Godless in the garden

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Godless in the garden

Welcome to gardeners, growers of veggies, fruits, flowers, and trees!  

 

Welcome  backyard hen enthusiasts, worm farmers, beekeepers & composters!

Location: Planet Earth
Members: 169
Latest Activity: 2 hours ago

Welcome to Eden!

If you like to dig in the dirt, plant & prune, grow food & flowers, or sit and watch as someone else does your landscaping, you'll find something here to discuss!

Selected topics, in no particular order:
Moon Phase Widget here. Moon phase topic here.
Frugal gardening.
Backyard Chickens here. here. here. here.
Growing Fruits
Why buy locally-grown plants?
Squirrels.
bees.
Cheap gardening.

Scientific Gardening.   The Informed Gardener.  The truth about garden remedies.
Buy locally grown plants to prevent blight transmission here.
Grow lots of fruits in a small space, by backyard orchard culture.

Discussion Forum

Compost

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by k.h. ky on Monday. 8 Replies

Potatoes. Growing the perfect food.

Started by Sentient Biped. Last reply by Sentient Biped Oct 11. 12 Replies

Permaculture Transformation In 90 Days

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Sky God Oct 10. 3 Replies

Backyard Organic Garden

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Oct 10. 9 Replies

Insectary

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Annie Thomas Oct 3. 10 Replies

Bunga Bakawali or Tan Hua (Epiphyllum oxypetallum)

Started by Sentient Biped. Last reply by Joan Denoo Sep 21. 13 Replies

"Healthy Soil Microbes / Healthy People"

Started by Sentient Biped. Last reply by Joan Denoo Sep 20. 26 Replies

Comment Wall

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Comment by Joan Denoo 2 hours ago

Barbara, I just read your wonderful comment about learning about composting. Most people do not realize how valuable leaves and grass are. But then, not everyone is interested in growing soil. As to what kind of soil pH to have for what plants, that just comes from experience. If you see a plant wilting in one place, it may be because the soil is not correct. A simple search on the internet will provide information on the needs of the plant and the soil requirements.

Recommended Soil pH for Growing Garden Fruits and Vegetables.

Vegetable pH Levels (list by Vegetable type).

pH for Trees, Shrubs, Vegetables, and Flowers.

The best way to know your soil pH is to call your Houston USDA Extention Agent for information on how to do the test. It is a simple process, just takes time. Because your soil is probably clay, you will need lots and lots of humus, which you will get from your compost. Your tiller will work fine working the humus into the clay. You could also use some sand. I get mine from the people to make tombstones. They will often give sand to you without charge, just haul it away. Sand from granite and marble offers many minerals to the soil. 

This sounds really complicated, I know. Just start slowly, Do a small patch at a time so you don't get too tired, and read a little as you encounter problems. 

Knowing that you are replacing your lawn, you could do lasagna composting. It saves you a lot of work, It kills the grass and you don't have to make a pile and move it later. 

Lasagna Composting

I do both bins and piles for my composts. I don't turn either of them. I fill bins or make the piles and make sure there is water getting to them. I use a soaker hose and during the summer I turn it on for a while and then off. During autumn, winter, and spring, I just let the rains keep the pile moist. You will have a different situation in Houston. 

During the winter, I do indoor composting with a worm farm. 

composting with worms

Right now, I am moving compost and it is a big job. I like it though. So do the mice and squirrels. 

Comment by Randall Smith 15 hours ago
Re: sweet potatoes. I plant about two dozen about 3' apart (extras from my farm kids). I have planted sprouted ends from "last year's" potatoes, but they usually don't do well for some reason. Never tried growing them in a container. Vines extend 20' or more.
To eat them, I've baked, zapped, fried, mashed, made pies, you name it! Used them in a stir fry last night.
Joan, thanks for the brick comment. Yes, I laid them all down over the years as I come across some. Most had mortar--a challenge to chip off. I have no intentions of extending the bricks all the way to the road.
Comment by Sentient Biped yesterday

Randy, those are great looking sweet potatoes.  How do you cook them?

Joan I am all into food forest concept.  My yard is sort of headed that direction, but not so officially.  Still, lots of fruit trees, and some trees for bee nectar, and some just trees.  I underplanted fruit trees with herbs.  Some work OK - oregano, thyme, but mint and lemon balm are too aggressive and need to come out.

 

Spud,  I hope that melon tastes bad, so they don't steal next year!

 

Joan, my soil is alive too, and part of the reason is your inspiration.  The raised beds, while made from the yard soil, are much darker soil, more crumbly, and have a nice earthy smell.  Lots of earthworms.   

 

I avoid petrochemicals.  If I was going to use them, it would be "medicinally" - to treat or cure a specific, tightly focused problem.  I have not done that in ages. 

 

Last weekend I planted garlic.  A nice October thing to do.  Weather, energy, and mood permitting, next weekend I want to clean up the perennial onion bed - walking onions and potato onions.  I because discouraged this year because deer kept eating them .  Deer don't read the books about what they are not supposed to eat.  But there are lots of starts, enough to fill a garden bed.  Then, before they get too big, build a frame to reduce herbivory.

Comment by Idaho Spud yesterday

I asked this on the Food group, but I may get more responses here.  Will sweet potatoes grow in a container like regular potatoes, where you keep adding material that they grow in?

Comment by Idaho Spud yesterday

Sounds good Joan.  I like the sound of a "Food Forest".

Comment by Joan Denoo yesterday

Spud, Seattle is developing a Beacon Food Forest Permaculture Project. You may not realize it, but you may be starting a new trend in your community. Pocatello, Idaho may become a Food Forest Permaculture Project. 

"A food forest is a gardening technique or land management system, which mimics a woodland ecosystem by substituting edible trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals. Fruit and nut trees make up the upper level, while berry shrubs, edible perennials and annuals make up the lower levels. The Beacon Food Forest will combine aspects of native habitat rehabilitation with edible forest gardening. 

"The goal of the Beacon Food Forest is to bring the richly diverse community together by fostering a Permaculture Tree Guild approach to urban farming and land stewardship. By building a community around sharing food with the public we hope to be inclusive to all in need of food. 

"The Food Forest is set to include an Edible Arboretum with fruits gathered from regions around the world, a Berry Patch for canning, gleaning and picking, a Nut Grove with trees providing shade and sustenance, a Community Garden using the p-patch model for families to grow their own food, a Gathering Plaza for celebration and education, a Kid's Area for eduction and play and a Living Gateway to connect and serve as portals as you meander through the forest. "

Comment by Joan Denoo yesterday

Randy, a beautiful harvest of sweet potatoes. Some mighty good eat'n awaits. I like your brick ground covering. Very pretty way to manage getting out of mud and having a solid surface. Did you put it in? 

Comment by Joan Denoo yesterday

Patricia, the video of the hummingbirds coming in through the open window to the feeder is a remarkable sight. The bird has the best of both worlds, access to freedom and the outdoors, and feeding in a safe place away from predators. What a nice idea. I wonder what the poop is like for a hummingbird? 

Comment by Joan Denoo yesterday

Daniel, organic gardening makes good sense, with the understanding that it takes knowledge of the effects of an organic garden and what it produces. Management by using nature's chemicals, such as barnyard manure, adds more than just nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. The chemical components may not support the bacterial growth and microbial metabolism life the way that compost and barnyard fertilizer does. There are times when I cannot find a source other than petrochemicals. Using them sparingly enhances the garden. With proper management, it harms very few other things. 

My soil is alive! Spreading compost around also spreads the earth worms and all the microbes that develop over a year's time. 

Years ago, I used gasoline to edge the grass from the borders and it killed the grass very nicely the first season. The second season I had the finest growth of grass bordering and invading my border than ever before. That tells us something about petroleum products and its use in the garden, doesn't it! 

Comment by Idaho Spud yesterday

I finally had a watermelon stolen a couple of days ago.  It was one that grew outside the fence.  It was just sitting there on the sidewalk, tempting everyone that walked by.  Haha, I think they're going to be disappointed in the taste.  Too much cold weather to ripen properly.  So far, In the two years I've grown them, no one has leaned over the fence to take one inside.  It would be easy to do.

I've been eating raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries for about 2 months.  They are finally tapering off.

 

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