American Humanist Association (AHA)

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American Humanist Association (AHA)

The American Humanist Association advocates progressive values and equality for humanists, atheists and freethinkers in the United States. We work to promote humanism--the idea that you can be good without a god.

Website: http://www.americanhumanist.org
Location: Washington, DC
Members: 762
Latest Activity: 9 hours ago

AHA Updates

Humanist Press is the publishing house of the American Humanist Association, providing material for the humanist/freethought/atheist market since 1995.

With the largest print book seller in the United States now selling more ebooks than paper books, it was time the freethought movement invested in the future of publishing so that we can remain relevant and accessible to readers in the U.S. and around the globe.

With new ebooks becoming available on a bi-monthly basis, Humanist Press will have a regularly expanding catalog of interest to atheist and agnostic humanists everywhere. Visit HumanistPress.com

 

Darwin Day is a global celebration of science and reason held on or around Feb. 12, the birthday anniversary of evolutionary biologist Charles Darwin.

On this website you can find all sorts of information about Charles Darwin and the International Darwin Day Foundation. If you are hosting a Darwin Day event, you can post information about it on our events listing. You can also locate Darwin Day programs near you by searching our events section.

Let Humanism Ring! The American Humanist Association is pleased to announce that its 73rd Annual Conference will be held June 5-8, 2014 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Join hundreds of humanists, atheists and freethinkers in Philadelphia for a four-day celebration of humanism! The American Humanist Association will feature informative lectures, book signings, celebrity guests, networking opportunities, child care, fun activities and more!

Book your room early by calling the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel at 1-800-325-3535 (mention the American Humanist Association) or visit the AHA’s Personalized Reservation Page to get the special rate of $169 per night (subject to taxes). Rates increase after May 5, 2014 so reserve now!

More information will be announced soon!

Discussion Forum

Violence Against Women

Started by Joan Denoo. Last reply by Gail Apr 22, 2013. 9 Replies

Advice for an atheist volunteer.

Started by Vulpes. Last reply by Joan Denoo Feb 4, 2013. 3 Replies

God's Plan for Rape Victims

Started by Brian Magee Nov 5, 2012. 0 Replies

Humanist Network News

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Comment by Brian Magee on June 27, 2012 at 3:42pm

The Parade of Privilege: How Government Favors Religion

Luis Granados, director of the AHA’s publishing house, Humanist Press, responds to the Catholic bishops' Fortnight for Freedom, a 14-day campaign which, according to the Washington Post, “purports to champion religious freedom, but in actuality distorts it by promoting the use of religion as a license to discriminate.”

Religious Privilege #2: Crime and Punishment

While the bishops prattle on in their “Fortnight of Freedom” about how oppressed religion is in today’s America, the fact of the matter is that God experts occupy a lofty pedestal, with all kinds of special privileges not available to the one-third of Americans who are not religious. Yesterday we looked at the church property tax exemption, worth a cool $26 billion a year. Today, let’s look at crime and punishment.

Should people who claim to have a particular set of beliefs about supernatural spirits in the sky be subject to the same criminal laws that you and I have to obey? Of course they should. Why is this even a question?

To read the rest of this article, click here.

Visit the American Humanist Association’s Facebook page every day beginning June 27 where we counter the Catholic Bishop’s Fortnight for Freedom by posting a special privilege experienced only by churches in the United States.

Comment by Brian Magee on June 26, 2012 at 2:55pm

The Parade of Privilege: How Government Favors Religion

Luis Granados, director of the AHA’s publishing house, Humanist Press, responds to the Catholic Bishop’s Fortnight for Freedom, a 14-day campaign which, according to theWashington Post, “purports to champion religious freedom, but in actuality distorts it by promoting the use of religion as a license to discriminate.”

We’ve just begun enduring the Fortnight for Freedom, the Catholic bishops’ 14-day whine festival to “restore religious liberty.” What a joke! Religion in America today not only has all the “liberty” one could imagine but also enjoys an extraordinary array of special privileges. So, as a brief counterpoint of sanity amidst the sanctimony, we offer the Parade of Privilege: a daily reminder of the myriad ways that government props up religion, favoring God experts over the estimated one-third of Americans who are not religious. When we reach the end of the Parade, ask yourself this: how much higher would that one-third be if government provided a truly level playing field?

To read the rest of this article, click here.

Visit the American Humanist Association’s Facebook page every day beginning June 27 where we counter the Catholic Bishop’s Fortnight for Freedom by posting a special privilege experienced only by churches in the United States.

Comment by Brian Magee on June 25, 2012 at 3:31pm

In 1958, Gallup first asked Americans if they would vote for an atheist for president. Only 18% said they would. In 1978 the number was 40%. In 1999 it was up to 49%. Now, for the first time, 54% of Americans say they would vote for an atheist president!

Organizations like the American Humanist Association are helping to change the culture so that atheists and humanists are recognized and respected, and your support makes a difference.

Become a member today: www.americanhumanist.org/join

Comment by Brian Magee on June 25, 2012 at 3:30pm

@Solmarie: Yes!

Comment by Brian Magee on June 21, 2012 at 2:41pm

A Reinvigorated Feminist Caucus

This year’s American Humanist Association 71stAnnual Conference saw a lot of wonderful things come to fruition, one of them being the tireless efforts of Feminist Caucus Chair Stephanie Downs Hughes and newly appointed Feminist Caucus Co-Chair Zelda Gatuskin to get the AHA Feminist Caucus back to action. Zelda Gatuskin, president of the Humanist Society of New Mexico and editor-in-chief of Amador Publishers LLC, contacted Stephanie Downs Hughes about mobilizing activity for the Feminist Caucus at the annual conference.

Stephanie, unable to attend, appointed Zelda co-chair, and members in attendance at the Feminist Caucus Business Meeting unanimously affirmed her leadership.  Zelda had the support of her chapter's newly formed Feminist Caucus HSNM in preparing the agenda, handouts and displays for the AHA Feminist Caucus’s presence at the conference. Members of her HSNM delegation kept FC events running smoothly. 

The business luncheon saw a turnout of 28 Feminist Caucus members, including 3 AHA board members, to discuss action items such as state level FC organizations, rotating chapter leadership, “Pass the ERA” campaign activity, and mentorship and colleagueship programs. Ideas were also fielded about restarting the Feminist Caucus newsletter, which has been dormant since 2007. 

In addition to hosting the Feminist Caucus Business Meeting, the Feminist Caucus also helped host and support the screening of Miss Representation, a film by Jennifer Seibel Newsom about the way women are treated in modern media, and how these limited portrayals of women are negatively impacting women in leadership. The Feminist Caucus was also active at a table hosting an Equal Rights Amendment petition for AHA members to sign and show support for the renewed efforts to “Pass the ERA.”  More on that at www.united4equality.com.

 

To read the rest of this Humanist Network News article, click here.

Comment by Brian Magee on June 20, 2012 at 2:04pm

June 21: Happy World Humanist Day

By James A. Haught

People sometimes ask me whether I'm an agnostic, an atheist, a skeptic–or what. I have a standard reply: I don't think about labels; I just think about being honest and truthful.

Honest people don't claim to know supernatural stuff that nobody can know. Truthful people don't say they're sure of gods, devils, heavens, hells, miracles, saviors and the like, when there's no actual evidence.  Ministers who proclaim certainty about invisible, magical things are dishonest, I think.

Years ago, when I was a young news reporter, my city editor was an H.L. Mencken-style cynic who laughed at hillbilly preachers, and I joined him. But as a naïve seeker of wisdom, I worried--so  I told him, "OK, you're right that they're spouting fairy tales and mumbo-jumbo, but what's the actual truth? Why are we here? Why is the world here? Why do we live and die?  What answer can an honest, sincere, thinking person give?"

He eyed me and replied, "You can say: I don't know." Bingo. That rang a bell in my psyche that I've never forgotten. Admitting that you don't know is truthful. It's just about the only honest stand you can take. Confessing that you cannot answer is moral and honorable.

Later, I realized that an honest person can go further to reach rational conclusions about whether supernatural claims are plausible. You can't really prove that invisible fairies don't dance in the darkness, or that the Virgin Mary doesn't miraculously appear to believers, or that witches don't copulate with Satan, or that the Angel Moroni didn't reveal golden plates and later take them back to heaven, but your intelligence can conclude that such claims are so far-fetched that they should rank with children's fantasy stories.

 

To read the rest of this article from the latest edition of Humanist Network News, click here.

Comment by Brian Magee on June 19, 2012 at 2:07pm

Author Nikki Stern brings us Hope in Small Doses

Her new book shares a version of hope that accepts uncertainty and embraces possibility

Contact:
Humanist Press: Brian Magee, 202-238-9088 bmagee@americanhumanist.org
Author: nikki@nikkistern.com

In Nikki Stern’s first book, Because I Say So: the Dangerous Appeal of Moral Authority, she used her experiences as a 9/11 widow to examine a culture that supports unequivocal moral certainty. Hope in Small Doses, released May 31 by Humanist Press, takes a natural next step in exploring how hope might be sustained, even in the wake of tragedy and uncertainty.

Hope in Small Dosesembarks on a journey to find meaning, purpose and a measure of happiness. Rejecting hope that relies on divine providence or the infallibility of the human mind, Stern ultimately embraces a version driven not by expectation but by possibility, grounded in reason and fueled by faith in our capacity to learn and change. Feisty, erudite and deeply moving, this is an uplifting book offering a workable blueprint for a reasonably happy life.

“We could all use hope right now,” Stern suggests. “The notion of hope in small doses may seem unnecessarily cautious, but we can always ask for seconds.”

Following the death of her husband on 9/11, Stern served as executive director of Families of September 11 (FOS11) and shared an award from the conflict transformation group Search for Common Ground. She has written for the New York Times, Newsweek, USA Today, Humanist Magazine, Princeton Magazine, and a number of online publications. She’s also appeared on NPR’s “All Things Considered” and CBS’s Sunday Morning, among other outlets.

Hope in Small Doses is available in print and ebook versions. The latter takes full advantage of many available features, including interactive reader commentary, author videos, and useful web links. Information on the book and where to buy either the print or ebook version is included on the website HopeInSmallDoses.com.

Fun and insightful videos related to the book can be found on our Vimeo channel.

Excerpts from Hope In Small Doses can be found here: http://www.americanhumanist.org/system/storage/63/74/9/3124/Hope_In...

Upcoming Humanist Press titles will include Damned Good Company by lawyer Luis Granados; and Make the Break (If You Can)by retired NASA scientist Reginald J. Exton.

###

Humanist Press is the publishing house of the American Humanist Association, providing material for the humanist/freethought/atheist market since 1995. The American Humanist Association (www.americanhumanist.org) advocates for the rights and viewpoints of humanists and atheists in the United States. Founded in 1941 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., its work is extended through more than 140 local chapters and affiliates across America.

Comment by Brian Magee on June 14, 2012 at 10:41am

Michigan Residents: Tell Your State Senators To Oppose The Julea Ward Freedom Of Conscience Act!

Dear Friend,

Earlier this year, I informed you of a bill in the Michigan House of Representatives that would subvert the national standards of the counseling process and legalize discrimination in our nation’s higher education institutions. This bill, House Bill 5040, also known as the “Julea Ward Freedom of Conscience Act,” has now passed the Michigan House of Representatives and moves to the state Senate for approval.

The “Freedom of Conscience Act” was created following a tragic incident at Eastern Michigan University where a gay student was discriminated against by a fellow student named Julea Ward. Ms. Ward, who served as a graduate counselor in the university’s counseling program, was removed from her position and expelled from the university after she attempted to refer a client to another counselor because the client's file indicated a past gay relationship, a relationship Ms. Ward morally opposes as an evangelical Christian.

The Code of Ethics of the American Counseling Association and the Ethical Standards of the American School Counselor Association, which student counselors are obliged to follow as a curricular requirement of the university, mandate that counselors are not to allow their personal values to intrude into their professional work. Since Ms. Ward broke these standards, the school was correct in terminating her from her position. Simply put, the passage of this misleading “Freedom of Conscience Act” would give students in the counseling, social work, or psychology programs free rein to discriminate against LGBT students or students who do not agree with their religious views.

If you are a Michigan Resident, this is your chance to stand up aga...

The American Humanist Association is committed to defending the right of all people not to be discriminated against, and stands in favor of the rigorous standards that are present in the counseling profession. I ask you to help defeat the Julea Ward Freedom of Conscience Act b.... Thank you for standing up against religious discrimination.

Sincerely,

Roy Speckhardt
Executive Director

P.S. If you're not a Michigan resident, be sure to read about this controversy because it may be an issue in your state next.

Comment by Brian Magee on June 12, 2012 at 3:06pm

Below is a selection from our recently received "love" letters.

Comment by Brian Magee on June 5, 2012 at 12:55pm

The Humanist Hour #74: Bad Religion

A new episode of the Humanist Hour is available for listening!

In this month’s podcast, Todd Stiefel and guest co-host Scott Burdick interview Bad Religion lead vocalist Greg Graffin and bassist Jay Bentley backstage at the Reason Rally.

Thanks to Scott Burdick for capturing and providing the Humanist Hour with the audio content for this month!

 

For complete details on this podcast, click here.

 

 

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