I found one in MIT Science and Technology magazine. But it was out of my price range and I decided to wait until the price came down or maybe try to find another.

Seems National Geographic had one too something that they did but I missed out on that.

How do you ( would you ) find a reputable place to have this done?

Tags: DNA, MIT, Science, Technology, test

Views: 53

Replies to This Discussion

Thanks Steve.

I have not had the DNA test yet because of cost. Has anyone done it and did it provide interesting and useful information?

Denoo family ancestors from towns in Belgium: 

Brugge,

Koolskamp,

Lichtervelde,

Oostende,

Roeselare,

Ruddervoorde,

Torhout,

Wingene,

Zwevezele

I've done a couple. 23andMe is the best and most informative. They recently reduced their price from about $300 to $99. Very very accurate. Shows more than just ancestry as well. Has a health and traits section.

I got a DNA test through Ancestry.com.  I don't know how good they are.  The result was odd.  Or it seemed so to me.  I don't think it added much to my knowledge.  Mostly questions.

For background, my father's surnamed family emigrated from southwestern Germany in the 1860s.  Wine country, bordering what was once Alsace-Lorraine, and an area with lots of town names that sound similar to my surname.  They may have been Germans, or Alsatians, or French, or Jewish.  I have never met a stranger with my surname,  I used to look in phone books of various cities and almost never found it.  But more recent googling resulted in a number of Jewish connections with my name.  My Dad's other progenitors emigrated from other parts of what is now Germany.  Northeast and Northwest Germany.  They coalesced in a midwestern factory and farm town on the Mississippi, that had a "Germantown" section.  And still does.  My grandfathers family all spoke German, as 3rd generation Americans, but that stopped when there was WWI then WWII.

My mother's family consisted of dirt farmers who, through generations, apparently progressively drifted westward to Illinois, where they ran out of energy and became tenant farmers. Different groups mixed their DNA along the way.  Family legends suggested mixing with native Americans (doesn't everyone claim that?), and geographic locations / family stories / appearances suggested some were slave descendents - they lived in or near a town that was populated by freed slaves and white people, and there was mixing. (New Philadelphia Illinois - no longer exists).   My mother had cousins who were darker skinned, and her surname is also the name of a traditional Black college.  She had brown eyes and black hair, and I inherited the black hair but have hazel eyes.  My Dad had black hair and grey eyes.  Her mother's surname was German sounding, but other progenitors were thought Irish and English, with limited documentation; most were in North America back to the 1700somethings and none immigrated here after about 1700 I think. 

My Dad speculated that my mom was partly black Irish, which was thought to be either via the Spanish Armada or Basque on Irish soil.  Black Irish are supposedly darker than their Celtic neighbors.  My brother has somewhat of an olive complexion, with black hair and brown eyes like my mom.

What was my DNA test result?

  • Scandinavian
     72%
  • Southern European
     13%
  • Eastern European
     9%
  • Uncertain
     6%

 

Well, that's strange.  Nothing especially German sounding, which I expected to predominate.  The Ancestry.com site suggests Vikings spread their genes through Europe, which I understand, and Romans did the same.  But it still seems strange to me that the countries not on the map were the ones where my family had documented progenitors - Germany, France/Alsace, England, possibly Ireland.  And the Uncertain?  No way to speculate.

I don't know what it means.  Maybe, as my parents sometimes said, I really was a mix-up at the hospital, and none of my ancestors are known.  But there were no Scandinavians, that I know of, in my south-midwestern town when I grew up there.   Well, there was a smorgasbord, but I think that was fake.  And the Mediterranean part - is that the "Black Irish" contribution?

We also always wondered why my grandfathers' supposedly German siblings were named Alicia, Thrace, Lorenzo Eduardo, which didn't sound so German, but name trends change over time, so maybe they are.

I'll probably never know.  I sort of wish I'd saved something with my parent's DNA so I could see if I am biologically theirs.

I don't know what to make of the test result.

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