Race, Ethnicity, & Culture

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Race, Ethnicity, & Culture

Beliefs about race and ethnicity influence our cultures, politics, and relationships.  What is race?  What is ethnicity?  This group explores those concepts.

Location: Global
Members: 232
Latest Activity: Jan 20

Welcome!

Racism and the effects of ethnocentrism are alive and well in the 21st century.  Racism and humanism are incompatible by definition. 

 File:BlueMarble-2001-2002.jpg

The most human, and humane, thing that we can do is acknowledge and support the humanity of people who are different from ourselves.  Curiosity about what makes us human, by necessity, includes curiosity about our human ethnic heritage.

 

We are incredibly enriched by immersing ourselves in a diverse world.  We are intellectually and emotionally impoverished when we exclude others who are not our mirror image.

 

This discussion group includes many topics about race and ethnicity.  Feel free to comment to new threads, or resurrect old threads, if any spark your interest.

 

My 2 cents. Sentient Biped.

 

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Discussion Forum

Lawsuit: Wrong sperm delivered to lesbian couple

Started by The Flying Atheist. Last reply by The Flying Atheist Oct 14, 2014. 8 Replies

The Whiteness Project

Started by Daniel W Oct 14, 2014. 0 Replies

Reading on the topic of Race, Ethnicity, and Culture.

Started by Daniel W. Last reply by Joan Denoo Sep 20, 2014. 1 Reply

The Guardian / World / Race Issues

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Comment by Eddie E. Hicks Sr. on July 16, 2013 at 9:28am

I wish all of the people who wrote those hateful racist comments in regards to that commercial could be forced to watch this.

Comment by A Former Member on July 16, 2013 at 7:07am

Comment by Ruth Anthony-Gardner on June 18, 2013 at 4:37pm

Comment by Daniel W on June 6, 2013 at 9:06pm

Don, thank you for commenting.  Perspective, and context, are critical for getting a grip on tribalism racism ethnocentrism....  etc.  I agree with you that 'color blind' is dishonest.  At least for our generation.  I don't know about young people who grow up in a more mixed world.  That doesn't mean enmity, or that we deny each other's humanity, or that anyone, anywhere, deserves less than human treatment.  It does mean that people see in each other that we are not clones.

Natalie, the more I think about it, the more I think "tribalism" is accurate, too.  I have some discomfort with things German, even though ethnically I am German - I saw in my upbringing too many traits of self-assured "we are right, they are less than us".  Arrogance, hubris, superiority, dogmatism.  What led me to forgive it was largely that I discovered those traits in man y if not most other ethnic groups.

It's such an important topic.  Also so interesting as to tribalism may be such a part of being human, it could be one of our defining characteristics.  If so - is our salvation to counteract it?  Or learn to harness tribalism in some what towards good for all?  And how could that be done?

Comment by Natalie A Sera on June 6, 2013 at 8:26pm

Sentient, I think "tribalism" is a VERY accurate word, not only for the situation in Israel, but also the rest of the Arab world, much of Africa and South Asia. Even in my own case, being Jewish, I was raised to be very much aware that I was not a member of the dominant tribe of this country. You probably couldn't tell by looking at me, but I know that a lot of my morals and ideals were, indeed, shaped by my tribe. Fortunately, I come from a very liberal sect, and we were taught from a young age that discrimination was wrong, and that people are people, and not to harm them unless they are trying to harm ME, and then the best way is still to get out of harm's way and report to the authorities (but I have to say that the bells of Nazi Germany still reverberate in the heart of most Jews, so they do have strong feelings about self-defense). However, I was even taught to forgive Germany, because the Germans of my age or a little older were too young or as-yet-unborn when that happened, so have no blame for it. Personal responsibility.

I don't know what I could do to change our society, which I see as having improved in some ways and deteriorated in others, except in my own actions, to stand as a role model. We all need to teach others about living together as a species of different breeds on the same planet.

Comment by Donald R Barbera on June 6, 2013 at 5:12pm
Unfortunately, race is a reality. It depends upon one's perspective. Even those who perceive race as no issue find themselves standing viewing things from different demographics and despite good intentions can never truly understand racism, classcism, tribalism or ethnicism.
Whether or not we can become an ideal society is an entirely different idea or matter. The politics of division are heavy in the United States and I have seen no signs of it changinging. Colorblind? No. Just dishonest.
Comment by A Former Member on June 5, 2013 at 10:23pm
Comment by Daniel W on May 16, 2013 at 11:28pm

Commentary on the racism of Upper Nazareth's mayor Shimon Gafsou.   In addition to thinking about the issues presented (The mayor wanting to maintain the "Jewish character" of his community), there is the label "racism".  Here we have someone who, to the rest of the world, is the same race as the people he wants to exclude.  And it's "racism".  Sort of like Hutu cs. Tutsi.  I'm not saying that in a lame attempt at humor - it's an analogy.  

I wonder if a better, more accurate word is possible.  I've thought "tribalism" might be the word.  the baggage of the term is different.  Not sure if more or less accurate, and more or less stigmatizing.

Comment by Daniel W on March 7, 2013 at 9:49pm

The Good Racist People - By Ta-Nehisi Coates.  Coates always makes me think.

Comment by Harlem Humanists on February 21, 2013 at 2:48pm

2013 NYC Day of Solidarity for Black Non-Believers

The Day of Solidarity for Black Non-Believers (DoS) is held annually on the final weekend in February. Nonbelievers use this day as an opportunity to build genuine communal relationships and launch a wave of activism among non-theists of color. The DoS event is also an effort to bring out closeted nonbelievers and let them know that they are not alone.

 

The event is Free and open to the public.  ALL are Welcome.

 

Rio II Art Gallery

7th Floor (Main Exhibition Space)

583 Riverside Dr.

Harlem, NY 10030

137th Street “City College” Stop on #1 Train

1pm - 4pm

Sunday, Feb’ 24th 2013

Try to RSVP MeeUp CFI-NYC or Richie's List 

 

Light Refreshments and Snacks will be served.

 

Program - 

Ayanna Watson of Black Atheists of America has sparked a project focusing on the diversity of careers within the secular community. The project includes photographic portraits and some personal testimony about work experience, passion and aspiration.

Ayanna will introduce some of the project’s participants. There will be the chance to ask questions and share stories, including your own. 

 

Seon M. LewisThe Spice Island Atheist and one of the voices of Caribbean Atheists, is a consistent Harlem Community member many of us know from his sharp observations, broad knowledge and warm easygoing style. He recently completed the book “From Mythology to Reality: Moving Beyond Rastafari”. His liberating intellectual journey from theism, through mystical Afrocentrism, to reasoned non-theism is one of following the evidence to where it leads. 

Seon will share how he came to write his book, which challenges  pseudo-history and false assumptions about a vital resistance culture. It also looks at how an inspiring rebel community can fall pray to sexism, racism, homophobia and xenophobia. The way he respectfully engages family and community in a conversation about mythology and fiction vs. reality and facts is an informative one. How to be Afrocentric without drowning in the dogma of Afrocentrism, or any “...ism” including our own, is part of what he’ll share. 


Sponsored by - Center for Inquiry - New York City, Black Atheists of America, African Americans for Humanism, CFI-Harlem & Harlem Humanists.

 

Dinner afterwards at local Restaurant -TBA

 

After Event Entertainment - "The Vagina Monologues"  to benefit 'Sanctuary for Families'.  6pm at All Souls Unitarian Church

E-mail - black(dot)beyond(dot)belief(at)gmail.com for more info and updates. Or call 646-820-CFIH (2344)

 

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