What Sex Means for World Peace

... there is a strong and highly significant link between state security and women's security. In fact, the very best predictor of a state's peacefulness is not its level of wealth, its level of democracy, or its ethno-religious identity; the best predictor of a state's peacefulness is how well its women are treated.What's more, democracies with higher levels of violence against women are as insecure and unstable as nondemocracies.

Our database rates countries based on several categories of women's security from 0 (best) to 4 (worst).On our scale measuring the physical security of women, no country in the world received a 0. Not one. The world average is 3.04, attesting to the widespread and persistent violence perpetrated against women worldwide, even among the most developed and freest countries. The United States, for instance, scores a 2 on this scale, due to the relative prevalence of domestic violence and rape.

It's ironic that authors such as Steven Pinker who claim that the world is becoming much more peaceful have not recognized that violence against women in many countries is, if anything, becoming more prevalent, not less so, and dwarfs the violence produced through war and armed conflict. To say a country is at peace when its women are subject to femicide -- or to ignore violence against women while claiming, as Pinker does, that the world is now more secure -- is simply oxymoronic.

[emphasis mine]

This reflects the extent to which Dominator Culture (where men have power over women) still prevails over Partnership Culture (where genders are equal).

Tags: gender inequality and war

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Thanks for sharing! Makes me realize once more how lucky I am to have no more than a few bruises. And how much work there is to be done!

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