I am writing a term paper for a political theory class on the topic of intolerance in film.  I am intending to write about how film can teach viewers about intolerance, either critiquing or promoting intolerance, specifically intolerance stemming from a religious POV.  I need to twiddle it down to one or two specific instances of intolerance (I am thinking misogyny and/or promotion of violence to "others") and I am looking for film ideas to write about.

I need to specifically focus on the use of images in the films - things like the book burning scene (and subsequent mural painting) in the film Pleasantville

To give you an idea of some of the films I was considering, I was thinking of using two or more of the following:

Jesus Camp (almost definitely choosing this one)
Fight Club (Tyler Durden as christ figure, project mayhem = xtian mob mentality)
Antichrist (women portrayed as evil, child sacrifice, reference to garden of eden/original sin)
The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (references to many gods)
The Life of Brian (comical satire mocking images of xtianity)
The Golden Compass (magisterium = catholic church, children being ruined, misogyny again)
The Wrestler (misogyny, prodigal son-esque fall from grace tale, xtian tattoos)
American Beauty (misogyny again, homophobia, adultery, statutory rape, religious undertones)
Se7en (seven deadly sins represented visually)
Legend (darkness = idea of the devil that xtians teach their kids - not a true biblical ref, though)
The Apostle (one man's fall from grace, misogyny, adultery)
The Prophecy (evil angel, good vs evil, strong xtian imagery)
A Serious Man (haven't seen it yet, just know it revolves around judaism)


Any suggestions (especially if you can hint to me why you are suggestion it) would be greatly appreciated.

Sehr dank!


Tags: christianity, film, intolerance, politics

Views: 23

Replies to This Discussion

To quote yourself,

I am intending to write about how film can teach viewers about intolerance, either critiquing or promoting intolerance, specifically intolerance stemming from a religious POV.

Nowhere did you ask for open-mindedness or liberalness. So I'd say Griffith fits your requirements perfectly, and he's as good a candidate you'll ever find to point out how the perception of (in)tolerance evolved over the history of filmmaking.

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