don't venture into the thicket.  There are a lot of broken branches, which goes along with trees breaking in storms.

I will watch for berries this summer.

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 10, 2013 at 1:42am

Sentient, I don't know how to get my photo over here, but if you go to my post, Thumbnail

Comment by Joan Denoo on May 10, 2013 at 1:06am
I think you might be right, Chris. It looks like Hawthorn to me. When I was in Ireland, they were in bloom, a white blossom, and grew along hedgerows between pastures of sheep. They have needles and the tree is very brittle.
On returning home, I bought a Washington Hawthorn, with white blossoms and the birds loved it. The thorns were terrible, the berries and blossoms outstanding, and in one wind storm, half the tree fell and we tried to save it by bolting it together. It lasted about five years and then the whole tree broke and it is now my birdfeeder. Sprouds come up all around the ground with new trees and I just cut the roots. I don't have the energy to clean up after a fragile tree. But I do miss it, especially now, just before peonies bloom, the Hawthorn put on an elegant show.
Comment by Plinius on May 10, 2013 at 12:55am

I think a hawthorn. I cannot see much of the leaves but it's the right time. Hawthorn has got some family members that look almost the same, so if it isn't the one, it's the other...

Comment by Sentient Biped on May 9, 2013 at 9:39pm

Hi all,

Any ideas as to identity of this tree?  I don't know.  It reminds me of spirea, but much bigger.  There is a row of them on a neglected area on my property.  They are near a creek that runs in fall/winter/spring, dry in summer.  I think I see them growing wild in fence rows, so either native or feral.  These reach about 30 feet tall, have bark like cherries.  Wild, sweet, and tart cherry trees are all finished blooming here.  Tart cherries just barely.  This mystery tree just started blooming.  i'm not aware of fruit but might not have noticed last year.  The flowers have a musty/sweet scent, sort of like Bradford pear, but fruiting pears here are long since finished blooming.

 

Bees like the flowers, which is good. We seem to be in a minor nectar and pollen low until something else takes over.

Comment by Sentient Biped on May 4, 2013 at 10:14pm

This was lush growth a few days ago.  Then it frosted.  

 

Oh well.  Into every life a little frost must land.  I think they'll grow back.

I wouldn't like mice or rats in my compost.  I found a mouse nest in the well house.  Fortunately they ran off before I had to make a decision about eliminating them.  

Comment by Annie Thomas on May 4, 2013 at 9:18pm

I'm enjoying the comments about killing viruses in composts.  I like to add horse manure to my compost, as it really makes it cook. I am abandoning one compost pile as I have at least one rat living in there.  I'll set up a new one in a sunnier area and hope I have more luck.

It was too rainy and chilly for any naked gardening here today... maybe next week? ;-)

And Dominic that serpent gourd vine is incredible... it looks like fine lace.  I'm off to look it up!

Comment by Dominic Florio on May 4, 2013 at 7:57pm

Comment by Idaho Spud on May 4, 2013 at 3:16pm

So, you think you've out-skunked the skunk?  Hope so.

 

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