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Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 169
Latest Activity: 12 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Sentient Biped's Garden Blog. Happy to add a different feed if there are suggestions.

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Comment by Joan Denoo on October 14, 2012 at 11:02am

The original root and shrub from great-grandma's grave is dying but there are many little ones sprouting all around it, so when the old shrub dies, there are still many viable roots from that stock. They are beautiful bushes and I am sure they will be very pretty. One is about 6 feet tall now, the others are from 2 inches above ground to about 3 feet. Life seeks to live and this ancient root lives on. Yes, the old one was fragrant. And I love her. 

Comment by Daniel W on October 14, 2012 at 8:57am
Clematis can be so dramatic!
I think I would prefer the old lilac from grandmother's grave, over a new one. Is it fragrant?
They say concords dont do well in my area so I stick eith some newer types. Love the concord grape flabor!
Comment by Joan Denoo on October 13, 2012 at 9:34pm

This one grows into the arborvitae and into an old scrawny lilic that isn't pretty, but I dug a root from one growing on my great-grandmother's grave located in a pine forest in Emida, Idaho. The lilac definitely is not a fancy variety, probably something my grandmother dug from her own garden. 

This is my neighbor to the east who has Clematis terniflora, (aka paniculata), “Sweet Autumn Clematis”.

Cary harvested my Concord grapes this week, leaving some for the birds. 

Comment by Daniel W on October 13, 2012 at 6:08pm

Ginkgo seeds almost ready to collect.  

I drive past this tree on my way home from work.  It is in a neglected park.  I've collected seeds from it in the past, started lots of little trees, gave most away.  This year I plan to do that again.  

In a long row of ginkgo trees, there are 2 females.  My guess is they were grafted trees and the scion died, leaving the seed grown rootstock to grow.  Just a guess.

*

If readers want some seeds to play with and plant, let me know and I will see if I can send some.  

Comment by Daniel W on October 13, 2012 at 5:55pm

Joan, I have several clematis.  I don't know the varieties.  One grew up into my neighbor's neglected and overgrown apple tree, about 40 feet tall.  Wild guess.   It was interesting to see those big blue flowers at the top of the tree.

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 12, 2012 at 5:12pm

My neighbor and I have been experimenting and exploring which kinds of clematis we each have and how we should care for them. First thing to know, the incorrect pruning may cost you a plant. We both have lost lovely clematis because we didn't know what we were doing. Here is a guide to help differentiate the three types. 
We also learned that clematis like tomato food. So, those are two problems solved. We keep learning together as we chat through the shared raspberry bushes that came into my garden from hers. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 12, 2012 at 5:01pm

Plant Paradise Country Gardens

This is an incredible garden with great combinations of colors, forms, and  textures. These ideas are keepers. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 10, 2012 at 5:02pm

A Brief History of the Wonderful Tomato

For those interested in history, here is a fun one on tomatoes. 

Comment by Joan Denoo on October 7, 2012 at 10:54pm

Annie, thanks for the lead to Ira Flatow and Steven Strogatz. A great interview. Feynman is one of my heros, a scientist who reflects on the consequences of his work. It is information such as these men discussed that convinced me no god is necessary. Natural processes have their way of creating cosmos out of chaos. Mathematics, the language of science, makes so much more sense because there are certain laws that either exist, or do not, and there are explanations why a law doesn't fit in different circumstances. Gravity is a low of the earth, but with enough velocity objects can escape earth's gravitational pull. From a universe point of view, laws of gravity apply. There is not a simple, absolute answer, it is all relative. Oh! I've heard that one before.  

Evolution is so much more interesting and exciting than creationist dogma, it explains processes of gravity, electro-magnetism, strong and weak forces making a mystery dissolve, even as these processes lead to even more mystery. Noticing patterns, as revealed by fractals and Fibonacci sequence, I knew natural order exists and all is not chaos. 
See my Fractals in Nature Photo Album: 

Fractals in Nature

Or, Fibonacci Sequence:

Fibonacci sequence

Comment by Daniel W on October 7, 2012 at 3:56pm

Joan and Annie,

I also wonder how the spider knows to build its web.  It's amazing!

No idea what kind of spider.  The web was on an arborvitae this morning.

I love having spiders around.  They eat lots of insects.  I think they are also a sign of ecological health.  Although I have no proof of that.

 

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