Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 170
Latest Activity: 12 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in sort of alphabetical order:
Aging.  Gardening with an older body.
bees.  insectary.  insectsbee gardening. Beneficial insects.  insects drive evolution

Compost.  herecontaminated compost.

Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.

Edible yard.  here  urban farmfront yards.
Growing Fruits

Folklore.

Fragrance and Scenthere.
Fruit growing.  in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.
Frugal gardening.  labels.

Gardening for future generations.  also permaculture, trees, historic varieties, soil

Hegelkultur here, here, here

Heritage and historic varieties.   heresources

locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.

Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.

PeppersHot peppers.

Permaculture MollisonFalk  Liu, Joan's IntroTransformation in 90 days, Perm Principles at work. Food forest, Holzer

Potatoes.  here.

Rooftop gardening.  here

Seed starting. starting spring crops.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.

Soil and soil building - healthy soil microbes, mycelium, dirt is everything, soil analysissoil pH.
Squirrels.

Synergies.

Tomatoes.  Myths and truths

Trees.  Tree tunnels.  Ancient tree planting. Plant commemorative trees

Discussion Forum

Gardening in central Texas "pan" soil

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Daniel W 12 hours ago. 2 Replies

An Old Lady's Hugelkultur Bed

Started by Barbara Livingston. Last reply by Randall Smith Dec 10. 3 Replies

Permaculture Concept. Bill Mollison

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Dec 6. 2 Replies

My south garden 1993 & 2013

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Dec 1. 1 Reply

Permaculture, Ben Falk

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 30. 0 Replies

Permaculture, Bill Mollison

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 16. 0 Replies

Plant Labels

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Joan Denoo Nov 8. 21 Replies

Design with Nature

Started by Joan Denoo Nov 6. 0 Replies

Sepp Holzer´s Permaculture

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Barbara Livingston Nov 6. 1 Reply

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Godless in the garden to add comments!

Comment by Patricia 12 hours ago

My husband's ''other'' hobby.......

Comment by Joan Denoo yesterday

You have been busy, Daniel. Your Battleground property, with the rich variety of plants you take there, offers a treasure for you to share with your neighbors. The joy of gardens comes in the richness with building community. 

Comment by Daniel W yesterday

Joan, I'm glad you post!  You are not loading me with more work - I was sitting here vegetating and needed something that did not require too much energy or thought.  There is so much good info there, indexing makes it easier to find.  I didn't do a perfect job - we won't let the perfect be the enemy of the good enough.

This week I did a bit of plant scrounging.  Three lilac starts taken from suckers, at the base of my old lilac hedge.  Each is a different variety.  One hazelnut, a volunteer in the front border, squirrel planted.  Two staghorn sumac.  All went to the Battleground place.  Free, organic, locally proven, vigorous plants.  Each of those is in the 2 foot tall range.

Comment by Joan Denoo yesterday

Daniel, thanks for the link. It is worth a try. 

Also, thank you for your work to mak files available easily. I hate to load you with more work, but I want to post on your garden page ... the title, "Godless in the Garden" suits me well.

It is amazing how much material flows to us now about permaculture. I'm sorting by author, generally. If there is another way you want me to do it, I will happily comply.  

Comment by Daniel W yesterday

I went through topics back to early 2012 and re-indexed them.  Links are above in the Welcome box.  So many people have posted such great topics and discussions, this reminded me of how  interesting and useful it is to go back and re-read some.  If you have a topic that I have not indexed, and want me to, please let me know!

Comment by Daniel W yesterday

Joan,


Not quite Spokane but here is a link that mentions American persimmons for N Central WA.

I think they would survive and grow there.  They have a deep tap root, so need to be transplanted when small.  I saw some larger ones at a local nursery here, but I don't know how they accomplished that.  The varieties that bear fruit without a male pollinator are Yates, Meader, and Prok.  And a few others.  Fall foliage is beautiful.  I like them partly because they are such an "American" tree, unique and predating the Euro invasion, also like pawpaws, and a tree that was apparently spread by now extinct megafauna.

I''m blathering...  better get some breakfast!  Have a great day!

Comment by Daniel W yesterday

Joan, excellent video!

The comments on the dust bowl led me to recall, I read N American soil blew as far as Europe, and in other readings I've read that African soil has blown to Brazil, and recently China soil reaches USA.  Unfortunately, I imagine most is lost to the ocean depths.

Like you, I take pride in actively building the soil in my little pocket of the world.  I wish I could talk to the neighbors - in countryside, they constantly burn their grass clippings and leaves.  Maybe after I retire.

Much of farming has become almost like a form of hydroponics, with no attention to maintaining that rich living and life giving matrix. 

On the polyploidy question - there are plants we use with abnormal chromosome numbers, so it's an interesting question.  Most bearded irises and daylilies are tetraploid.  Some apple varieties are triploid - Jonagold is one, I forget others. 


Not meaning to get away from your topic - it's fascinating and important! And inspires me to continue building soil in my little corner of heaven!
Comment by Joan Denoo on Friday

Comment by Randall Smith on Friday

Yes, I've always been a Jefferson admirer. And who isn't without a fault or two?!

Comment by Joan Denoo on Friday

According to "Edible Landscaping",  "The American persimmon (D. virginiana) is a faster growing, larger tree that's hardy to USDA zone 5." So, there is a possibility I could succeed with one here. I have a spot that needs filling. I will chat with my Extention Agent when I get a chance. 

Daniel, I like the Jefferson quote. I went to The Republic, Volume 3 By John Robert Irelan site and read a little more of Jefferson's quote.  

I am intrigued by the man, Jefferson, his devotion to the creation of a new republic based on human freedom, even as he owned slaves. I read of his attempts to get a wine growing enterprise going in a new country, even as he neglected the many grape cuttings sent to him from Europe and the Americas. 

 

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