Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 170
Latest Activity: 54 minutes ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

"All I want for christmas is....."

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Larry yesterday. 8 Replies

Gardening in central Texas "pan" soil

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston yesterday. 3 Replies

An Old Lady's Hugelkultur Bed

Started by Barbara Livingston. Last reply by Randall Smith Dec 10. 3 Replies

Permaculture Concept. Bill Mollison

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Dec 6. 2 Replies

My south garden 1993 & 2013

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Dec 1. 1 Reply

Permaculture, Ben Falk

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 30. 0 Replies

Permaculture, Bill Mollison

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 16. 0 Replies

Plant Labels

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Joan Denoo Nov 8. 21 Replies

Design with Nature

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 6. 0 Replies

Sepp Holzer´s Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Nov 6. 1 Reply

Comment Wall

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Comment by Joan Denoo on November 8, 2013 at 1:56pm
Spud, I don't have any pitcher plants or carnivorous plants. I looked to see to what you might be referring, and see nothing similar. My hunch is, carnivorous require swampy places.
According to "Horticulture & Home Pest News",
http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/hortnews/1998/12-11-1998/carnplants....
"Their Culture:Carnivorous plants require a moist, acidic growing medium, high relative humidity, and bright light.

According to "General Care of Carnivorous Plants",
http://www.carnivorousplantnursery.com/info/growing.htm.
"Always use mineral-free water with your carnivorous plants, such as rainwater or distilled water. Try keeping a bucket near the downspout to collect rainwater. Distilled water can be purchased at the grocery store, but avoid bottled drinking water."

My hunch is your soil and water have very high mineral content.
Comment by Randall Smith on November 8, 2013 at 7:33am

Thanks (my place). Been there for 36 years. Taller trees. When I first moved, there were 5 trees. Now I have over 75, a mix of pine, deciduous, and fruit, all on one acre. Gotta leave room for a garden!

Comment by Plinius on November 8, 2013 at 12:59am

What a beautiful place, Randall!

Comment by Daniel W on November 7, 2013 at 8:47pm

couldn't get topic to post - here is a link.

 

Comment by Daniel W on November 7, 2013 at 8:43pm

Spud I think the earthworms will love your partially composted compost.  I've done that sort of thing in the past.  I think it works well.  And it might support soil bacteria and fungi.

 

On an related but different topic....  if you don't mind subtitles, Phosphorus and mycorrhizal fungi, and how those fungi might save the world....

 

 

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 7, 2013 at 11:07am

My compost pile, which is visible from the sidewalk, was looking ugly because of all the weeds, watermelon, squash, and pear waste that were doing almost nothing because of the cold weather.

So...I buried it all in the watermelon area, as well as the leaves that had fallen.  Digging the hole, I didn't see many earthworms.  I hope that's because most are just deep to keep warm.  Also hoping all that organic matter will help them proliferate.

I'm going to add some more soil & sand to the spots that have settled and top it with finer compost and peat moss.

Comment by Idaho Spud on November 7, 2013 at 10:55am

Like Randall, I enjoy looking at a neat beautiful garden, but I don't have space or time to make mine that way.  I have many other things I want to do.  Even though gardening is valuable and the most enjoyable enterprise I have, It's not my whole life.

Joan, I noticed in your last reference to the southeastern garden, I noticed some pitcher plants.  I've always been fascinated by carnivorous plants.

About 40 years ago I tried growing some venus fly-traps in my house.  Besides being very interesting, I thought they might eliminate some of the flies in the house.  I obviously didn't know how to take care of them, because they died very quickly.  I'd like to try again some day.

Comment by Daniel W on November 7, 2013 at 8:46am
Sorry for the typos. Ipad not best choice for my typing.
Comment by Daniel W on November 7, 2013 at 8:43am
Randall, pluease do indulge. You live in a beautiful setting! I would love to have more trees for sll of their benefits, including compost! Sometimes I have raked neighbors' yards for that reason!

The local composting place has mountains of leaves, yard trimmings, and wood / plywood / particle board waste. I suspect the demolition stuff goes into the yard waste compost - the grinding is much more coarse thsn. the leaf compost. I much prefer the leaf. Leaf compost is $26 a cubic yard which completely fills up my little pickup truck.

Iwill need another truckload for the other trees snd shrubs, and one last one for the ladt 1 and 1/2 raised beds. Not in a hurry.

Deer have buun chewing down a row of winter onions. I thought they didnt eat onions! I putdownsome chicken wire but those onions are almost destroyed now.


The best thing aboutcompost mulch in the orchard is its done for winter. Except one seedling tree to move,another to replace it, and one large plum to trim. No loss if none of those gets done before Spring. On my inspections, most have loads of incipient flower buds so weather and other dactors permitting next ring will be nice.
Comment by Randall Smith on November 7, 2013 at 8:25am

And yes, the view (previous) is from my garden with Brussels sprouts in the forground, house in shadows in the rear. Let me try another angle (if I may indulge).

 

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