Eco-Logical: A Group for Environmentalists

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Eco-Logical: A Group for Environmentalists

Eco-Logical is a group for anyone who cares about clean air, drinkable water, a sustainable economy, and environmental justice.

Location: The Irreplaceable Earth
Members: 326
Latest Activity: on Wednesday

Welcome to Eco-Logical: A Group for Environmentalists

 

Note: Sylvain Duford, the group's creator, has left A|N. I am acting as moderator of the group in his place. Please contact me if you have any questions. - Dallas the Phallus.

Discussion Forum

Curvy jet stream has history

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on Wednesday. 0 Replies

Fracking emits methane

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on Tuesday. 20 Replies

Drought as Amazon tipping point

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Joan Denoo on Tuesday. 1 Reply

Greener Jet Fuel

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by John Jubinsky Apr 11. 1 Reply

Methane, more scary than we thought

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Napoleon Bonaparte Apr 7. 25 Replies

Transition to Era of Renewable Energy is a LIE

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Grinning Cat Mar 28. 2 Replies

Coral Reefs Signal Ocean Extinction Event

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Mar 14. 3 Replies

Rockies Responsible for The Ridiculously Resilient Ridge

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Mar 7. 1 Reply

By 2035 fossil fuel will INCREASE by 40%

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Feb 15. 3 Replies

Energy efficiency

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Joan Denoo Feb 4. 2 Replies

Green Capitalism: The God That Failed

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Feb 3. 1 Reply

Good news

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Feb 3. 26 Replies

Will Pine Island Glacier be a major tipping point

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Joan Denoo Feb 1. 1 Reply

A cheesy solution to icy roads in Wisconsin

Started by Grinning Cat. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jan 31. 1 Reply

Biofuel and fish from desert and sea water

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jan 30. 0 Replies

Cold weather predictions last week of Jan

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jan 28. 0 Replies

Polar Vortex Wobbles cause Wild Weather

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Joan Denoo Jan 12. 2 Replies

Climate Wild Cards and unpredictability

Started by Ruth Anthony-Gardner. Last reply by Ruth Anthony-Gardner Jan 8. 1 Reply

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Eco-Logical: A Group for Environmentalists to add comments!

Comment by A Former Member on January 19, 2009 at 2:30pm
I love this show. If you've not listened to, it is well worth your time. I stream it online at work during the day.

Living on Earth
Comment by A Former Member on January 17, 2009 at 9:34pm
I haven't read this yet, but it is on my list to read. It looks good, but only has one customer review (four stars) on Amazon.com

Oil: A Beginner's Guide


Without oil, there would be no globalisation, no plastic, little transport, and a global political landscape that few would recognise. In this captivating book Vaclav Smil explains all matters related to the 'black stuff', from its discovery in the earth, right through to the political maelstrom that surrounds it today. Packed with fascinating facts and insight, this book will provide readers with the science and politics behind the world's most controversial resource.

-----


"At last, an accurate and readable book which effectively presents the whole range of issues which are required for an understanding of the complex global oil system." -- Peter Odell, Professor Emeritus of International Energy Studies, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, and recipient of the 2006 OPEC Award

"Smil's knowledge is famously and fabulously encyclopedic." Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director, Earth Institute at Columbia University and author of The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time. "Terrific. Smil has done it again, producing a book from which we can all create new insights, this time explaining oil production, consumption and the broader impacts it has upon society." Chris Mottershead - Distinguished Advisor Energy and the Environment, BP plc, and Director of the Carbon Trust in London. "At last, an accurate and readable book which effectively presents the whole range of issues which are required for an understanding of the complex global oil system." Peter Odell, Professor Emeritus of International Energy Studies, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, and recipient of the 2006 OPEC Award.

"Smil's knowledge is famously and fabulously encyclopedic." -- Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director, Earth Institute at Columbia University and author of The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time

"Terrific. Smil has done it again, producing a book from which we can all create new insights, this time explaining oil production, consumption and the broader impacts it has upon society." -- Chris Mottershead, Distinguished Advisor Energy and the Environment, BP plc, and Director of the Carbon Trust in London

"In a fluent, easy style [Smil] delves into the world of oil from its discovery on the ground through to its effect on prices at the petrol pumps, and to its impact on future generations." -- The Good Book Guide, May 2008
Comment by A Former Member on January 9, 2009 at 12:20pm
Must see DVD

A Crude Awakening - The Oil Crash

While the previous eco-doc Who Killed the Electric Car? spent some time on the world's oil crisis, A Crude Awakening (formerly OilCrash) builds an entire film around the subject. Swiss journalist Basil Gelpke and Irish filmmaker Ray McCormack have constructed their narrative in a conventional manner, alternating between talking heads, archival footage, and modern-day material, but the addition of several pieces by Phillip Glass is an artful touch (and evokes his work on 1988's The Thin Blue Line). Throughout, a diverse array of experts from the U.S., Azerbaijan, Venezuela, and other countries explain how the 20th century became addicted to "the blood of the dinosaurs," and why contemporary society needs to change course. As attorney/activist Matthew David Savinar puts it, "Oil is our God." As Stanford professor Terry Lynn Karl adds, "More and more oil is going to come from less and less stable places...places that actually challenge the taking of oil in the first place." One of the more chilling revelations concerns the discrepancy between the reserves oil-producing nations claim they possess and the actual amount. These padded estimates allow them to drill with impunity, leading to an abundance of wealth in the short term and cataclysmic consequences once they've depleted their supply of this non-renewable resource. A Crude Awakening isn't exactly a day-brightener, but Gelpke and McCormack are comprehensive and impartial in their inquiry, which makes for an informative examination of a vitally important subject. Extras include extended interviews with four participants and bonus chapter Petrostates. --Kathleen C. Fennessy
Comment by A Former Member on January 2, 2009 at 10:34am
The Golden Spruce: A True Story of Myth, Madness, and Greed

From Publishers Weekly
The felling of a celebrated giant golden spruce tree in British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands takes on a potent symbolism in this probing study of an unprecedented act of eco-vandalism. First-time author Vaillant, who originally wrote about the death of the spruce for the New Yorker, profiles the culprit, an ex-logger turned messianic environmentalist who toppled the famous tree—the only one of its kind—to protest the destruction of British Columbia's old-growth forest, then soon vanished mysteriously. Vaillant also explores the culture and history of the Haida Indians who revered the tree, and of the logging industry that often expresses an elegiac awe for the ancient trees it is busily clear-cutting. Writing in a vigorous, evocative style, Vaillant portrays the Pacific Northwest as a region of conflict and violence, from the battles between Europeans and Indians over the 18th-century sea otter trade to the hard-bitten, macho milieu of the logging camps, where grisly death is an occupational hazard. It is also, in his telling, a land of virtually infinite natural resources overmatched by an even greater human rapaciousness. Through this archetypal story of "people fail[ing] to see the forest for the tree," Vaillant paints a haunting portrait of man's vexed relationship with nature.
Comment by A Former Member on December 30, 2008 at 5:25pm
The Wild Trees: A Story of Passion and Daring

In this radical departure from Preston's bestsellers on catastrophic diseases (The Demon in the Freezer, etc.), he journeys into the perpendicular universe of the world's tallest trees. Mostly California redwoods, they are the colossal remnants of a lost world, some predating the fall of Rome. Suspended in their crowns, hundreds of feet above the forest floor, is a primeval kingdom of plants and animals that only a handful of people have ever seen. Now, thanks to Preston and a custom-made tree-climbing apparatus called a "spider rig," we get to see it, too. According to Preston, it wasn't until the 1980s that humans made the first forays into the tops of "supertall" trees, in excess of 350 feet high. The people who pioneered their exploration are a rarefied bunch—equal parts acrobat, adventurer and scientist. The book revolves around botanist Steve Sillett, an exceptional athlete with a tormented soul who found his calling while making a borderline suicidal "free" climb to the top of an enormous redwood in 1987, where he discovered a world of startling complexity and richness. More than 30 stories above the ground, he found himself surrounded by a latticework of fused branches hung with gardens of ferns and trees bearing no relation to their host. In this Tolkienesque realm of sky and wind, lichens abound while voles and salamanders live and breed without awareness of the earth below. At almost the exact moment that Sillett was having his epiphany in the redwood canopy, Michael Taylor, the unfocused son of a wealthy real estate developer, had a revelation in another redwood forest 200 miles to the south. Taylor, who had a paralyzing fear of heights, decided to go in search of the world's tallest tree. Their obsessive quests led these young men into a potent friendship and the discovery of some of the most extraordinary creatures that have ever lived. Preston's tireless research, crystalline writing style and narrative gifts are well suited to the subject. Sillett, Taylor and their cohorts, who include a Canadian botanist named Marie Antoine, are fascinating, often deeply wounded characters. Their collective passion and intensity have illuminated one of the most vulnerable and poorly understood ecosystems on this continent. Preston adds a personal twist by mastering the arcane tree climber's art of "skywalking" and partnering with Sillett and Antoine on some of their most ambitious ascents. As impressive as this is, Preston's cameo appearance disrupts the flow of the main narrative and somewhat dilutes its considerable power. John Vaillant is the author of The Golden Spruce: A True Story of Myth, Madness and Greed (Norton) and winner of the Canadian Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction (2005).
 

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