Bill McKibben's tour. I missed out because I didn't buy tickets early enough, and now the Phila venue is sold out.

Tags: Do the Math Tour

Views: 519

Replies to This Discussion

Great video

Journalist Naomi Klein on Capitalism and Climate Change

Naomi Klein, author of "Shock Doctrine" reports on a new book and documentary with activist Bill McKibben called "Do the Math." The number of people who don't think climate change is human caused has dropped dramatically. According to a Harris poll in 2007, 71% of USA citizens believed that climate change was real and it was human caused. By 2010, that number went down to 44%. From 71% to 44%; that is an unbelievable drop in belief. When you look at the coverage this issue received in the media, it's also dropped dramatically from that high point in 2007. 

Thanks for the link. Most people miss that

... climate change... is the essence of a collective problem. This is our collective atmosphere. We can only respond to this collectively. So the environmental movement responded to that by really personalizing the problem and saying, "Okay, you recycle. And you buy a hybrid car." And treating this like this could or we'll have business-friendly solutions like cap and trade and carbon offsetting. That doesn't work. So that's part of the problem.[emphasis mine]

We can't buy our way out of climate destabilization. She didn't say that markets have no role.

This is something that money can't buy. We do have to pay attention to markets. I wish I had a Crystal ball. 

Do the Math Tour
"
The “Do The Math” tour was in Washington D.C. yesterday, and the energy was incredible. After the show, thousands of us marched to the White House and called on President Obama to reject the Keystone XL pipeline once and for all. "

email sent  Date: November 19, 2012 2:58:07 PM PST

RSS

Support Atheist Nexus

Donate Today

Donate

 

Help Nexus When You Buy From Amazon

Amazon

 

© 2014   Atheist Nexus. All rights reserved. Admin: Richard Haynes.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service